Used mandola

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Gold Tone Mandola

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The Mandola, often used in Celtic traditional music, is to the mandolin what the viola is to the violin. The four double courses of strings are usually tuned in fifths to CGDA, a fifth lower than a mandolin, but many other tunings may be used. Our Mandola features authentic Celtic tone and low, comfortable playing action. The cast brass tailpiece is stronger and thicker than sheet metal tailpieces, providing more sustain. This traditionally shaped and finished mandola will complement the sound of any acoustic ensemble. Available as left-handed model.

  • Neck: Mahogany
  • Top: Solid Spruce
  • Back & Sides: Mahogany
  • Finish: Natural Gloss
  • Fingerboard: Select Wood
  • Bridge: Ebony with Bone Intonated
  • Tuners: Sealed Guitar-Style
  • Inlay: Snowflake
  • Truss Rod: Two-Way Adjustable
  • Binding: Wood
  • Buttons: Metal
  • Hardware: Nickel Plated
  • Tailpiece: Cast
  • Number of Frets: 20
  • Nut Width: 1-1/4″Bone
  • Scale Length: 17-1/16″
  • Weight: 3 lbs.
  • Tuning: CGDA
  • Strings: .050w, .035w, .020w, .016 (Doubled)
  • Option 1: L.R. B
  • Hard Case: Included
  • Left-Handed Available: Yes

 

All instruments are described to the best of our ability; for an in-hand description, please contact Picker's Supply at [email protected] call (800) 830-4669. We welcome all offers, trades, and barters for consideration.
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SKU: MANDOLACategories: Mandolin, New Instruments, OtherTags: celtic music, gold tone, irish music, mandola, mandolin

Description

Gold Tone Mandola

Sours: https://www.pickerssupply.com/?product=gold-tone-mandola

Octave mandolin

The octave mandolin is a fretted string instrument with four pairs of strings tuned in fifths, GDAE (low to high), an octave below a mandolin. It is larger than the mandola, but smaller than the mandocello and its construction is similar to other instruments in the mandolin family. Usually the courses are all unison pairs but the lower two may sometimes be strung as octave pairs with the higher-pitched octave string on top so that it is hit before the thicker lower-pitched string. Alternate tunings of GDAD and ADAD are often employed by Celtic musicians.

Terminology[edit]

The names of the mandolin family instruments vary between Europe and the United States.[1] The instruments that are known in the US as the mandola and the octave mandolin tend to be known in Great Britain and Ireland as the tenor mandola, the octave mandola (or the "Irish bouzouki"). Also, octave mandola is sometimes applied to what in the U.S. is a mandocello.

In Europe outside the British isles, mandola is the larger GDAE tuned instrument while the smaller CGDA tuned one is known as alt-mandoline (i.e., alto mandolin), mandoliola or liola.

This geographic distinction is not crisp, and there are cases of each term being used in each country. Jimmy Moon, a Scottish luthier,[2] calls his version of the instrument by both names; Paul Shippey, an English luthier,[3] uses the term "octave mandolin". Confusion will likely continue as the terms continue to be used interchangeably.

Construction[edit]

Mandolin body[edit]

Octave mandolin construction is similar to the mandolin: The body may be constructed with a bowl-shaped back according to designs of the 18th century Vinaccia school, or with a flat (arched) back according to the designs of Gibson Guitar Corporation, popularized in the United States in the early 20th century.

The scale length of the octave mandolin is longer than that of the mandolin, and varies more widely, from 19 inches (480 mm) to 24 inches (610 mm), with 21 inches (530 mm) being typical. The internal bracing is similar to the mandolin and mandola, with a single transverse brace on the top just below the oval sound hole. On modern instruments X-bracing is sometimes used.

As is typical of the mandolin family, octave mandolins can be found with either a single oval soundhole or a pair of "f " soundholes. As with the scale length, the number of frets on an octave mandolin also varies widely, from as few as 17 to as many as 24 frets: 18 or 19 frets is typical.

Guitar body[edit]

From the mid-20th century on, a number of makers have produced octave mandolins with guitar-shaped (e.g., the "hourglass" or "figure 8") bodies. These instruments are typically constructed essentially like acoustic guitars, with similar woods and internal bracing. The neck, however, is much narrower, and supports the mandolin string layout, rather than the traditional 6 strings of the guitar.

