Progress bar powershell

Progress bar powershell DEFAULT

Write-Progress

Display a progress bar.

Syntax Write-Progress [-activity] string [-status] string [[-id] int] [-percentComplete int] [-secondsRemaining int] [-currentOperation string] [-parentId int] [-completed] [-sourceId int] [CommonParameters] Key -activity string A string that describes the activity about which progress is being reported. Will appear as the first heading above the progress bar. -status string A string that describes current state of the activity about which progress is being reported. Will appear as the second heading above the progress bar. -id int The activity identifier for this progress record. -percentComplete int The percentage of the activity that is completed. Use the value -1 if the percentage is unknown or not applicable. -secondsRemaining int The projected number of seconds remaining until the activity is completed. Use the value -1 if the number of seconds remaining is unknown or not applicable. -currentOperation string Describes the operation that is currently taking place. -parentId int The parent activity of the current activity. Use the value -1 if the current activity has no parent activity. -completed Hide the progress bar, to indicate the activity is complete. -sourceId int Identify the source of the record

Write-Progress displays a progress bar in a PowerShell command window that depicts the status of a running command or script.

Examples

Display progress of a for loop:

PS C:\> for($i = 1; $i -lt 101; $i++ ) {for($j=0;$j -lt 10000;$j++) {} write-progress "Search in Progress" "% Complete:" -perc $i;}

Display progress while searching through the system event log messages:

PS C:\> $events = get-eventlog -logname system
PS C:\> $events | foreach-object -begin {clear-host;$i=0;$out=""} -process {if($_.message -like "*bios*") {$out=$out + $_.Message}; $i = $i+1; write-progress -activity "Searching Events" -status "Progress:" -percentcomplete ($i/$events.count*100)} -end {$out}

“I don't like to write, but I love to have written” ~ Michael Kanin

Related PowerShell Cmdlets:

Write-Debug - Write a debug message to the host display.
Write-Error - Write an object to the error pipeline.
Write-Host - Display objects through the host user interface.
Write-Information - Write to the information data stream (6).
Write-Output - Write an object to the pipeline.
Write-Verbose - Write a string to the host’s verbose display.
Write-Warning - Write a warning message.


 

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How to write Progress Bar in PowerShell?


When we write a script in PowerShell, users who execute it, expect to see the progress of the script instead of waiting idle and looking at the blank cursor while the script is executing the background task. One way to achieve is to use the Verbose parameter to see the progress but it doesn’t show the graphical progress. To see the graphical progress, you can use Write-Progress cmdlet supported by PowerShell.

Write-Progress cmdlet mainly depends on 3 parameters.

  • Activity − Title of the progress bar or you can mention the activity name that is being performed.

  • Status − Subtitle of the Progress bar. This would be the second line after activity.

  • Percentage Completed − Percentage completed in terms of progress. This should be the integer number.

Check the below example with just the activity parameter and run the code.

Example

for($i=0;$i -le 100; $i++){    Write-Progress -Activity "Counting from 1 to 100"    sleep 1 }

Output

In the above output, you can see that the “Counting from 1 to 100” is the header, and “Progressing” is the default status that we haven’t modified yet. Here you can see there is not progress shown as we haven’t used the Percentage parameter. Now we will modify the Status of the progress bar in the same example.

Example

for($i=0;$i -le 100; $i++){    Write-Progress -Activity "Counting from 1 to 100 " -Status "Counting $i    times"    $i    sleep 1 }

Output

As you can see the above output with the new subtitle but still we don’t see the percentage completed and for that, you need to use the PercentComplete parameter.

$tcount = 100 for($i=0;$i -le $tcount; $i++){    $pcomplete = ($i / $tcount) * 100    Write-Progress -Activity "Counting from 1 to 100" -Status "Counting $i times" -PercentComplete    $pcomplete    $i    sleep 1 }

When you see the output of the above code, you will see the progress bar working.

