Red screen virus 2017

Red screen virus 2017 DEFAULT

Red screen virus pop-up

If you didn't click on anything in that popup windows you're probably OK but we can double check.

&#;

pgif Download Security Check from here or here and save it to your Desktop.

  • Double-click SecurityCheck.exe
  • Follow the onscreen instructions inside of the black box.
  • A Notepad document should open automatically called checkup.txt; please post the contents of that document.


NOTE 1. If one of your security applications (e.g., third-party firewall) requests permission to allow DIG.EXE access the Internet, allow it to do so.
NOTE 2. SecurityCheck may produce some false warning(s), so leave the results reading to me.
NOTE 3. If you receive UNSUPPORTED OPERATING SYSTEM! ABORTED! message restart computer and Security Check should run

pgifPlease download Farbar Service Scanner(FSS) and run it on the computer with the issue.
  • Make sure the following options are checked:
    • Internet Services
    • Windows Firewall
    • System Restore
    • Security Center/Action Center
    • Windows Update
    • Windows Defender
    • Other Services
  • Press "Scan".
  • It will create a log (FSS.txt) in the same directory the tool is run.
  • Please copy and paste the log to your reply.


pgifPlease download MiniToolBoxand run it.

Checkmark following boxes:
  • Report IE Proxy Settings
  • Report FF Proxy Settings
  • List content of Hosts
  • List IP configuration
  • List Winsock Entries
  • List last 10 Event Viewer log
  • List Installed Programs
  • List Devices (do NOT change any settings here)
  • List Users, Partitions and Memory size
  • List Restore Points

Click Goand post the result.

pgifPlease download Malwarebytesto your desktop.
  • Double-click MBSetupConsumer.exe and follow the prompts to install the program.
  • Then click Finish.
  • Once the program has fully updated, select Scan Now on the Dashboard. Or select the Threat Scan from the Scan menu.
  • If another update of the definitions is available, it will be implemented before the rest of the scanning procedure.
  • When the scan is complete, make sure that all Threats are selected, and click Remove Selected.
  • Restart your computer when prompted to do so.
  • The Scan log is available throughout History ->Application logs. Please post it contents in your next reply.


pgifDownload 51a5fbicon_MBAR.pngMalwarebytes Anti-Rootkit(MBAR) to your desktop.
  • Warning!Malwarebytes Anti-Rootkit needs to be run from an account with administrator rights.
  • Double click on downloaded file. OK self extracting prompt.
  • MBAR will start. Click "Next" to continue.
  • Click in the following screen "Update" to obtain the latest malware definitions.
  • Once the update is complete select "Next" and click "Scan".
  • When the scan is finished and no malware has been found select "Exit".
  • If malware was detected, make sure to check all the items and click "Cleanup". Reboot your computer.
  • Open the MBAR folder located on your Desktop and paste the content of the following files in your next reply:
  • "mbar-log-{date} (xx-xx-xx).txt"
  • "system-log.txt"


NOTE. If you see This version requires you to completely exit the Anti Malware applicationmessage right click on the Malwarebytes Anti-Malwareicon in the system tray and click on Exit.

pgifPlease download Rkill(courtesy of BleepingComputer.com)to your desktop.
There are 2 different versions. If one of them won't run then download and try to run the other one.
You only need to get one of these to run, not all of them. You may get warnings from your antivirus about this tool, ignore them or shutdown your antivirus.

rKill.exe: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/rkill/dl/10/
iExplore.exe(renamed rKill.exe): http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/rkill/dl/11/

  • Double-click on the Rkill desktop icon to run the tool.
  • If using Windows Vista, 7 or 8 right-click on it and chooseRun As Administrator.
  • A black DOS box will briefly flash and then disappear. This is normal and indicates the tool ran successfully.
  • If not, delete the file, then download and use the one provided in Link 2.
  • Do not reboot until instructed.
  • If the tool does not run from any of the links provided, please let me know.


If normal modestill doesn't work, run the tool from safe mode.

When the scan is done Notepad will open with rKilllog.
Post it in your next reply.

NOTE. rKill.txtlog will also be present on your desktop.

NOTEDo NOT wrap your logs in "quote" or "code" brackets.
Do NOT use spoilers.
Do NOT edit your reply to post additional logs. Create new reply. I'll not get any email notifications about edits so I won't know you posted something new.

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, clickDONATE

&#;

Sours: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t//red-screen-virus-pop-up/

What is Critical ERROR scam?

Critical ERROR virus is a tech support scam campaign that aims to trick people into revealing their personal details

Red screen critical ERROR virus misleadingly claims that it was triggered by Microsoft. However, it belongs to cybercriminals.

Critical ERROR is a scam that has nothing to do with Microsoft. This red screen message has been used to scare people about invented problems on Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, and other web browsers. While trying to mislead users into thinking that their personal information is in danger, scammers display a red screen error that shows up on the screen while they browsing the Internet. Please, do NOT fall for Google Chrome critical error and similar scams because they belong to scammers who will do their best to steal your money, credit card details, and other personal information or infect your PC with malware.

NameCritical ERROR scam
TypeTech support scam/virus
Versions appear in
  • Google Chrome;
  • Microsoft Edge;
  • Mozilla Firefox;
  • Internet Explorer.
SymptomsCauses a red warning message on the affected browser, which reports about the risk of identity theft. Pushes victim into contacting certified Microsoft&#;s technicians who are all fake
Numbers used by this scam
  • +1();
  • +1();
  • +1();
  • +1();
  • +1()
removalUse anti-malware tools to check the system for adware-type viruses causing the fake error messages on your screen
repairVarious changes and alterations were done to preferences and settings on the system can lead to issues with the performance. Run ReimageIntego to find and repair any occurred damage

Special Offer

Users might become victims of the tech support scam[1] while they are browsing on infected or high-risk websites. However, if the browser continuously opens a new tab or window with this site, it’s definitely caused by the potentially unwanted program (PUP), usually adware.

The Critical ERROR red screen virus is designed to redirect users to a corrupted website that delivers a message warning about computer infection and urges them to call a provided phone number. Criminals might pretend to be official Microsoft support technicians and:

  • sell you useless security software to get your credit card information;
  • convince you into installing remote access software to solve the problem quicker;
  • download malware, ransomware,[2] or spyware into your computer.

Scammers are great in human psychology and can use social engineering perfectly. Thus, you may not notice how you follow their demands and give everything they ask for. For this reason, you should not call them even for fun. If redirects continue, you should take all necessary measures to remove the virus from the device.

In order to clean the computer quickly and without putting too much effort, you should take advantage of professional anti-malware software. Anti-malware such as SpyHunter 5Combo Cleaner, Malwarebytes is a perfect choice for Critical ERROR removal.

"Critical ERROR" scam might target Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Microsoft Edge users.

Versions of Critical ERROR scam

Mozilla Firefox Critical ERROR. This version of the tech support scam is designed to trick Firefox users that their personal data is in danger. The malicious website delivers a fake authentication box that requires entering a username and password. However, none of your current credentials will work. It’s trickery that is supposed to convince you into calling a fake support line.

Crooks are known for using +1 () and +1 () numbers. The message itself might also provide an error code. Currently, it delivers system errors 0xKB and 0xKB However, none of them are real, and calling provided number is not recommended.

