Workaholics best moments

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Workaholism: A Review

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Sours: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3835604/

BLAKE ANDERSON: Shoot man, I don’t think you can ever anticipate such a thing—I guess I never thought this far into the picture. I don’t think we ever set out to fail, like “This is it,” but in season one we were definitely like, “Oh yeah, this is just a short dream.” That’s why when we were filming season one we were still living in that house. We were pretty sure we were just getting our rent checks paid by Comedy Central for however long the season went. We were by no means certain that any of this would last longer than one season. 

Has it continued to feel like this personal production the entire time, or has it shifted into a more corporate feel at any point? 

It’s always had the same feel because it’s always had the same nucleus of me and the dudes. It’s very much a baby of our brains and our brand. We’ve always worked very closely together in all parts of the show. It’s definitely changed in the way that anything that you do over eight years is going to change—you yourself change as a human—but yeah, it’s still just friends making a TV show. 

I suppose then on the topic of this final season, were you trying to say anything special here? Judging by the first episode, it seems like you have the concept of wrapping things up and closure on your mind at least to some degree.

Yeah, I feel like this is the first season that we toy with the idea that we’re not these characters that are trapped in time where we don’t age. We definitely have Alice call us out and go, “Yo, seven or eight years ago this was funny and cute, but you’re getting older…” So time definitely creeps into our minds a bit. By the final episode we do manage to make a statement about what the show has meant to us as a group of friends. I think overall this season is just like all the others. We really didn’t want to rob our fans by totally derailing the show in order to make some sort of statement. The episodes are pretty much standalone, stupid, fun episodes. 

On that note, did you have a lot of deliberation over what you were going to do for the final episode, or did you approach it more casually like any other one?

Sours: https://www.denofgeek.com/tv/workaholics-blake-anderson-on-his-favorite-guests-drugs-and-series-memories/
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7 Shows Like 'Seinfeld' to Watch for More Nothingness

By Jason Robbins

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I think I can sum up the show for you in one word. Nothing.

Most fans fondly remember Seinfeld as “the show about nothing.” This, of course, came from the show itself, as Jerry (Jerry Seinfeld) and George (Jason Alexander) pitched this very idea to fictional television executives on an episode of Seinfeld, mimicking the basic pointlessness and lack of lessons learned that their characters’ lives exalted in, and which made the actual show so darn funny. But that wasn’t the only characteristic that made Seinfeld such an immense success. There were several key ingredients that went into the Seinfeld pot, including highly irreverent humor bordering on sociopathic, complete selfishness of all the characters (even towards each other), relentless ridicule of anyone unlike themselves, and terrifically absurd supporting characters. Basically, it made no apologies for its complete absence of family or moral values, traits that had been used by almost all sitcoms until Seinfeld hit the airwaves. So, with the show having recently started streaming on Netflix, we at Collider thought we’d provide you, our dear readers, with some other viewing options that feature the same hilariously dark features of human behavior in which Seinfeld reveled.

1) Curb Your Enthusiasm

Where else would we start this list but with the show by and starring the co-creator of Seinfeld himself, Larry David. This is a man that’s been quoted as saying that George Costanza was based on himself. And if Curb Your Enthusiasm is anything like his real life, he’s not wrong. Larry (the scripted version) is just as selfish, offensive, and ignorantly self-destructive as any of the characters on Seinfeld. Plus, the show is an HBO original, and thus features content and situations that its predecessor, being a network sitcom, could never dare to explore. While Larry’s main group of pals aren’t quite as chemically perfect as the gang on Seinfeld, the laughs still come hard and fast in this fictional take on the man behind Seinfeld’s absurd daily life.

RELATED: The Best 'Seinfeld' Supporting Characters, Ranked

2) It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

Depending on your taste for and tolerance of irreverence and dark humor, you might find this show even funnier than Seinfeld itself. I do. It features four dudes and a gal that run a pub in Philly. The characters themselves are all perfectly fleshed-out with antisocial and psychotic tendencies, and yet disparate enough from each other to make them fit perfectly together as the most dysfunctional group that may have ever been amassed on the small screen. This could also easily be defined as a show about nothing, as the gang’s episodic antics have run the gamut of pointlessness and absurdity, covering everything from filming laughably moronic versions of Lethal Weapon sequels to solving the mystery of who pooped the bed (Charlie [Charlie Day] and Frank [Danny DeVito] live in a tiny decrepit studio apartment, and so, both sleep on the same fold-out couch). If you’re easily offended, I’m not sure what you’re doing reading this article, but stay far, far away from this show.