We now see another example which will help us to get more ideas about the progress bar. In the below example we have used Windows Event command to retrieve the first 10 error logs from each windows event like System, Application, security, etc and while the retrieval process takes a little time, we will use the progress bar to display the growth of the script output.

Example

$Winlogs = (Get-Eventlog -List).LogDisplayName foreach($log in $Winlogs){    try{       $eventlog = Get-EventLog -LogName $log -EntryType Error -ErrorAction Stop| Select -First 10       if($eventlog){          Write-Output "`nLog Name : $log"             for($i=0;$i -le $eventlog.count; $i++){                $perct = ($i / $eventlog.count) * 100                Write-Progress -Activity "Windows Logs Progress" -Status "Displaying Log : $log" -                 PercentComplete $perct             $eventlog[$i]             Sleep 1          }       }    }    catch [Exception]{       Write-Warning "No logs found for $log"    } }

Output

Sours: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/how-to-write-progress-bar-in-powershell
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Using Write-Progress to provide feedback in Powershell

I like my scripts to give feedback to the console to demonstrate progress where possible and Powershell provides a number of cmdlets to do this, one of which is .

The Write-Progress cmdlet displays a progress bar in a Windows PowerShell command window that depicts the status of a running command or script. You can select the indicators that the bar reflects and the text that appears above and below the progress bar.

Source: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh849902.aspx

The progress bar and status messages displayed by float automatically at the top of the page, overlaying whatever text is present. There are several different ways to use some of which may surprise you:

1. You don’t actually need to know how much progress you’ve made to use Write-Progress

Surprisingly, you can use without actually displaying a progress bar. This can be useful if you want to utilise a floating progress notification but have no way of knowing how much progress has been made. For example:

To be explicit about not knowing how much progress to report, you can specify .

2. You can tell an instance of Write-Progress to disappear

If you want a Progress message to disappear while your script continues to do other processing, you can dismiss them using the switch. For example:

3. You can use Write-Progress to count down a number of seconds remaining

This is most useful when your script needs to wait for a predetermined amount of time before proceeding and you want to show the user how long they have left to wait. To do this use the switch. For example:

4. To show a progress bar, just calculate the percentage of work completed

To show a progress bar you use the switch to report a value between 0 and 100. Within a loop you can likely do this using the variables that count the iterations. For a loop, its best to use a counter variable which you increment on each iteration and then the property of your collection for the total. For example:

5. You can show more than one progress bar at a time

Referred to as nested progress bars, you simply need to use the parameter to ensure they are not layered on top of each other. The first progress bar does not need an ID, but you then need to number all subsequent ones sequentially in the order you want them layered.

The following script demonstrates four nested progress bars by displaying a running clock of the current time.

The script ends automatically at midnight (to have it running perpetually, change the last statement to ).

Sours: https://wragg.io/using-write-progress-to-provide-feedback-in-powershell/
powershell part36 (How to use write-progress and write-output and write-host)

Write-Progress

Displays a progress bar within a PowerShell command window.

Syntax

Description

The cmdlet displays a progress bar in a PowerShell command window that depicts the status of a running command or script. You can select the indicators that the bar reflects and the text that appears above and below the progress bar.

Examples

Example 1: Display the progress of a For loop

This command displays the progress of a For loop that counts from 1 to 100.

The cmdlet includes a status bar heading , a status line, and the variable (the counter in the For loop), which indicates the relative completeness of the task.

Example 2: Display the progress of nested For loops

This example displays the progress of two nested For loops, each of which is represented by a progress bar.

The command for the second progress bar includes the Id parameter that distinguishes it from the first progress bar.

Without the Id parameter, the progress bars would be superimposed on each other instead of being displayed one below the other.

Example 3: Display the progress while searching for a string

This command displays the progress of a command to find the string "bios" in the System event log.

The PercentComplete parameter value is calculated by dividing the number of events that have been processed by the total number of events retrieved and then multiplying that result by 100.

Example 4: Display progress for each level of a nested process

In this example you can use the ParentId parameter to have indented output to show parent/child relationships in the progress of each step.