Layout of strings[edit]

As with the mandolin and mandola, the octave mandolin has four courses of two strings each. The two strings in each course are tuned in unison. Alternate tunings exist in which the strings in some courses are tuned to octaves, rather than unisons, but this is more typical of the Irish Bouzouki.

Tuning and range[edit]

Usually, courses of 2 adjacent strings are doubled (tuned to the same pitch). The standard octave mandolin tuning is G2G2D3D3A3A3E4E4, so the lowest open strings are tuned to the lowest G on the guitar, and the highest strings are tuned to the same E as the highest string of the guitar. This tuning is one octave below the mandolin (or a fourth below the mandola), and is equivalent to that of the tenor violin:

  • fourth (lowest tone) course: G2 (97.9989 Hz)
  • third course: D3 (146.832 Hz)
  • second course: A3 (220.000 Hz)
  • first (highest tone) course: E4 (329.628 Hz)

The average range, therefore, is about three-and-a-half octaves, with the exact range depending on the number of frets on the individual instrument: from about one and one-third octaves below middle C up to A
5 / B
5, in the octave above middle C, (with 18 frets), to as high as E6, with 24 frets.

Usage[edit]

Octave mandolins are sometimes used in mandolin orchestras in place of mandolas.[4] The mandolinists thus avoid learning to read music on the alto clef; music for the octave mandolin is usually written on the more familiar treble clef, and plays an octave lower than the notes shown (see octave clefs).

See also[edit]

See also: Lute § History and evolution of the lute, and Mandolin § History

Bibliography[edit]

  • Richards, Tobe A. (2006). The Octave Mandolin Chord Bible: GDAE Standard Tuning 2,160 Chords. United Kingdom: Cabot Books. ISBN .
  • McGann, John (2004). A Guide to Octave Mandolin and Bouzouki. USA/Worldwide: Mel Bay Publications.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Octave mandolin at Banjolin gives an explanation of why Europeans use the term "octave mandola".
  • John McGann on Octave Mandolin John McGann, author of Guide to Octave Mandolin and Bouzouki proposes standardized terminology, and discusses a variety of issues on playing the octave mandolin.
  • theMandolinTuner, a mandolin site focusing on mandolin tuning, chords and tabs
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octave_mandolin
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The shorter scale of the mandola appeals to many who love the ease, feel and appeal of a mandolin, but want more depth of tone. The string length is long enough to work for a rhythmic appoach, though the objective is melody and counterpoint playing. The pitch is lower than a mandolin and the fingering stretches aren't as tight.

The long scale mandola has a deeper tone and perhaps more preferable for celtic music. The traditional scale mandola is the typical and more widely used version, with the more percussive mandolin-familiar tight response. The carved-top creates the crisp and punctuated 'pop-py' sound common with mandolin family instruments with this feature.

I use a 10' radius induced- domed back that brings out the best possible projection and volume compared to carved backs. It also helps keep the instrument more affordable in terms of hardwood material usage and labour. I have made my own small handplane and scrapers to carve the contours of the top to achieve the correct specifications in tone and strength.

The long scale mandola model also evolved into the innovative 10 string short-scale cittern.

Every Nyberg Mandola incorporates solid body plates, a mahogany neck, ebony fingerboard and bridge, adjustable truss rod (through soundhole), chrome precision sealed tuning heads, chrome strap buttons, bone nut and saddle, custom cast and hinged bronze tailpiece, and includes a hardshell archtop case. Lifetime warranty.

Check the Design Ethics Page for details on construction, design, and options such as pick-ups.

 

Starting at $3550 US ($4250 CAD) 17" traditional.
$3350 US ($4200 CAD) Celtic long-scale 20"
These are base model prices which include a walnut or sapele body,choice of top, and binding. Hardshell case included.

cedarhonduran mahoganyrosewood
engelmann spruceflamed koaebony
sitka spruceflamed maplecocobolo
port orford cedarindian rosewoodbrazilian rosewood
alaska yellow cedarpaduak 
   

Click here to contact me for specific pricing based upon your desired options.