3) The League

The League is another show with few boundaries when it comes to the appropriate or sacred. The main premise of the proceedings is a yearly fantasy football competition between a group of friends, which has allowed for guest appearances by quite a few NFL players, but more importantly, provokes the characters to do terrible and insidious things to each other to gain an advantage in the league. The cast is hilarious, featuring Mark Duplass, Nick Kroll, Katie Aselton, Jason Mantzoukas, and even the occasional drop-in by Seth Rogen. Like Jerry’s character in Seinfeld, Duplass’s Pete tends to date a different girl every week and find insignificant idiosyncrasies in them to take issue with.

4) Veep

One could hardly write a Seinfeld-like list of shows without including Veep. Here, Seinfeld’s Julia Louis-Dreyfus takes on a hilariously thankless job as Vice President of the United States, equipped with a staff that’s roughly half incompetent and half destructively self-serving. The veep herself is highly selfish, making political promises she couldn’t care less about keeping (can you imagine something like that?), making good-will appearances and then mocking the people and causes she claims to be behind, and putting her own aspirations above even the well-being of her own daughter. None of it gets too dark, and it’s all in good fun. Very good fun.

5) Workaholics

Workaholics is a bit like It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, except that the three protagonists here live together and work as telemarketers, instead of running a bar. Their humor also stems more from a place of incredible ignorance, repeated romantic and sexual failure, and good old-fashioned alcoholism and drug use. Basically, they lampoon themselves more than anyone else around them, not that they don’t have a great supporting cast of comedians. Workaholics features younger talent, and as such, more juvenile humor than the others on this list, but it is still hilarious.

6) You’re the Worst

This show may feature the most uncaring, sociopathic characters of all on this list, and that’s saying something. In fact, the main premise of You’re the Worst is the relationship between Jimmy (Chris Geere) and Getchen (Aya Cash), who only really get together because they’re such hateful misanthropes that no one else could stand them. Still, they have their small group of friends who have their own comedic idiosyncrasies, and who, along with Jimmy and Getchen, all mistreat and bad-mouth each other to riotous effect.

7) Arrested Development

While Arrested Development does feature an actual family, with children and all, like most sitcoms do, it does not try to dole out life lessons and heartfelt moments. Not one bit. The family is deeply dysfunctional, a once-powerful dynasty that has fallen onto hard but hilarious times. The cast is killer, featuring the talents of Jason Bateman, Will Arnett, Jessica Walter, David Cross, and Alia Katshaw. Most of the characters are so psychologically off, they could never survive in society without what little money and support the family has left. While they do come together on occasion (when it suits their interests), don’t look here for tender family fare. You won’t find it.

KEEP READING: Which 'Seinfeld' Character Wins In a Deathmatch? These 7 Classic Episodes Hold the Answer

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About The Author
Jason Robbins (20 Articles Published)

I was a computer scientist who became a lawyer, who became an amateur novelist/screenwriter, who became a pop culture content writer and never looked back. Currently I write movie/tv/video game features for Collider.

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Sours: https://collider.com/shows-like-seinfeld-to-watch-next/
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Workaholics Season Three DVD Review









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Anders, Adam and Blake are back for more inebriated
shenanigans and adventures in Workaholics
Season Three, which is probably the series’ strongest season so far. There are
some seriously hilarious episodes in this collection. There are also plenty of
surprising guest stars, such as Sally Kellerman as a delicious randy older
woman, Mickey Jones as a man who was a roadie for ZZ Top and now wants to do
some hard drugs, Alex Borstein as Montez’s wife, and Tom Green as himself (just
remember, when Tom Green attacks, it’s best to finger the nearest computer).




And I’m so glad there is a Hungry Hungry Hippos reference
in the second episode. I mention that game often, and no one knows what the
hell I’m talking about. (By the way, the Shutter
Island stuff in that episode is hilarious.)




The three-disc set contains all twenty episodes, as well
as some bonus material. Here are just a few thoughts on some of this season’s
best episodes:




“The Business
Trip” – The guys are getting the house ready for an acid trip. It’s always
good to be prepared. Timothy Leary would approve. But Anders suddenly has
to go on a business trip. Adam and Blake surprise him by showing up in his hotel
room to do acid. As you might guess, there is plenty of hilarious material
here. I burst out laughing when Blake grabs some kind of snake-like demon. And
Alice is adorable when the drug kicks in for her (“Help me, I think this chair is Spanish”). (Man, it’s been a while,
but I think I’d like to do acid again.)




“The Meat Jerking
Beef Boys” – They drag a dead cow into the house and take a chainsaw to it
in an effort to create a beef jerky company. But Anders’ successful dad shows
up, and they need to impress him because Anders has lied about his life (there
was a Monkees episode that did the exact same thing, minus the cow). This
episode stars the excellent William Atherton as Anders’ dad, Thor.