Parameters

-Activity

Specifies the first line of text in the heading above the status bar. This text describes the activity whose progress is being reported.

Type:String
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-Completed

Indicates whether the progress bar is visible. If this parameter is omitted, displays progress information.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-CurrentOperation

Specifies the line of text below the progress bar. This text describes the operation that is currently taking place.

Type:String
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-Id

Specifies an ID that distinguishes each progress bar from the others. Use this parameter when you are creating more than one progress bar in a single command. If the progress bars do not have different IDs, they are superimposed instead of being displayed in a series. Negative values are not allowed.

Type:Int32
Position:2
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-ParentId

Specifies the parent activity of the current activity. Use the value -1 if the current activity has no parent activity.

Type:Int32
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-PercentComplete

Specifies the percentage of the activity that is completed. Use the value -1 if the percentage complete is unknown or not applicable.

Type:Int32
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-SecondsRemaining

Specifies the projected number of seconds remaining until the activity is completed. Use the value -1 if the number of seconds remaining is unknown or not applicable.

Type:Int32
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-SourceId

Specifies the source of the record. You can use this in place of Id but cannot be used with other parameters like ParentId.

Type:Int32
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

-Status

Specifies the second line of text in the heading above the status bar. This text describes current state of the activity.

Type:String
Position:1
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

Inputs

None

You cannot pipe input to this cmdlet.

Outputs

None

does not generate any output.

Notes

If the progress bar does not appear, check the value of the variable. If the value is set to SilentlyContinue, the progress bar is not displayed. For more information about PowerShell preferences, see about_Preference_Variables.

The parameters of the cmdlet correspond to the properties of the System.Management.Automation.ProgressRecord class. For more information, see ProgressRecord Class.

Related Links

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/microsoft.powershell.utility/write-progress

Bar powershell progress

Add a Progress Bar to Your PowerShell Script

 

Summary: Microsoft Scripting Guy Ed Wilson shows you how to add a progress bar to your script.

 

Microsoft Scripting Guy Ed Wilson here. I was sitting in the kitchen reflecting on how much nicer things are nowadays than they used to be even a few years ago. For example, the Scripting Wife and I have a computer in our kitchen. The computer itself is about the size of a small paperback book, and it is hooked up to a nice flat panel monitor. With a wireless keyboard, mouse, and network connection, it is a rather compact installation. Our first kitchen computer was a mini-tower, hooked up to a 15 inch monitor, and it took us several days to cut holes in dry wall, drill holes through wall studs to run category five wire from the upstairs rack to the downstairs kitchen. It was worth the effort because having a computer in the kitchen is super handy around our household. Comparing the amount of work involved, the old installation took several days, and the new installation took only a few minutes.

That same economy of effort also works for scripting progress bars. It is common to display some kind of progress when a script takes a long time to complete. When a user launches the script and nothing happens, one begins to wonder if the script launched correctly. We probably have all had the occasion to start three or four copies of a program that is slow in launching because we clicked and nothing happened. The same principle applies to scripts: if the script will take a long time to run, provide feedback to the user (or even to yourself if you run the script six months from now and you forget that it takes a long time to run.)

Five years ago, I wrote a VBScript script such as the one that follows. It collects a list of all running services, and back then it took a long time to run.

CollectRunningServicesDisplayProgress.vbs

strComputer = “.”

wmiNS = “\root\cimv2”

wmiQuery = “Select name from win32_service where state = ‘running'”

Set stdout = WScript.StdOut

stdout.write “Please wait”

strout = wmiQuery & VbCrLf

Set objWMIService = GetObject(“winmgmts:\\” & strComputer & wmiNS)

Set colItems = objWMIService.ExecQuery(wmiQuery)

For Each objItem in colItems

stdout.Write “.”

strout = strout & objItem.name & VbCrLf

Next

stdout.WriteBlankLines(1)

stdout.write(strOut)

Using the Write-Progress Windows PowerShell cmdlet, I can trim the previous VBScript from 14 lines to six lines of code. One thing that is cool about WMI queries is that the result from Get-WmiObject is a collection. That collection has a count property. Armed with the count property, I can display a progress bar that indicates a percentage of completion of the command. The ProgressDemoWMI.ps1 script is shown here.