 

 

 

Sours: http://www.nyberginstruments.com/mando/mandola-carvedtop.html
Mandola vs mandolin

Trinity College TM-275B Mandola (Used)

 

Back and Side Material Solid Maple
Binding White ABS
Bridge Material Polished Indian Rosewood with Adjustment Wheels
Fingerboard Binding Ivoroid
Fingerboard Inlay M-O-P Snowflakes
Fingerboard Material Indian Rosewood
Finish Black Top with Natural High-gloss Back and Sides
Neck Material Mahogany
Number of Frets Clear 12
Number of Frets Total 22
Nut Material Bone
Nut Width 1 1/4"
Peghead Inlay Abalone and M-O-P Celtic Cross
Peghead Overlay Black ABS
Scale Length 17"
Top Solid Spruce
Truss Rod Traditional Two-Way Adjustable
Tuning Machines Deluxe Sealed Gear / Small Metal Buttons
Case Gig Bag

We Offer Free Shipping On All New Instruments Over $500

Look at this classy black top on this Trinity College Mandola! This is warm and deep in tone and features all solid construction. There are a few very light scuffs in the finish, but otherwise no dings or dents and plays beautifully. This comes with a nice gig bag.

Sours: https://www.denverfolklore.com/shop/Sold-Museum/p/Trinity-College-TM275B-Mandola-Used.htm

Mandola used

Used Eastman MDA815 Sunburst Mandola With Case

We have acquired another large batch of mint condition Eastman guitars and mandolins! These instruments are have barely been played, and are in nearly new condition. We hand picked every one of these, and they have all been inspected and set up.An inspired recreation of a unique specialty instrument from the Golden Age of mandolins. Solid Spruce Top, Solid Highly-flamed Maple back & sides with ebony fingerboard & adjustable ebony bridge. Warm & mellow tones with excellent sound projection.Body Dimensions: 29" X 11 1/2" X 2 1/8"Top Wood: Carved Solid SpruceBack/Sides Wood: Carved Solid Highly-flamed MapleBody Binding: Full Ivoroid BoxedNeck Woods: MapleNeck Length: 12 1/2"Nut Width/Material: 1 3/4", boneScale Length: 15-27/32"Fingerboard: 12" radiused ebonyFrets: 23 Jescar FW37053Inlays: AbaloneBridge: Fitted adjustable ebonyTailpiece: Stamped Chrome w/coverTuners: SchallerStrings: Custom DAddarioAvailable Finishes: SunburstFinish: High-gloss nitrocellulose lacquerCase: Fitted case included

Sours: https://www.southshoremusic.com/shop/Folk/Mandolin-Family/p/Used-Eastman-MDA815-Sunburst-Mandola-With-Case.htm
Irish Bouzouki, mandola, octave mandolin? Which is which?

Thread: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

  • Feb-25-2014, 10:58am#1

    Adam Sweet is offline
    Member

    Default I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola. It doesn't have to be anything fancy. I don't have much to spend at this time, so I'm looking for creative options.


  • Feb-25-2014, 11:06am#2

    Jim Garber is offline
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    I think the rules here are to post a free want ad in the classifieds.

    Jim

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  • Feb-25-2014, 2:02pm#3

    pheffernan is online now
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Adam SweetView Post

    I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola. It doesn't have to be anything fancy. I don't have much to spend at this time, so I'm looking for creative options.

    I'd look for a flattop like this Big Muddy http://store.dustystrings.com/p-2200...ddy-m-11m.aspx or this Flatiron http://www.musicgoround.com/p/116557...2mc-mandola-wc.

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  • Feb-26-2014, 7:59am#4

    Adam Sweet is offline
    Member

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    Thanks! Out of my price range unfortunately

  • Feb-26-2014, 9:26am#5

    DataNick is offline
    Loarcutus of MandoBorg DataNick's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    Adam,

    A helpful word of advice if I may...You should post a "Comparison" thread like "How does Mandola A compare to Mandola B", or "How Would you Rank Intermediate to Advanced Mandolas?" as a couple of examples in this General Discussion Forum; otherwise the moderators will shut down your threads asking you to post an "I would like" in the classifieds.

    Just tryin to save you some trouble...I personally don't know much about mandolas but wish you the best in your mandolin orchestra project!

    1994 Gibson F5L - Weber signed


    "Mandolin brands are a guide, not gospel! I don't drink koolaid and that Emperor is naked!"
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  • Feb-26-2014, 9:32am#6

    Jon Hall is offline
    Registered User Jon Hall's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    The Big Muddy for $600 is fair price but if you are looking for a mandola for less than $500 you will have to keep watching the classifieds here at the 'café. One of the older Mid Missouri mandolas might sell for less than 500 since the mandolins usually do.
    The only new mandolas, that I know of, in that price range are sold by Lark in the Morning http://larkinam.com/Mandolins.html
    but don't expect them to sound as good as a Big Muddy. You will pay for what you get.