“The Lord’s Force”
– The guys want to see The Lord’s Force, some religious buff dudes, but don’t
have tickets. They try to talk their way in. Adam helps by saying, “When I was a kid I always tried to make my
dog have sex with my cat because I wanted a catdog. Turns out their dicks don’t
fit into cats and the cat limps now.” They wait and take the Lord’s Force
dudes out drinking afterwards, and the alcohol helps release the Lord’s Force’s
inner gayness.




“Real Time” –
The guys, a bit drunk on their roof, call their boss and leave awful messages
on her voicemail. The next day, they wake up (Blake somehow on another roof),
and they immediately regret leaving those messages. They’re not hung over, and
realize they’re still drunk. So they keep drinking to avoid a hangover, and
rush to the office to delete the messages. I absolutely love this episode.




“A TelAmerican
Horror Story” – Adam is spooked during a horror movie marathon, and can’t
sleep. But that’s nothing compared to the events of the next day at work when
Blake finds a creepy portrait. So many moments in this episode had me laughing
out loud. I love this bit of conversation:

Blake: “Is it
possible for a painting to have homosexual tendencies?”

Jillian: “Of
course, why?”

After Adam tastes some blood he freaks out, thinking he’s
HIV positive. Blake exclaims, “We have to
make you a quilt!” There’s a really funny sequence in the bathroom, which
features an excellent guest star appearance by Robert Englund.




In fact, the only episode I don’t like is “Fourth And
Inches.” I don’t like the episodes with the high school kids, because the guys
seems terribly pathetic, but not in a fun way. Something about them being
outdone by high school kids is just not enjoyable. (There was an episode with
high school kids in an earlier season, and that was my least favorite episode
from that year as well.)




Special Features




This three-disc set has several special features, most of
which are on the third disc. There is a blooper reel, which is approximately nine
and a half minutes, though some of it is just the cast members messing around
on set. There is also a series of alternate takes (approximately nine minutes).
The “My Queen” music video is a very silly video with Montez crawling around on
a bed.




The special features also include three episodes of The Other Cubicle, featuring Montez,
Waymond and Jet Set. Each episode is approximately three minutes, the funniest
one being “Nap Time,” in which Jillian disturbs their naps and then attempts to
do their jobs.




There are also commentaries on all of the episodes. They
call them “Drunkmentaries,” and if that keeps you from listening to them, well,
you’re not alone.




Workaholics
Season Three was released on June 18, 2013 through Comedy Central.






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Anders, Adam and Blake are back for more inebriated shenanigans and adventures in Workaholics Season Three, which is probably the series’ strongest season so far. There are some seriously hilarious episodes in this collection. There are also plenty of surprising guest stars, such as Sally Kellerman as a delicious randy older woman, Mickey Jones as a man who was a roadie for ZZ Top and now wants to do some hard drugs, Alex Borstein as Montez’s wife, and Tom Green as himself (just remember, when Tom Green attacks, it’s best to finger the nearest computer).
And I’m so glad there is a Hungry Hungry Hippos reference in the second episode. I mention that game often, and no one knows what the hell I’m talking about. (By the way, the Shutter Island stuff in that episode is hilarious.)
The three-disc set contains all twenty episodes, as well as some bonus material. Here are just a few thoughts on some of this season’s best episodes:
“The Business Trip” – The guys are getting the house ready for an acid trip. It’s always good to be prepared. Timothy Leary would approve. But Anders suddenly has to go on a business trip. Adam and Blake surprise him by showing up in his hotel room to do acid. As you might guess, there is plenty of hilarious material here. I burst out laughing when Blake grabs some kind of snake-like demon. And Alice is adorable when the drug kicks in for her (“Help me, I think this chair is Spanish”). (Man, it’s been a while, but I think I’d like to do acid again.)
“The Meat Jerking Beef Boys” – They drag a dead cow into the house and take a chainsaw to it in an effort to create a beef jerky company. But Anders’ successful dad shows up, and they need to impress him because Anders has lied about his life (there was a Monkees episode that did the exact same thing, minus the cow). This episode stars the excellent William Atherton as Anders’ dad, Thor.
“The Lord’s Force” – The guys want to see The Lord’s Force, some religious buff dudes, but don’t have tickets. They try to talk their way in. Adam helps by saying, “When I was a kid I always tried to make my dog have sex with my cat because I wanted a catdog. Turns out their dicks don’t fit into cats and the cat limps now.” They wait and take the Lord’s Force dudes out drinking afterwards, and the alcohol helps release the Lord’s Force’s inner gayness.
“Real Time” – The guys, a bit drunk on their roof, call their boss and leave awful messages on her voicemail. The next day, they wake up (Blake somehow on another roof), and they immediately regret leaving those messages. They’re not hung over, and realize they’re still drunk. So they keep drinking to avoid a hangover, and rush to the office to delete the messages. I absolutely love this episode.
“A TelAmerican Horror Story” – Adam is spooked during a horror movie marathon, and can’t sleep. But that’s nothing compared to the events of the next day at work when Blake finds a creepy portrait. So many moments in this episode had me laughing out loud. I love this bit of conversation: Blake: “Is it possible for a painting to have homosexual tendencies?” Jillian: “Of course, why?” After Adam tastes some blood he freaks out, thinking he’s HIV positive. Blake exclaims, “We have to make you a quilt!” There’s a really funny sequence in the bathroom, which features an excellent guest star appearance by Robert Englund.
In fact, the only episode I don’t like is “Fourth And Inches.” I don’t like the episodes with the high school kids, because the guys seems terribly pathetic, but not in a fun way. Something about them being outdone by high school kids is just not enjoyable. (There was an episode with high school kids in an earlier season, and that was my least favorite episode from that year as well.)
Special Features
This three-disc set has several special features, most of which are on the third disc. There is a blooper reel, which is approximately nine and a half minutes, though some of it is just the cast members messing around on set. There is also a series of alternate takes (approximately nine minutes). The “My Queen” music video is a very silly video with Montez crawling around on a bed.
The special features also include three episodes of The Other Cubicle, featuring Montez, Waymond and Jet Set. Each episode is approximately three minutes, the funniest one being “Nap Time,” in which Jillian disturbs their naps and then attempts to do their jobs.
There are also commentaries on all of the episodes. They call them “Drunkmentaries,” and if that keeps you from listening to them, well, you’re not alone.
Workaholics Season Three was released on June 18, 2013 through Comedy Central.