Internet Explorer Critical Error. IE users might be tricked that their computers are infected with RDN/Trojan.worm![rand]. In order to protect their passwords, browsing-related information, browsing history, identity, and credit card information from being exposed or sold, users have to call +1

However, this number does not belong to Microsoft Technical Support, as the message says. Therefore, the call might be expensive (even if it says it’s toll-free), crooks might actually swindle your sensitive data, money, or get access to your computer.

Microsoft Edge virus affects the specific web browser. However, there are numerous versions designed to affect other web browsers.

Microsoft Edge Critical ERROR. Cybercriminals pretend to be official Microsoft technicians that report about detected viruses on the computer. This alleged system error also asks to call a toll-free number in order to get needed help to fix the computer.

However, Microsoft does not deliver security alerts on Microsoft Edge. Thus, this pop-up is created by cybercriminals that have hidden purposes, such as selling you useless security software or getting remote access to your PC, and installing malware.

Google Chrome Critical Error. Chrome is the most popular web browser, so there&#;s no surprise that Chrome users can receive a Critical Error alert too. This version of the tech support scam barely differs from the previous ones. Scammers threaten that user&#;s private information might be in danger, and they need to call + 1 () phone number to get needed help.

However, redirects to a malicious website that delivers a fake critical error pop-up are usually triggered by adware. Thus, users are advised to check the computer’s security and eliminate the potentially unwanted program to stop this activity. Hence, calling a fake &#;Help Desk&#; won&#;t help to solve the problem.

Google Chrome error virus is the most popular version of the scam.

Users fall into installing adware because of a lack of attention

As you already know, various adware programs might be responsible for redirecting to the Critical system ERROR scam websites. Infiltration of the PUP might seem mysterious. However, security experts from the UK, Germany,[3] and the U.S. report that there’s no mystery; it’s only a deceptive software marketing method known as bundling.

It allows adding the PUP into the freeware or shareware package. Therefore, when a user downloads a program, he or she might install it as well. The hijack might be unexpected if you use a Standard/Recommended setup because it does not openly disclose about third-party apps. Thus, you should never rely on them.

Always install new software under Advanced/Custom settings and opt-out of all pre-selected applications. Most of them are useless, and you should not test out them.

Get rid of Critical ERROR virus from your browsers entirely by using a simple guide

To remove the virus from Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, or Google Chrome might seem like a simple task. However, you will have to find all PUPs, hijackers, and adware hiding on your system and causing fake ads while you are browsing the web. Typically, such threats infiltrate systems together with legitimate software, so there is no surprise that you can&#;t remember downloading such a virus to your computer.

If you want to fasten the entire process, we recommend using anti-malware software. Updated security software can not only take care of Critical ERROR removal. It can also help you identify and terminate all PUPs that are considered to be suspicious. After you finish this procedure, make sure you reset your web browsers to clean them entirely.

You may remove virus damage with a help of ReimageIntego. SpyHunter 5Combo Cleaner and Malwarebytes are recommended to detect potentially unwanted programs and viruses with all their files and registry entries that are related to them.

WindowsmacOSEdgeFirefoxChromeSafari

Uninstall from Windows

Special Offer

Instructions for Windows 10/8  machines:

  1. Enter Control Panel into Windows search box and hit Enter or click on the search result.
  2. Under Programs, select Uninstall a program.
  3. From the list, find the entry of the suspicious program.
  4. Right-click on the application and select Uninstall.
  5. If User Account Control shows up, click Yes.
  6. Wait till uninstallation process is complete and click OK.

If you are Windows 7/XP user, proceed with the following instructions:

  1. Click on Windows Start >Control Panel located on the right pane (if you are Windows XP user, click on Add/Remove Programs).
  2. In Control Panel, select Programs > Uninstall a program.
  3. Pick the unwanted application by clicking on it once.
  4. At the top, click Uninstall/Change.
  5. In the confirmation prompt, pick Yes.
  6. Click OK once the removal process is finished.

WindowsmacOSEdgeFirefoxChromeSafari

Delete from macOS

Special Offer

Remove items from Applications folder:

  1. From the menu bar, select Go > Applications.
  2. In the Applications folder, look for all related entries.
  3. Click on the app and drag it to Trash (or right-click and pick Move to Trash)

To fully remove an unwanted app, you need to access Application Support, LaunchAgents, and LaunchDaemons folders and delete relevant files:

  1. Select Go > Go to Folder.
  2. Enter /Library/Application Support and click Go or press Enter.
  3. In the Application Support folder, look for any dubious entries and then delete them.
  4. Now enter /Library/LaunchAgents and /Library/LaunchDaemons folders the same way and terminate all the related .plist files.

WindowsmacOSEdgeFirefoxChromeSafari

Remove from Microsoft Edge

Special Offer

Delete unwanted extensions from MS Edge:

  1. Select Menu (three horizontal dots at the top-right of the browser window) and pick Extensions.
  2. From the list, pick the extension and click on the Gear icon.
  3. Click on Uninstall at the bottom.

Clear cookies and other browser data:

  1. Click on the Menu (three horizontal dots at the top-right of the browser window) and select Privacy & security.
  2. Under Clear browsing data, pick Choose what to clear.
  3. Select everything (apart from passwords, although you might want to include Media licenses as well, if applicable) and click on Clear.

Restore new tab and homepage settings:

  1. Click the menu icon and choose Settings.
  2. Then find On startup section.
  3. Click Disable if you found any suspicious domain.

Reset MS Edge if the above steps did not work:

  1. Press on Ctrl + Shift + Esc to open Task Manager.
  2. Click on More details arrow at the bottom of the window.
  3. Select Details tab.
  4. Now scroll down and locate every entry with Microsoft Edge name in it. Right-click on each of them and select End Task to stop MS Edge from running.

If this solution failed to help you, you need to use an advanced Edge reset method. Note that you need to backup your data before proceeding.

  1. Find the following folder on your computer: C:\\Users\\%username%\\AppData\\Local\\Packages\\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe.
  2. Press Ctrl + A on your keyboard to select all folders.
  3. Right-click on them and pick Delete
  4. Now right-click on the Start button and pick Windows PowerShell (Admin).
  5. When the new window opens, copy and paste the following command, and then press Enter:

    Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers -Name Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register “$($_.InstallLocation)\\AppXManifest.xml” -Verbose

Instructions for Chromium-based Edge

Delete extensions from MS Edge (Chromium):

  1. Open Edge and click select Settings > Extensions.
  2. Delete unwanted extensions by clicking Remove.

Clear cache and site data:

  1. Click on Menu and go to Settings.
  2. Select Privacy and services.
  3. Under Clear browsing data, pick Choose what to clear.
  4. Under Time range, pick All time.
  5. Select Clear now.

Reset Chromium-based MS Edge:

  1. Click on Menu and select Settings.
  2. On the left side, pick Reset settings.
  3. Select Restore settings to their default values.
  4. Confirm with Reset.

WindowsmacOSEdgeFirefoxChromeSafari

Remove from Mozilla Firefox (FF)

Special Offer

Remove dangerous extensions:

  1. Open Mozilla Firefox browser and click on the Menu (three horizontal lines at the top-right of the window).
  2. Select Add-ons.
  3. In here, select unwanted plugin and click Remove.