ProgressDemoWMI.ps1

$wmiQuery = “Select name from win32_service where state = ‘running'”

$colItems = Get-WmiObject -Query $wmiQuery

For($i = 1; $i -le $colItems.count; $i++)

{ Write-Progress -Activity “Gathering Services” -status “Found Service $i” `

-percentComplete ($i / $colItems.count*100)}

$colItems | Select name

When using the Write-Progress cmdlet, two parameters are required. The first is the activity parameter. The string supplied for this parameter appears on the first line in the progress dialog. The second required parameter is the statusparameter. It appears under the Activity line. The dialog that appears in the following image is shown when the ProgressDemoWMI.ps1 script runs from within the Windows PowerShell ISE.

Image of dialog box that appears when PowerShell script is run in the PowerShell ISE

When the ProgressDemoWMI.ps1 script runs inside the Windows PowerShell console, a green bar appears at the top of the console, and yellow o’s track their way across the console window. This is shown in the following image.

Image of progress bar in PowerShell console

Displaying a percentage of completion is a great progress indicator if you know how many work items exist. Unfortunately, many times you have no idea how many items are in the collection. This is especially true when commands are piped, because there is no way to determine how many items need to be streamed as items are coming over the pipeline.

One solution is to store items in a variable, and then iterate over the items collected in the variable. This is illustrated in the FilesProgressDemo.ps1 script.

FilesProgressDemo.ps1

$files = Get-ChildItem -Path c:\fso

For($i = 1; $i -le $files.count; $i++)

{ Write-Progress -Activity “Collecting files” -status “Finding file $i” `

-percentComplete ($i / $files.count*100)}

$files | Select name

As you can tell, the FilesProgressDemo.ps1 script is nearly identical to the earlier script—the difference is collecting the files instead of services.

That is all there is to displaying a progress indicator.

I invite you to follow me on Twitter and Facebook. If you have any questions, send email to me at [email protected], or post your questions on the Official Scripting Guys Forum. See you tomorrow. Until then, peace.

Ed Wilson, Microsoft Scripting Guy

Sours: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/scripting/add-a-progress-bar-to-your-powershell-script/
Writing progress bars with PowerShell

How to add progress indicators to PowerShell scripts

developers working

You sit, patiently waiting. Staring hopefully at a console screen while the cursor blinks repeatedly. You typed in the command or executed your script as you've done countless times before, and while it's worked in the past, this time the screen simply lingers there while the command processes in the background, and you're still wondering if it's working. If only there was a way to know for sure (hint: There is).

SEE: Incident response policy (TechRepublic Premium)

How many times has this scenario happened to all of us? Likely, too many to count. Microsoft has deemed it important to cue in users and admins to the status of the progress when commands and scripts are executed by including two cmdlets for Microsoft PowerShell (PS). These indicators may be integrated into existing scripts to provide some feedback on the status of a process.

Note: The aim of this article is to inform the script writer of the cmdlets and provide an idea of how each of them may be married to existing scripts. How they are married and to the degree of success will depend on the complexity of the script and the programming skill set of the author. As with anything computing-related, there are multiple ways to get something done. You just need to find what works best for you and your organization.

Write-Verbose

This single cmdlet is simple yet effective in providing a minimal status update, often relying on the inclusion of a single line to the script for each function you wish to be updated about.

Strength: It works with most scripts. It may be included as a single line of code or as several single code lines, one for each status update.

Weakness: Its simplicity also extends to its output capability. Often, only a single line is printed on-screen as the status update. Does not provide a progress bar or percentage complete natively.