  • Feb-26-2014, 9:42am#7

    pheffernan is online now
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Adam SweetView Post
    Thanks! Out of my price range unfortunately
    Respectfully, I think you'll be hard pressed to find a good sounding used mandola for significantly less.

    1924 Gibson A Snakehead
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    2015 Black A2-z
    2010 Black GBOM
    2017 Poe Scout
    2014 Smart F-Style Mandola
    2018 Vessel TM5
    2019 Hogan F5


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  • Feb-26-2014, 12:22pm#8

    nickster60 is offline
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    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    There are few mandolins in any shape that are really cheap and good. I thinks Big Muddy would be your best inexpensive option.

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  • Feb-26-2014, 1:51pm#9

    bratsche is offline
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    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    Adding another vote for Big Muddy. They (or their predecessor MidMissouri) can be found for much less than what a dealer charges for a used one, either on eBay or the Classifieds, but you may have to be patient.

    bratsche

    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

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  • Feb-26-2014, 1:59pm#10


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  • Feb-26-2014, 3:00pm#11

    allenhopkins is offline
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    Can you do $475 plus shipping?

    Later:I'm correctly informed that I've linked to an octave mandolin rather than a mandola. My bad.

    Cheapest new one I can find is $574. Or maybe $566.

    Instrument Alley offers one at $475, but there have been several Cafe´threads detailing issues with this seller.

    Last edited by allenhopkins; Feb-26-2014 at 3:25pm.

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  • Feb-26-2014, 3:05pm#12


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  • Feb-26-2014, 3:13pm#13

    Jim Garber is offline
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    There is also the Gold Tone Mandola but it is also $600.

    Jim

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  • Feb-26-2014, 3:34pm#14

    bratsche is offline
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    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    There's always the Hora, but it will certainly need nut/zero fret work to make it playable and a new bridge to make it play in tune. But it's an okay instrument and has pretty nice tone, if you're able to do those things for it.

    bratsche

    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

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  • Feb-26-2014, 3:41pm#15

    Martin Jonas is online now
    Registered User Martin Jonas's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    As you've asked for a creative suggestion, you could consider a waldzither. Their scale is right in the mandola range and they often have a great tone. When I need a CGDA mandola, I always use my waldzither.

    Martin

    http://www.youtube.com/user/mj10008


  • Feb-26-2014, 3:52pm#16

    catmandu2 is offline
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    As has been mentioned--depending on what you consider "good-sounding," what you seek may be quite rare. The MM/BM and TC are about the lowest-cost of the decent and readily available. The Horas are a different class--pretty harsh-sounding (string with flatwounds to reduce their bark : ) and hora-ible tuners

    I obtained a used Dean "mondo" (under $200) and converted it to a 9-string dola/OM--about equivalent to a TC

    As Martin suggested--if you can't afford a MM/BM or TC, look to convert or resurrect a vintage instrument


  • Feb-27-2014, 7:53am#17

    Adam Sweet is offline
    Member

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    Wow lots of great suggestions here, especially the idea of retuning a different instrument. Someone suggested I convert an old guitar in another thread. I have an octave mandolin which I've converted to a mando cello already. I wonder what would happen if I simply retune one of my mandolins to a low C? I haven't tried that yet. We do that in the violin world for kids all the time.


  • Feb-27-2014, 9:25am#18

    Jim Garber is offline
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    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    Adam: I emailed you about another possibility. I don't know if you got that msg.

    Retuning a mandolin down 4 steps might be a bit much. Of course, it would not do any harm to try. Unless you can use heavier strings. I would imagine that the strings would be way too loose.

    It sounds like you are going to need to do some fundraising for this new-born organization of yours. Perhaps a benefit concert to raise some cash would be an initial goal. You might approach some local businesses for sponsorships, offering free ads in the program.

    Jim

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  • Feb-27-2014, 5:37pm#19

    Dr H is offline
    Gadfly Dr H's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Adam SweetView Post

    I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola. It doesn't have to be anything fancy. I don't have much to spend at this time, so I'm looking for creative options.

    I think someone mentioned Hora, here, check this out:

    http://www.hora.ro/rg_2_mandola.html


    I've had one of these for four years, and I've been happy with it. Yes, I had to fiddle with the bridge a bit (made a new one, actually, to raise the action a little), but other than that, you're not going to see much else in mandolas for that price. Keep in mind, that the price given is in Euros, so the number of US Dollars is going to be about 40% more.