Reset the homepage:

  1. Click three horizontal lines at the top right corner to open the menu.
  2. Choose Options.
  3. Under Home options, enter your preferred site that will open every time you newly open the Mozilla Firefox.

Clear cookies and site data:

  1. Click Menu and pick Options.
  2. Go to Privacy & Security section.
  3. Scroll down to locate Cookies and Site Data.
  4. Click on Clear Data&#;
  5. Select Cookies and Site Data, as well as Cached Web Content and press Clear.

Reset Mozilla Firefox

If clearing the browser as explained above did not help, reset Mozilla Firefox:

  1. Open Mozilla Firefox browser and click the Menu.
  2. Go to Help and then choose Troubleshooting Information.
  3. Under Give Firefox a tune up section, click on Refresh Firefox&#;
  4. Once the pop-up shows up, confirm the action by pressing on Refresh Firefox.

WindowsmacOSEdgeFirefoxChromeSafari

Remove from Google Chrome

Special Offer

Delete malicious extensions from Google Chrome:

  1. Open Google Chrome, click on the Menu (three vertical dots at the top-right corner) and select More tools > Extensions.
  2. In the newly opened window, you will see all the installed extensions. Uninstall all the suspicious plugins that might be related to the unwanted program by clicking Remove.

Clear cache and web data from Chrome:

  1. Click on Menu and pick Settings.
  2. Under Privacy and security, select Clear browsing data.
  3. Select Browsing history, Cookies and other site data, as well as Cached images and files.
  4. Click Clear data.

Change your homepage:

  1. Click menu and choose Settings.
  2. Look for a suspicious site in the On startup section.
  3. Click on Open a specific or set of pages and click on three dots to find the Remove option.

Reset Google Chrome:

If the previous methods did not help you, reset Google Chrome to eliminate all the unwanted components:

  1. Click on Menu and select Settings.
  2. In the Settings, scroll down and click Advanced.
  3. Scroll down and locate Reset and clean up section.
  4. Now click Restore settings to their original defaults.
  5. Confirm with Reset settings.

WindowsmacOSEdgeFirefoxChromeSafari

Delete from Safari

Special Offer

Remove unwanted extensions from Safari:

  1. Click Safari > Preferences&#;
  2. In the new window, pick Extensions.
  3. Select the unwanted extension and select Uninstall.

Clear cookies and other website data from Safari:

  1. Click Safari > Clear History&#;
  2. From the drop-down menu under Clear, pick all history.
  3. Confirm with Clear History.

Reset Safari if the above-mentioned steps did not help you:

  1. Click Safari > Preferences&#;
  2. Go to Advanced tab.
  3. Tick the Show Develop menu in menu bar.
  4. From the menu bar, click Develop, and then select Empty Caches.

After uninstalling this potentially unwanted program (PUP) and fixing each of your web browsers, we recommend you to scan your PC system with a reputable anti-spyware. This will help you to get rid of Critical ERROR scam registry traces and will also identify related parasites or possible malware infections on your computer. For that you can use our top-rated malware remover: ReimageIntego, SpyHunter 5Combo Cleaner or Malwarebytes.

When you work on the domain, site, blog, or different project that requires constant management, content creation, or coding, you may need to connect to the server and content management service more often. The best solution for creating a tighter network could be a dedicated/fixed IP address.

If you make your IP address static and set to your device, you can connect to the CMS from any location and do not create any additional issues for the server or network manager that needs to monitor connections and activities. VPN software providers like Private Internet Access can help you with such settings and offer the option to control the online reputation and manage projects easily from any part of the world.

While much of the data can be accidentally deleted due to various reasons, malware is one of the main culprits that can cause loss of pictures, documents, videos, and other important files. More serious malware infections lead to significant data loss when your documents, system files, and images get encrypted. In particular, ransomware is is a type of malware that focuses on such functions, so your files become useless without an ability to access them.

Even though there is little to no possibility to recover after file-locking threats, some applications have features for data recovery in the system. In some cases, Data Recovery Pro can also help to recover at least some portion of your data after data-locking virus infection or general cyber infection. 

About the author

Olivia Morelli
Olivia Morelli- Ransomware analyst

If this free guide helped you and you are satisfied with our service, please consider making a donation to keep this service alive. Even a smallest amount will be appreciated.

Contact Olivia Morelli
About the company Esolutions

References

  1. ^The fight against tech support scams. Microsoft blogs.The official Microsoft Blog.
  2. ^ Lisa Vaas. Tech support scammer tricked into installing ransomware. Naked Security. Computer security news, opinion, advice and research.
  3. ^DieViren. DieViren. German cyber security news.

Removal guides in other languages

• Lietuvių
• Polski
• Deutsch
• Português
• Español

Sours: https://wwwspyware.com/remove-critical-error-scam.html
  1. Goat compatibility chinese zodiac
  2. Mouse simulator game
  3. Rabbi kaduri letter
  4. Eppicard nm login

Someone else just reported the same thing: https://support.mozilla.org/questions/

A lot of times this is a bogus window from one of your browsers, a scam to charge your for tech support services you don't need. They can be spread through ads on popular sites, or links that look legitimate but lead to such fake warnings.

There are a number of different ways that such dialogs could appear in Firefox, including separate pop-up windows (should have the usual buttons in the upper right corner), and script alerts, which may only have an OK button.

With script alerts, pressing the Esc key several times in a row quickly may prevent the script from showing the dialogs over and over and allow you to close the tab normally. Closing normally is useful because then Firefox won't try to restore that tab automatically in your next session.

Some script alerts that re-open will have a checkbox on the bottom left not to let the site show any more dialogs. If you see that, you can check it and then OK the dialog so it doesn't come back. Here's what that looks like from another thread: https://support.cdn.mozilla.net/media/uploads/images/dba.png

What's going on in your Firefox at the moment: can you start it up without those dialogs coming back? If necessary, we can describe how to remove/hide your previous session history files so that Firefox can't try to open that page again.

Someone else just reported the same thing: https://support.mozilla.org/questions/ A lot of times this is a bogus window from one of your browsers, a scam to charge your for tech support services you don't need. They can be spread through ads on popular sites, or links that look legitimate but lead to such fake warnings. There are a number of different ways that such dialogs could appear in Firefox, including separate pop-up windows (should have the usual buttons in the upper right corner), and script alerts, which may only have an OK button. With script alerts, pressing the Esc key several times in a row quickly may prevent the script from showing the dialogs over and over and allow you to close the tab normally. Closing normally is useful because then Firefox won't try to restore that tab automatically in your next session. Some script alerts that re-open will have a checkbox on the bottom left not to let the site show any more dialogs. If you see that, you can check it and then OK the dialog so it doesn't come back. Here's what that looks like from another thread: https://support.cdn.mozilla.net/media/uploads/images/dba.png What's going on in your Firefox at the moment: can you start it up without those dialogs coming back? If necessary, we can describe how to remove/hide your previous session history files so that Firefox can't try to open that page again.