Usage:

Write-Verbose -Message "Status Update: Command 01 Completed"

Write-Progress

This is the more robust and often preferred method of providing updates for PS experts. This method may be included as a few lines of code, wrapped as a function to be used repeatedly throughout a script, or mixed in with variables to minimize code duplication.

Strength: The amount of information provided to the user or admin is the biggest benefit of this cmdlet. It can create a progress bar to show a percentage of completion, even for multiple or nested cmdlets. Second is the ability to wrap this in a function for reference in future cmdlets or multiple times within the same script. It is especially useful for looped items, such as executing processes against multiple objects.

Weakness: The larger code base and flexibility make this a bit more complex to integrate with existing scripts. Depending on the aim of the author, this cmdlet may just be a bit of overkill for some instances. Nesting via IDs works well, but again the complexity could break existing script functionality if not tested thoroughly.

Usage

for ($i = 0; $i -le 100; $i++ ) { Write-Progress -Activity "Perform Specific Task" -Id 1 -Status "$i% Complete:" -PercentComplete $i; }

Also see

Sours: https://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-to-add-progress-indicators-to-powershell-scripts/

You will also be interested:

Display the progress of long-running tasks in PowerShell with Show-Progress instead of Write-Progress

The Show-Progress function provides a nice, compact way to display the progress of longer-running tasks in PowerShell. You can use it as a replacement for Write-Progress. While this has the advantage of being a "native" cmdlet with a few options to customize the progress of tasks, it occupies a bit of real estate in the PowerShell window (the upper portion of the console), sometimes hiding interesting information. The Show-Progress function is only a single line of text, at the current cursor position, and does not hide any output or status messages from other commands.

Emanuel Halapciuc

Emanuel is an IT consultant who has worked for 20 years in the industry. He is currently involved in a deployment project for the European Commission and focuses on Active Directory, Group Policy, Azure, and automation with PowerShell.

Latest posts by Emanuel Halapciuc (see all)

The progress is displayed as a progress bar along with the completion percentage for the currently running task. You can also provide a custom title for the task.

Prerequisites ^

The only prerequisite for the function is Windows PowerShell 5.1, which is the version shipped in any supported version of Windows. It also works with PowerShell 7. I did not test the function with older PowerShell versions.

Show-Progress can take advantage of other PowerShell modules loaded in the current session. For instance, if you have the PowerShell module for WSUS, you can display the WSUS server's progress downloading approved updates (an example of that is included in the next section).

Usage examples ^

You can use Get-Help to view the help for the function or use the switch -Examples to see some usage examples from the function's native help. Of course, the best way to test and understand Show-Progress is to put it to work. Let's look at a few usage scenarios.

Basic usage

Using Show-Progress without providing any parameters displays a simple progress bar for 100 seconds. While it looks nice, it is not particularly interesting.

Basic usage running in PowerShell 7

Basic usage running in PowerShell 7

Download progress in WSUS

Let's look at a more interesting scenario: showing a WSUS server's progress downloading approved updates from an upstream server. For better-looking code, we'll use splatting instead of a very long one-line command:

$WsusDownload = @{ 'PercentComplete' = ($WsusServer.GetContentDownloadProgress()).DownloadedBytes 'Total' = ($WsusServer.GetContentDownloadProgress()).TotalBytesToDownload 'Activity' = "Downloading WSUS Updates" 'Refresh' = 5 } Show-Progress @WsusDownload

This shows the download progress of the WSUS server. The progress bar and completion percentage are updated every 5 seconds.

WSUS downloads in progress

WSUS downloads in progress

Once completed, the progress bar looks like this, and the cursor becomes active again (unless this is part of a script and more commands follow):

WSUS downloads complete

WSUS downloads complete

Mass changes to a collection of users

Here, we update an entire OU of users (in this case, we change the description for our OU of Redirected Users) and use Show-Progress to display the overall progress.