Sours: https://www.butlercountytimesgazette.com/article/20130625/BLOGS/306259959

Moments workaholics best

All Women's Talk

One thing Comedy Central has provided us with is some of the best Workaholics moments. This show is downright hilarious. No, really, your stomach will hurt from so much laughing. Adam Devine, Blake Anderson, and Anders Holm are genius together. There are SO many laugh out loud moments in the show, it was pretty hard to narrow it down to just seven of the best Workaholics moments. However, these moments are definitely worthy of a spot on the list.


1 Adam's Dating Logic

Adam's dating logic is one we should all have. I mean, everyone should want to date you. You're great! If they don't, they're wrong and you should hate them. Ha ha, WTG Adam. This episode is really funny. All three guys are into the same woman at work, but of course, it doesn't work out for any of them. Maybe that's why Adam has such a harsh take on dating. This is, in my opinion, one of the best Workaholics moments.


2 Wizard Rap

I can't even watch the entire video without cracking up. I mean, the guys rapping as wizards? Priceless. This episode was hilarious! Adam tries to become a body builder and ultimately fails. But at the end of the day, Ders and Blake are there to make him feel better and of course, welcome him back into their wizard clan. Gotta love these boys.


3 Getting Physical

Whenever I watch this clip, I seriously die laughing. Adam and Blake together are my favorite. The way they talk to each other is hilarious. When Blake gets him down and starts talking to him like a little baby, I die. And when Adam talks about all the things he wished he did with his life, it's hard not to crack up. It's hilarious that those are the things Adam talks about when he's "dying".


4 New Kids in School

The episode where the boys go back to high school is too funny. Adam tries way too hard to be "cool" and completely fails. That Blink 182 shirt? Priceless. Blake becomes a swirly victim and Ders is just off trying to get someone to confess to stealing their statue! The boys are so all over the place, it's hard not to laugh.


5 Blake Sees God

This episode was hilarious! I love this clip. Blake "sees God" behind the counter and also sees the picture God has of him (which is just a picture of a dog). Alice kills me too. I'm so used to seeing her as this uptight boss lady, but in this episode she really became one of the boys. She's just as hilarious as they are!


6 "We Are No Idiots"

Their logic always gets me. In order to keep from burning their tongues at an eating contest, they decide to burn their tongue themselves. That way, you know, they won't feel their tongues getting burned and they can just keep eating. I mean, makes sense, right? Only for these boys! It's hilarious to see the type of things they decide to do.


7 Slim Shady

This video makes me lose it every time. Ders as a blonde? Not so sure it works for him! That's why I love it when Adam calls him Slim Shady! It's hilarious.

There you have it! These are some of my favorite Workaholics moments. There are so many more, like pretty much the entire series. Which Workaholics moment was your favorite? Who's your favorite character?

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