Sours: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/
How to fix red screen in Minecraft Windows 10 Edition!(Quick Tips)

WannaCry ransomware attack

worldwide ransomware cyberattack

Wana Decrypt0r screenshot.png

Screenshot of the ransom note left on an infected system

Date12 May – 15 May
(initial outbreak)[1]
Duration4 days
LocationWorldwide
Also known asTransformations:
Wanna → Wana
Cryptor → Crypt0r
Cryptor → Decryptor
Cryptor → Crypt → Cry
Addition of ""
Short names:
Wanna → WN → W
Cry → CRY
TypeCyberattack
ThemeRansomware encrypting files with $– USD demand (via bitcoin)
CauseWannaCry worm
Outcome
ArrestsNone
SuspectsLazarus Group
AccusedTwo North Koreans indicted
ConvictionsNone

The WannaCry ransomware attack was a worldwidecyberattack in May by the WannaCry ransomwarecryptoworm, which targeted computers running the Microsoft Windowsoperating system by encrypting data and demanding ransom payments in the Bitcoincryptocurrency.[5] It propagated through EternalBlue, an exploit developed by the United States National Security Agency (NSA) for older Windows systems. EternalBlue was stolen and leaked by a group called The Shadow Brokers at least a year prior to the attack. While Microsoft had released patches previously to close the exploit, much of WannaCry's spread was from organizations that had not applied these, or were using older Windows systems that were past their end-of-life. These patches were imperative to an organization's cyber-security but many were not applied because of neglect, ignorance, mismanagement, or a misunderstanding about their importance. Some have claimed a need for 24/7 operation, aversion to risking having formerly working applications breaking because of patch changes, lack of personnel or time to install them, or other reasons.

The attack began at UTC on 12 May and was halted a few hours later at UTC by the registration of a kill switch discovered by Marcus Hutchins. The kill switch prevented already infected computers from being encrypted or further spreading WannaCry.[6] The attack was estimated to have affected more than , computers across countries, with total damages ranging from hundreds of millions to billions of dollars. Security experts believed from preliminary evaluation of the worm that the attack originated from North Korea or agencies working for the country.

In December , the United States and United Kingdom formally asserted that North Korea was behind the attack.[7]

A new variant of WannaCry forced Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) to temporarily shut down several of its chip-fabrication factories in August The virus spread to 10, machines in TSMC's most advanced facilities.[8]

Description[edit]

WannaCry is a ransomwarecryptoworm, which targeted computers running the Microsoft Windowsoperating system by encrypting (locking) data and demanding ransom payments in the Bitcoincryptocurrency. The worm is also known as WannaCrypt,[9] Wana Decrypt0r ,[10] WanaCrypt0r ,[11] and Wanna Decryptor.[12] It is considered a network worm because it also includes a transport mechanism to automatically spread itself. This transport code scans for vulnerable systems, then uses the EternalBlue exploit to gain access, and the DoublePulsar tool to install and execute a copy of itself.[13] WannaCry versions 0, 1, and 2 were created using Microsoft Visual C++ [14]

EternalBlue is an exploit of Microsoft's implementation of their Server Message Block (SMB) protocol released by The Shadow Brokers. Much of the attention and comment around the event was occasioned by the fact that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) (from whom the exploit was likely stolen) had already discovered the vulnerability, but used it to create an exploit for its own offensive work, rather than report it to Microsoft.[15][16] Microsoft eventually discovered the vulnerability, and on Tuesday, 14 March , they issued security bulletin MS, which detailed the flaw and announced that patches had been released for all Windows versions that were currently supported at that time, these being Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows , Windows 10, Windows Server , Windows Server R2, Windows Server , and Windows Server [17]

DoublePulsar is a backdoor tool, also released by The Shadow Brokers on 14 April Starting from 21 April , security researchers reported that there were tens of thousands of computers with the DoublePulsar backdoor installed.[18] By 25 April, reports estimated that the number of infected computers could be up to several hundred thousand, with numbers increasing every day.[19][20] The WannaCry code can take advantage of any existing DoublePulsar infection, or installs it itself.[13][21][22] On 9 May , private cybersecurity company RiskSense released code on GitHub with the stated purpose of allowing legal white hat penetration testers to test the CVE exploit on unpatched systems.[citation needed]

When executed, the WannaCry malware first checks the kill switch domain name; if it is not found, then the ransomware encrypts the computer's data,[23][24][25] then attempts to exploit the SMB vulnerability to spread out to random computers on the Internet,[26] and laterally to computers on the same network.[27] As with other modern ransomware, the payload displays a message informing the user that their files have been encrypted, and demands a payment of around US$ in bitcoin within three days, or US$ within seven days,[24][28] warning that "you have not so enough time." Three hardcoded bitcoin addresses, or wallets, are used to receive the payments of victims. As with all such wallets, their transactions and balances are publicly accessible even though the cryptocurrency wallet owners remain unknown.[29]

Several organizations released detailed technical write-ups of the malware, including a senior security analyst at RiskSense,[30][31] Microsoft,[32]Cisco,[13]Malwarebytes,[26]Symantec and McAfee.[27]

Attack[edit]

The attack began on Friday, 12 May ,[33][34] with evidence pointing to an initial infection in Asia at UTC.[33][35] The initial infection was likely through an exposed vulnerable SMB port,[36] rather than email phishing as initially assumed.[33] Within a day the code was reported to have infected more than , computers in over countries.[37][38]

Organizations that had not installed Microsoft's security update from March were affected by the attack.[39] Those still running unsupported versions of Microsoft Windows, such as Windows XP and Windows Server [40][41] were at particularly high risk because no security patches had been released since April for Windows XP (with the exception of one emergency patch released in May ) and July for Windows Server [9] A Kaspersky Lab study reported, however, that less than percent of the affected computers were running Windows XP, and that 98 percent of the affected computers were running Windows 7.[9][42] In a controlled testing environment, the cybersecurity firm Kryptos Logic found that it was unable to infect a Windows XP system with WannaCry using just the exploits, as the payload failed to load, or caused the operating system to crash rather than actually execute and encrypt files. However, when executed manually, WannaCry could still operate on Windows XP.[43][44][45]

Defensive response[edit]

Experts quickly advised affected users against paying the ransom due to no reports of people getting their data back after payment and as high revenues would encourage more of such campaigns.[46][47][48] As of 14 June , after the attack had subsided, a total of payments totaling US$, ( XBT) had been transferred.[49]

The day after the initial attack in May, Microsoft released out-of-band security updates for end of life products Windows XP, Windows Server and Windows 8; these patches had been created in February of that year following a tip off about the vulnerability in January of that year.[50][41] Organizations were advised to patch Windows and plug the vulnerability in order to protect themselves from the cyber attack.[51] The head of Microsoft's Cyber Defense Operations Center, Adrienne Hall, said that "Due to the elevated risk for destructive cyber-attacks at this time, we made the decision to take this action because applying these updates provides further protection against potential attacks with characteristics similar to WannaCrypt [alternative name to WannaCry]".[52][53]

Researcher Marcus Hutchins[54][55] discovered the kill switch domain hardcoded in the malware.[56][57][58] Registering a domain name for a DNS sinkhole stopped the attack spreading as a worm, because the ransomware only encrypted the computer's files if it was unable to connect to that domain, which all computers infected with WannaCry before the website's registration had been unable to do. While this did not help already infected systems, it severely slowed the spread of the initial infection and gave time for defensive measures to be deployed worldwide, particularly in North America and Asia, which had not been attacked to the same extent as elsewhere.[59][60][61][62][63] On 14 May, a first variant of WannaCry appeared with a new and second[64] kill-switch registered by Matt Suiche on the same day. This was followed by a second variant with the third and last kill-switch on 15 May, which was registered by Check Point threat intelligence analysts.[65][66] A few days later, a new version of WannaCry was detected that lacked the kill switch altogether.[67][68][69][70]