$OU = "OU=RedirectedUsers,OU=Users,OU=Prod,DC=ha,DC=lab" $AllUsers = Get-ADUser -Filter * -SearchBase $OU $Complete = 0 foreach ($User in $AllUsers) { $User | Set-ADUser -Description "Moved from Vancouver" $Complete +=1 Show-Progress -PercentComplete $Complete -Total $AllUsers.count -Activity "Setting Description" -RefreshInterval 5 }
Mass editing users from an OU

Mass editing users from an OU

The Show-Progress function ^

The complete code for the function is below. To have it available every time, you can include it in your PowerShell profile script or in a module.

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function Show-Progress { <# .SYNOPSIS Displays the completion status for a running task. .DESCRIPTION Show-Progress displays the progress of a long-running activity, task, operation, etc. It is displayed as a progress bar, along with the completed percentage of the task. It displays on a single line (where the cursor is located). As opposed to Write-Progress, it doesn't hide the upper block of text in the PowerShell console. .PARAMETER Activity A label you can assign to the current task. Normally, you'd put a relevant description of what you're trying to accomplish (like "Restarting computers", or "Downloading Updates"). .PARAMETER PercentComplete Percentage to evaluate against the parameter total. It can be a number of members processed from a collection, a partial download, the current number of completed tasks, etc. .PARAMETER Total This is the number to evaluate against. It can be the number of users in a group, total number of bytes to download, total number of tasks to execute, etc. .PARAMETER RefreshInterval Amount of time between two 'refreshes' of the percentage complete and update of the progress bar. The default refresh interval is 1 second. .EXAMPLE Show-Progress Without any arguments, Show-Progress displays a progress bar for 100 seconds. If no value is provided for the Activity parameter, it will simply say "Current Task" and the completion percentage. .EXAMPLE Show-Progress -PercentComplete ($WsusServer.GetContentDownloadProgress()).DownloadedBytes -Total ($WsusServer.GetContentDownloadProgress()).TotalBytesToDownload -Activity "Downloading WSUS Updates" Displays a progress bar while WSUS downloads updates from an upstream source. .NOTES Author: Emanuel Halapciuc Last Updated: July 5th, 2021 #> Param( [Parameter()][string]$Activity="Current Task", [Parameter()][ValidateScript({$_ -gt 0})][long]$PercentComplete=1, [Parameter()][ValidateScript({$_ -gt 0})][long]$Total=100, [Parameter()][ValidateRange(1,60)][int]$RefreshInterval=1 ) Process { #Continue displaying progress on the same line/position $CurrentLine = $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition #Width of the progress bar if ($host.UI.RawUI.WindowSize.Width -gt 70) { $Width = 50 } else { $Width = ($host.UI.RawUI.WindowSize.Width) -20 } if ($Width -lt 20) {"Window size is too small to display the progress bar";break} $Percentage = ($PercentComplete / $Total) * 100 #Write-Host -ForegroundColor Magenta "Percentage: $Percentage" for ($i=0; $i -le 100; $i += $Percentage) { $Percentage = ($PercentComplete / $Total) * 100 $ProgressBar = 0 $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition = $CurrentLine Write-Host -NoNewline -ForegroundColor Cyan "[" while ($ProgressBar -le $i*$Width/100) { Write-Host -NoNewline "=" $ProgressBar++ } while (($ProgressBar -le $Width) -and ($ProgressBar -gt $i*$Width/100) ) { Write-Host -NoNewline " " $ProgressBar++ } #Write-Host -NoNewline $i Write-Host -NoNewline -ForegroundColor Cyan "] " Write-Host -NoNewline "$Activity`: " Write-Host -NoNewline "$([math]::round($i,2)) %, please wait" Start-Sleep -Seconds $RefreshInterval #Write-Host "" } #for # $host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition = $CurrentLine Write-Host -NoNewline -ForegroundColor Cyan "[" while ($end -le ($Width)) { Write-Host -NoNewline -ForegroundColor Green "=" $end += 1 } Write-Host -NoNewline -ForegroundColor Cyan "] " Write-Host -NoNewline "$Activity complete " #> } #Process } #function

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