On 19 May, it was reported that hackers were trying to use a Mirai botnet variant to effect a distributed denial-of-service attack on WannaCry's kill-switch domain with the intention of knocking it offline.[71] On 22 May, Hutchins protected the domain by switching to a cached version of the site, capable of dealing with much higher traffic loads than the live site.[72]

Separately, researchers from University College London and Boston University reported that their PayBreak system could defeat WannaCry and several other families of ransomware by recovering the keys used to encrypt the user's data.[73][74]

It was discovered that Windows encryption APIs used by WannaCry may not completely clear the prime numbers used to generate the payload's private keys from the memory, making it potentially possible to retrieve the required key if they had not yet been overwritten or cleared from resident memory. The key is kept in the memory if the WannaCry process has not been killed and the computer has not been rebooted after being infected.[75] This behaviour was used by a French researcher to develop a tool known as WannaKey, which automates this process on Windows XP systems.[76][77][78] This approach was iterated upon by a second tool known as Wanakiwi, which was tested to work on Windows 7 and Server R2 as well.[79]

Within four days of the initial outbreak, new infections had slowed to a trickle due to these responses.[80]

Attribution[edit]

Linguistic analysis of the ransom notes indicated the authors were likely fluent in Chinese[81] and proficient in English, as the versions of the notes in those languages were probably human-written while the rest seemed to be machine-translated.[82][83] According to an analysis by the FBI's Cyber Behavioral Analysis Center, the computer that created the ransomware language files had Hangul language fonts installed, as evidenced by the presence of the "\fcharset" Rich Text Format tag.[14] Metadata in the language files also indicated that the computers that created the ransomware were set to UTC+, used in Korea.[14]

A Google security researcher[84][85] initially posted a tweet[86] referencing code similarities between WannaCry and previous malware. The cybersecurity companies[87]Kaspersky Lab and Symantec have both said the code has some similarities with that previously used by the Lazarus Group[88] (believed to have carried out the cyberattack on Sony Pictures in and a Bangladesh bank heist in —and linked to North Korea).[88] This could also be either simple re-use of code by another group[89] or an attempt to shift blame—as in a cyber false flag operation;[88] but a leaked internal NSA memo is alleged to have also linked the creation of the worm to North Korea.[90]Brad Smith, the president of Microsoft, said he believed North Korea was the originator of the WannaCry attack,[91] and the UK's National Cyber Security Centre reached the same conclusion.[92]

On 18 December , the United States Government formally announced that it publicly considers North Korea to be the main culprit behind the WannaCry attack.[93]PresidentTrump's Homeland Security Advisor, Tom Bossert, wrote an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal about this charge, saying "We do not make this allegation lightly. It is based on evidence."[94] In a press conference the following day, Bossert said that the evidence indicates that Kim Jong-un had given the order to launch the malware attack.[95] Bossert said that Canada, New Zealand and Japan agree with the United States' assessment of the evidence that links the attack to North Korea,[96] while the United Kingdom's Foreign and Commonwealth Office says it also stands behind the United States' assertion.[97]

North Korea, however, denied being responsible for the cyberattack.[98][99]

On 6 September , the US Department of Justice (DoJ) announced formal charges against Park Jin-hyok for involvement in the Sony Pictures hack of The DoJ contended that Park was a North Korean hacker working as part of a team of experts for the North Korean Reconnaissance General Bureau. The Department of Justice asserted this team also had been involved in the WannaCry attack, among other activities.[][]

Impact[edit]

The ransomware campaign was unprecedented in scale according to Europol,[37] which estimates that around , computers were infected across countries. According to Kaspersky Lab, the four most affected countries were Russia, Ukraine, India and Taiwan.[]

One of the largest agencies struck by the attack was the National Health Service hospitals in England and Scotland,[][] and up to 70, devices&#;– including computers, MRI scanners, blood-storage refrigerators and theatre equipment&#;– may have been affected.[] On 12 May, some NHS services had to turn away non-critical emergencies, and some ambulances were diverted.[][] In , thousands of computers in 42 separate NHS trusts in England were reported to be still running Windows XP.[40] In a report by Members of Parliament concluded that all NHS hospitals or other organizations checked in the wake of the WannaCry attack still failed cybersecurity checks.[][] NHS hospitals in Wales and Northern Ireland were unaffected by the attack.[][]

Nissan Motor Manufacturing UK in Tyne and Wear, England, halted production after the ransomware infected some of their systems. Renault also stopped production at several sites in an attempt to stop the spread of the ransomware.[][] Spain's Telefónica, FedEx and Deutsche Bahn were hit, along with many other countries and companies worldwide.[][][]

The attack's impact is said to be relatively low compared to other potential attacks of the same type and could have been much worse had Hutchins not discovered that a kill switch had been built in by its creators[][] or if it had been specifically targeted on highly critical infrastructure, like nuclear power plants, dams or railway systems.[][]

According to cyber-risk-modeling firm Cyence, economic losses from the cyber attack could reach up to US$4 billion, with other groups estimating the losses to be in the hundreds of millions.[]

Affected organizations[edit]

The following is an alphabetical list of organisations confirmed to have been affected:

  • Andhra Pradesh Police, India[]
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece[][]
  • Automobile Dacia, Romania[]
  • Boeing Commercial Airplanes[]
  • Cambrian College, Canada[]
  • Chinese public security bureau[]
  • CJ CGV (a cinema chain)[]
  • Dalian Maritime University[]
  • Deutsche Bahn[]
  • Dharmais Hospital, Indonesia[]
  • Faculty Hospital, Nitra, Slovakia[]
  • FedEx[]
  • Garena Blade and Soul[]
  • Guilin University of Aerospace Technology[]
  • Guilin University of Electronic Technology[]
  • Harapan Kita Hospital, Indonesia[]
  • Hezhou University[]
  • Hitachi[]
  • Honda[]
  • Instituto Nacional de Salud, Colombia[]
  • Lakeridge Health, Canada[]
  • LAKS, Netherlands[]
  • LATAM Airlines Group[]
  • MegaFon[]
  • Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation[]
  • National Health Service (England)[][][]
  • NHS Scotland[][]
  • Nissan Motor Manufacturing UK[]
  • O2, Germany[][]
  • Petrobrás[]
  • PetroChina[][]
  • Portugal Telecom[]
  • Pulse FM[]
  • Q-Park[]
  • Renault[]
  • Russian Railways[]
  • Sandvik[]
  • Justice Court of São Paulo[]
  • Saudi Telecom Company[]
  • Sberbank[]
  • Shandong University[]
  • State Governments of India
  • Suzhou Vehicle Administration[]
  • Sun Yat-sen University, China[]
  • Telefónica, Spain[]
  • Telenor Hungary, Hungary[]
  • Telkom (South Africa)[]
  • Timrå Municipality, Sweden[]
  • TSMC, Taiwan[]
  • Universitas Jember, Indonesia[]
  • University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy[]
  • University of Montreal, Canada[]
  • Vivo, Brazil[]

Reactions[edit]

A number of experts highlighted the NSA's non-disclosure of the underlying vulnerability, and their loss of control over the EternalBlue attack tool that exploited it. Edward Snowden said that if the NSA had "privately disclosed the flaw used to attack hospitals when they found it, not when they lost it, the attack may not have happened".[] British cybersecurity expert Graham Cluley also sees "some culpability on the part of the U.S. intelligence services". According to him and others "they could have done something ages ago to get this problem fixed, and they didn't do it". He also said that despite obvious uses for such tools to spy on people of interest, they have a duty to protect their countries' citizens.[] Others have also commented that this attack shows that the practice of intelligence agencies to stockpile exploits for offensive purposes rather than disclosing them for defensive purposes may be problematic.[] Microsoft president and chief legal officer Brad Smith wrote, "Repeatedly, exploits in the hands of governments have leaked into the public domain and caused widespread damage. An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the U.S. military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen."[][][] Russian President Vladimir Putin placed the responsibility of the attack on U.S. intelligence services, for having created EternalBlue.[]

On 17 May , United States bipartisan lawmakers introduced the PATCH Act[] that aims to have exploits reviewed by an independent board to "balance the need to disclose vulnerabilities with other national security interests while increasing transparency and accountability to maintain public trust in the process".[]

On 15 June , the United States Congress was to hold a hearing on the attack.[] Two subpanels of the House Science Committee were to hear the testimonies from various individuals working in the government and non-governmental sector about how the US can improve its protection mechanisms for its systems against similar attacks in the future.[]

Marcus Hutchins, a cybersecurity researcher, working in loose collaboration with UK's National Cyber Security Centre,[][] researched the malware and discovered a "kill switch".[55] Later globally dispersed security researchers collaborated online to developopen source tools[][] that allow for decryption without payment under some circumstances.[] Snowden states that when "NSA-enabled ransomware eats the Internet, help comes from researchers, not spy agencies" and asks why this is the case.[][][]

Adam Segal, director of the digital and cyberspace policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations, stated that "the patching and updating systems are broken, basically, in the private sector and in government agencies".[] In addition, Segal said that governments' apparent inability to secure vulnerabilities "opens a lot of questions about backdoors and access to encryption that the government argues it needs from the private sector for security".[]Arne Schönbohm, president of Germany's Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), stated that "the current attacks show how vulnerable our digital society is. It's a wake-up call for companies to finally take IT security [seriously]".[]

United Kingdom[edit]

The effects of the attack also had political implications; in the United Kingdom, the impact on the National Health Service quickly became political, with claims that the effects were exacerbated by Government underfunding of the NHS; in particular, the NHS ceased its paid Custom Support arrangement to continue receiving support for unsupported Microsoft software used within the organization, including Windows XP.[]Home SecretaryAmber Rudd refused to say whether patient data had been backed up, and Shadow Health SecretaryJon Ashworth accused Health SecretaryJeremy Hunt of refusing to act on a critical note from Microsoft, the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the National Crime Agency that had been received two months previously.[]

Others argued that hardware and software vendors often fail to account for future security flaws, selling systems that − due to their technical design and market incentives − eventually won't be able to properly receive and apply patches.[]

The NHS denied that it was still using XP, claiming only % of devices within the organization ran Windows XP.[][43] The cost of the attack to the NHS was estimated as £92 million in disruption to services and IT upgrades.[]

After the attack, NHS Digital refused to finance the estimated £1 billion to meet the Cyber Essentials Plus standard, an information security certification organized by the UK NCSC, saying this would not constitute "value for money", and that it had invested over £60 million and planned "to spend a further £ [million] over the next two years" to address key cyber security weaknesses.[]

email scam[edit]

In late June, hundreds of computer users reported receiving an email claiming to be from the developers of WannaCry.[] The email threatened to destroy the victims' data unless they sent BTC to the Bitcoin address of the hackers. This also happened in [citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"The WannaCry ransomware attack was temporarily halted. But it's not over yet". 15 May Archived from the original on 28 October Retrieved 25 May
  2. ^"Ransomware attack still looms in Australia as Government warns WannaCry threat not over". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 14 May Archived from the original on 15 May Retrieved 15 May
  3. ^Cameron, Dell (13 May ). "Today's Massive Ransomware Attack Was Mostly Preventable; Here's How To Avoid It". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on 9 April Retrieved 13 May
  4. ^"Shadow Brokers threaten to release Windows 10 hacking tools". The Express Tribune. 31 May Archived from the original on 10 July Retrieved 31 May
  5. ^"Two years after WannaCry, a million computers remain at risk". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 16 January
  6. ^"What is the domain name that stopped WannaCry?". 15 May
  7. ^"Cyber-attack: US and UK blame North Korea for WannaCry". BBC News. 19 December Archived from the original on 8 February Retrieved 18 February
  8. ^"TSMC Chip Maker Blames WannaCry Malware for Production Halt". The Hacker News. Archived from the original on 9 August Retrieved 7 August
  9. ^ abcMSRC Team (13 May ). "Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks". Microsoft. Archived from the original on 21 May Retrieved 13 May
  10. ^Jakub Kroustek (12 May ). "Avast reports on WanaCrypt0r ransomware that infected NHS and Telefonica". Avast Security News. Avast Software, Inc. Archived from the original on 5 May Retrieved 14 May
  11. ^Fox-Brewster, Thomas. "An NSA Cyber Weapon Might Be Behind A Massive Global Ransomware Outbreak". Forbes. Archived from the original on 28 June Retrieved 12 May
  12. ^Woollaston, Victoria. "Wanna Decryptor: what is the 'atom bomb of ransomware' behind the NHS attack?". WIRED UK. Archived from the original on 17 March Retrieved 13 May
  13. ^ abc"Player 3 Has Entered the Game: Say Hello to 'WannaCry'". blog.talosintelligence.com. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 16 May
  14. ^ abcShields, Nathan P. (8 June ). "Criminal Complaint". United States Department of Justice. Archived from the original on 6 September Retrieved 6 September
  15. ^"NHS cyber attack: Edward Snowden says NSA should have prevented cyber attack". The Independent. Archived from the original on 16 May Retrieved 13 May
  16. ^Graham, Chris (13 May ). "NHS cyber attack: Everything you need to know about 'biggest ransomware' offensive in history". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 13 May
  17. ^"NSA-leaking Shadow Brokers just dumped its most damaging release yet". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 15 April
  18. ^Goodin, Dan. "10, Windows computers may be infected by advanced NSA backdoor". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 14 May
  19. ^Goodin, Dan. "NSA backdoor detected on >55, Windows boxes can now be remotely removed". Ars Technica. Retrieved 14 May
  20. ^Broersma, Matthew. "NSA Malware 'Infects Nearly , Systems'". Silicon. Archived from the original on 6 May Retrieved 14 May
  21. ^Cameron, Dell (13 May ). "Today's Massive Ransomware Attack Was Mostly Preventable; Here's How To Avoid It". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on 9 April Retrieved 15 May
  22. ^"How One Simple Trick Just Put Out That Huge Ransomware Fire". Forbes. 24 April Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 15 May
  23. ^"Russian-linked cyber gang blamed for NHS computer hack using bug stolen from US spy agency". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 12 May Retrieved 12 May
  24. ^ ab"What you need to know about the WannaCry Ransomware". Symantec Security Response. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 14 May
  25. ^Bilefsky, Dan; Perlroth, Nicole (12 May ). "Hackers Hit Dozens of Countries Exploiting Stolen N.S.A. Tool". The New York Times. ISSN&#; Archived from the original on 12 May Retrieved 12 May
  26. ^ abClark, Zammis (13 May ). "The worm that spreads WanaCrypt0r". Malwarebytes Labs. malwarebytes.com. Archived from the original on 17 May Retrieved 13 May
  27. ^ abSamani, Raj (12 May ). "An Analysis of the WANNACRY Ransomware outbreak". McAfee. Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 13 May
  28. ^Thomas, Andrea; Grove, Thomas; Gross, Jenny (13 May ). "More Cyberattack Victims Emerge as Agencies Search for Clues". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN&#; Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 14 May
  29. ^Collins, Keith. "Watch as these bitcoin wallets receive ransomware payments from the global cyberattack". Quartz. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 14 May
  30. ^"MS (SMB RCE) Metasploit Scanner Detection Module". @zerosum0x0. @zerosum0x0. 18 April Archived from the original on 25 September Retrieved 18 April
  31. ^"DoublePulsar Initial SMB Backdoor Ring 0 Shellcode Analysis". @zerosum0x0. @zerosum0x0. 21 April Archived from the original on 12 August Retrieved 21 April
  32. ^"WannaCrypt ransomware worm targets out-of-date systems". TechNet. Microsoft. 13 May Archived from the original on 11 February Retrieved 20 May
  33. ^ abcBrenner, Bill (16 May ). "WannaCry: the ransomware worm that didn't arrive on a phishing hook". Naked Security. Sophos. Archived from the original on 11 July Retrieved 18 May
  34. ^Newman, Lily Hay (12 May ). "The Ransomware Meltdown Experts Warned About Is Here". Wired. Archived from the original on 19 May Retrieved 13 May
  35. ^Yuzifovich, Yuriy. "WannaCry: views from the DNS frontline". Security and Data Science. nominum. Archived from the original on 21 May Retrieved 18 May
  36. ^Goodin, Dan. "An NSA-derived ransomware worm is shutting down computers worldwide". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on 12 May Retrieved 14 May
  37. ^ ab"Cyber-attack: Europol says it was unprecedented in scale". BBC News. 13 May Archived from the original on 14 May Retrieved 13 May
  38. ^"'Unprecedented' cyberattack hits , in at least countries, and the threat is escalating". CNBC. 14 May Archived from the original on 15 May Retrieved 16 May
  39. ^"WannaCry Ransomware Attack Hits Victims With Microsoft SMB Exploit". eWeek. Retrieved 13 May
  40. ^ ab"NHS Hospitals Are Running Thousands of Computers on Unsupported Windows XP". Motherboard. Archived from the original on 18 May Retrieved 13 May
  41. ^ ab"Microsoft issues 'highly unusual' Windows XP patch to prevent massive ransomware attack". The Verge. Vox Media. 13 May Archived from the original on 14 May Retrieved 13 May
  42. ^Brandom, Russell (19 May ). "Almost all WannaCry victims were running Windows 7". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 16 November Retrieved 10 December
  43. ^ abBrandom, Russell (30 May ). "Windows XP computers were mostly immune to WannaCry". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 11 February Retrieved 10 December
  44. ^"WannaCry: Two Weeks and 16 Million Averted Ransoms Later". Kryptos Logic. Archived from the original on 30 May Retrieved 30 May
  45. ^"Παγκόσμιος τρόμος: Πάνω από χώρες "χτύπησε" ο WannaCry που ζητάει λύτρα!". newsit.gr. 13 May Archived from the original on 16 November Retrieved 16 November
  46. ^Reynolds, Matt (17 May ). "Ransomware attack hits , computers across the globe". New Scientist. Archived from the original on 19 April Retrieved 10 December
  47. ^Baraniuk, Chris (15 May ). "Should you pay the WannaCry ransom?". BBC News. Archived from the original on 29 November Retrieved 10 December
  48. ^Palmer, Danny (22 May ). "Ransomware: WannaCry was basic, next time could be much worse". ZDNet. Archived from the original on 29 November Retrieved 10 December
  49. ^Collins, Keith (13 May ). "Watch as these bitcoin wallets receive ransomware payments from the ongoing global cyberattack". Quartz. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 10 December
  50. ^Thompson, Iain (16 May ). "While Microsoft griped about NSA exploit stockpiles, it stockpiled patches: Friday's WinXP fix was built in February". The Register. Archived from the original on 22 December Retrieved 19 December
  51. ^"Global Reports of WannaCry Ransomware Attacks – Defensorum". Defensorum. 18 August Archived from the original on 17 October Retrieved 16 October
  52. ^Hern, Alex (14 June ). "WannaCry attacks prompt Microsoft to release Windows updates for older versions". The Guardian. ISSN&#; Archived from the original on 14 June Retrieved 14 June
  53. ^"Microsoft rushes out patch for Windows XP to prevent another WannaCry attack via a Shadow Brokers release". Computing.com. 14 June ISSN&#; Archived from the original on 14 June Retrieved 14 June
  54. ^"'Just doing my bit': The 22yo who blocked the WannaCry cyberattack". ABC News. 16 May Archived from the original on 17 May Retrieved 17 May
  55. ^ abMalwareTech (13 May ). "How to Accidentally Stop a Global Cyber Attacks". Archived from the original on 14 May Retrieved 14 May
  56. ^Bodkin, Henry; Henderson, Barney; Donnelly, Laura; Mendick, Robert; Farmer, Ben; Graham, Chris (12 May ). "Government under pressure after NHS crippled in global cyber attack as weekend of chaos looms". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 27 March Retrieved 5 April
  57. ^Thomson, Iain (13 May ). "74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+". The Register. Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 14 May
  58. ^Khomami, Nadia; Solon, Olivia (13 May ). "'Accidental hero' halts ransomware attack and warns: this is not over". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 23 May Retrieved 13 May
  59. ^Newman, Lily Hay. "How an Accidental 'Kill Switch' Slowed Friday's Massive Ransomware Attack". Wired Security. Archived from the original on 14 May Retrieved 14 May
  60. ^Solon, Olivia (13 May ). "'Accidental hero' finds kill switch to stop spread of ransomware cyber-attack". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 23 May Retrieved 13 May
  61. ^Foxx, Chris (13 May ). "Global cyber-attack: Security blogger halts ransomware 'by accident'". BBC. Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 13 May
  62. ^Kan, Micael (12 May ). "A 'kill switch' is slowing the spread of WannaCry ransomware". PC World. Archived from the original on 16 May Retrieved 13 May
  63. ^"How an Accidental 'Kill Switch' Slowed Friday's Massive Ransomware Attack". 12 May Archived from the original on 22 December Retrieved 19 December
  64. ^Wong, Joon Ian. "Just two domain names now stand between the world and global ransomware chaos". Quartz. Archived from the original on 19 March Retrieved 25 March
  65. ^"The Hours of WannaCry". 17 May Archived from the original on 26 March Retrieved 25 March
  66. ^"WannaCry – New Kill-Switch, New Sinkhole". Check Point Software Blog. 15 May Archived from the original on 11 April Retrieved 11 April
  67. ^Khandelwal, Swati. "It's Not Over, WannaCry Ransomware Just Arrived With No 'Kill-Switch'". The Hacker News. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 14 May
  68. ^Shieber, Jonathan. "Companies, governments brace for a second round of cyberattacks in WannaCry's wake". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 14 May
  69. ^Chan, Sewell; Scott, Mark (14 May ). "Cyberattack's Impact Could Worsen in 'Second Wave' of Ransomware". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 14 April Retrieved 14 May
  70. ^"Warning: Blockbuster 'WannaCry' malware could just be getting started". NBC News. Archived from the original on 13 April Retrieved 14 May
  71. ^Greenberg, Andy (19 May ). "Botnets Are Trying to Reignite the Ransomware Outbreak". WIRED. Archived from the original on 22 May Retrieved 22 May
  72. ^Gibbs, Samuel (22 May ). "WannaCry hackers still trying to revive attack says accidental hero". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 4 March Retrieved 22 May
  73. ^"Protection from Ransomware like WannaCry". College of Engineering. Boston University. Archived from the original on 31 May Retrieved 19 May
  74. ^Kolodenker, Eugene (16 May ). "PayBreak able to defeat WannaCry/WannaCryptor ransomware". Information Security Research & Education. Bentham's Gaze. University College London. Archived from the original on 16 May Retrieved 19 May
  75. ^Suiche, Matt (19 May ). "WannaCry — Decrypting files with WanaKiwi + Demos". Comae Technologies. Archived from the original on 8 August Retrieved 11 February
  76. ^"Windows XP hit by WannaCry ransomware? This tool could decrypt your infected files". ZDNet. Archived from the original on 23 May Retrieved 30 May
  77. ^"Windows XP PCs infected by WannaCry can be decrypted without paying ransom". Ars Technica. 18 May Archived from the original on 31 May Retrieved 30 May
  78. ^Greenberg, Andy (18 May ). "A WannaCry flaw could help some windows XP users get files back". Wired. Archived from the original on 18 May Retrieved 18 May
  79. ^"More people infected by recent WCry worm can unlock PCs without paying ransom". Ars Technica. 19 May Archived from the original on 22 May Retrieved 30 May
  80. ^Volz, Dustin (17 May ). "Cyber attack eases, hacking group threatens to sell code". Reuters. https://www.reuters.com. Archived from the original on 21 May Retrieved 21 May
  81. ^"WannaCry Ransomware Attacks Up 53% Since January ". NetSec.News. 31 March Archived from the original on 15 April Retrieved 7 April
  82. ^Leyden, John (26 May ). "WannaCrypt ransomware note likely written by Google Translate-using Chinese speakers". The Register. Archived from the original on 26 May Retrieved 26 May
  83. ^Condra, Jon; Costello, John; Chu, Sherman (25 May ). "Linguistic Analysis of WannaCry Ransomware Messages Suggests Chinese-Speaking Authors". Flashpoint. Archived from the original on 27 May
  84. ^Greenberg, Andy (15 May ). "The Ransomware Outbreak Has a Possible Link to North Korea". Wired. Archived from the original on 23 March Retrieved 25 March
  85. ^"Google Researcher Finds Link Between WannaCry Attacks and North Korea". The Hacker News — Cyber Security and Hacking News Website. Archived from the original on 25 March Retrieved 25 March
  86. ^Mehta, Neel [@neelmehta] (15 May ). "9c7ca1ca87dd1babc @ 0x, 0x40F ac21c8adc4bd7aa8d8 @ 0xba0, 0xAA4 #WannaCryptAttribution" (Tweet) &#; via Twitter.
  87. ^McMillan, Robert (16 May ). "Researchers Identify Clue Connecting Ransomware Assault to Group Tied to North Korea". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 23 March Retrieved 25 March
  88. ^ abcSolong, Olivia (15 May ). "WannaCry ransomware has links to North Korea, cybersecurity experts say". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 16 May Retrieved 16 May
  89. ^Talmadge, Eric (19 May ). "Experts question North Korea role in WannaCry cyberattack". independent.ie. AP. Archived from the original on 23 May Retrieved 22 May
  90. ^Nakashima, Ellen. "The NSA has linked the WannaCry computer worm to North Korea". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 4 June Retrieved 15 June
  91. ^Harley, Nicola (14 October ). "North Korea behind WannaCry attack which crippled the NHS after stealing US cyber weapons, Microsoft chief claims". The Telegraph. ISSN&#; Archived from the original on 14 October Retrieved 14 October
  92. ^Hern, Alex (26 October ). "NHS could have avoided WannaCry hack with basic IT security' says report". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 26 October Retrieved 26 October
  93. ^Nakashima, Ellen (18 December ). "U.S. declares North Korea carried out massive WannaCry cyberattack". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 19 December Retrieved 18 December
  94. ^Bossert, Thomas P. (18 December ). "It's Official: North Korea Is Behind WannaCry". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 19 December Retrieved 18 December
  95. ^Uchill, Joe (19 December ). "WH: Kim Jong Un behind massive WannaCry malware attack". The Hill. Archived from the original on 22 December Retrieved 19 December
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WannaCry_ransomware_attack

Virus 2017 screen red

Answer

It's a common scam that you could have ended with the Task Manager. Now you must consider everything on your computer has been compromised. Passwords, PIN numbers, financial account information. A clean install of Windows is the best option, but at the very least, the following.

From Quietman, see: I have been hackedWhat should I do?
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t//answers-to-common-security-questions-best-practices/?p=


And this from the FTC:


Tech Support Scams
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/tech-support-scams

Next, follow the instructions here even if the pop up is gone.
http://malwaretips.com/blogs/remove-tech-support-scam-popups/


Also run this tool.


SuperAntiSpyware (Free version)
http://www.superantispyware.com/


Please read:

PSA: Tech Support Scams Pop-Ups on the Rise
https://blog.malwarebytes.org/fraud-scam//11/psa-tech-support-scams-pop-ups-on-the-rise/

Breaking down a notably sophisticated tech support scam M.O.
https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mmpc//03/02/breaking-down-a-notably-sophisticated-tech-support-scam-m-o/

===== ===== ===== ===== ===== ===== ===== ===== ===== =====
&#; Avoid a post. Backup your data. &#;

Bruce Hagen
MVP: &#;
&#; Present
Imperial Beach, CA

Report abuse

Harassment is any behavior intended to disturb or upset a person or group of people. Threats include any threat of suicide, violence, or harm to another. Any content of an adult theme or inappropriate to a community web site. Any image, link, or discussion of nudity. Any behavior that is insulting, rude, vulgar, desecrating, or showing disrespect. Any behavior that appears to violate End user license agreements, including providing product keys or links to pirated software. Unsolicited bulk mail or bulk advertising. Any link to or advocacy of virus, spyware, malware, or phishing sites. Any other inappropriate content or behavior as defined by the Terms of Use or Code of Conduct. Any image, link, or discussion related to child pornography, child nudity, or other child abuse or exploitation.
Details (required):
characters remaining

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

Sours: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/protect/forum/all/red-screen-saying-i-was-infected-with-malware/31eedaacbf5b
Windows 10 Red Screen Of Death (Idea)

.

You will also be interested:

.



802 803 804 805 806