    Is it a good sounding mandola? Well, let me put it this way: if it's the only mandola you have, then it will be the best-sounding mandola you own.

    ETA: BTW, that price is for a new instrument. Mayhap you can find a used one on eBay for less.

    Dr H
    -----
    "I have nothing to say, and I am saying it, and that is poetry." -- John Cage


  • Feb-27-2014, 6:00pm#20

    bertran is offline
    Registered User

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    I was in a similar position and budget last year, and based on member comments in this thread:

    http://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/sh...-ebay-mandolas

    decided to go for a new mandola from the shop of Portuguese luthier Antonio Caravalho. I found one online from Kieran Maloney, and I see that he's offering one now at around $400 in the café classifieds:

    http://www.mandolincafe.com/ads/73757

    I'm quite content with mine; it's no question a bona fide musical instrument, and a pleasure to play. The scale length (18.5") is such that it can be strung CGDA or GDAE.


  • Feb-27-2014, 9:21pm#21

    bratsche is offline
    MandolaViola bratsche's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Dr HView Post

    I think someone mentioned Hora, here, check this out:

    http://www.hora.ro/rg_2_mandola.html

    I've had one of these for four years, and I've been happy with it. Yes, I had to fiddle with the bridge a bit (made a new one, actually, to raise the action a little), but other than that, you're not going to see much else in mandolas for that price. Keep in mind, that the price given is in Euros, so the number of US Dollars is going to be about 40% more.

    I was the one who posted a link to eBay Horas for $185. I had the plain-jane Troubadour version of it (no dark stain or adornments) for a few years, and sold it only because I have so many others that I like significantly more (that were all in the -/+$500 range, as well - so I guess I've been "extraordinarily lucky"). I had to make a new compensated bridge for mine, too, but I had to lower the action, not raise it..

    Is it a good soundingmandola? Well, let me put it this way: if it's the onlymandola you have, then it will be the best-sounding mandola you own.
    Actually, I didn't think mine sounded half bad after I had tinkered with it. The low register was nice because of the deep body cavity. A whole lot nicer than a mandolin strung up (or, rather, down) as a mandola would sound, IMO.

    bratsche

    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

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  • Feb-28-2014, 9:26am#22

    Adam Sweet is offline
    Member

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Jim GarberView Post

    Adam: I emailed you about another possibility. I don't know if you got that msg.

    It sounds like you are going to need to do some fundraising for this new-born organization of yours. Perhaps a benefit concert to raise some cash would be an initial goal. You might approach some local businesses for sponsorships, offering free ads in the program.

    I did get it. Thank you!

    Yes, we will need some funds. We are applying for several grants. There isn't any support from the local businesses for the orchestra other than casual - of course they all hope our mandolinists go to their shops to buy things and get stuff repaired there...so they have been luke-warm towards the orchestra from that perspective. But there really aren't any good mandolin shops in my area anyway. Sure the Fretted Instrument Workshop (Amherst) carries a few, as does the Luthier's Coop (Easthampton) and Downtown Sounds (Northampton), but FIW is a guitar/banjo shop, LC is an open mic coffee house that has a few instruments for sale and Downtown Sounds is a rock shop. Generally I send my students to the Music Emporium in Arlington as they have the best selection of mandolins in stock. I would be happy/glad/joyful to send my students to these local businesses if they were a little more friendly about collaborating.

    Yeah it's not going to be easy to get local support. That's why this is a long term project.

  • Mar-03-2014, 2:29pm#23

    Dr H is offline
    Gadfly Dr H's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bratscheView Post

    Actually, I didn't think mine sounded half bad after I had tinkered with it. The low register was nice because of the deep body cavity. A whole lot nicer than a mandolin strung up (or, rather, down) as a mandola would sound, IMO.

    bratsche

    I like the sound of mine. I wanted to put slightly heavier strings on it than what came with, and that necesitated raising the action a tad.

    I wish Hora would make a mandocello. If it were priced proportionately to their other mandolins, it would be a neat way to try out the instrument without having to take out a second mortgage.

    Dr H
    -----
    "I have nothing to say, and I am saying it, and that is poetry." -- John Cage


  • Mar-03-2014, 3:31pm#24

    bratsche is offline
    MandolaViola bratsche's Avatar

    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    I wouldn't trust a Hora mandocello (if they made one). Heck, I wouldn't trust their OM, after things I've read about their non-reinforced necks bowing. Some even reported that with the mandola, but mine stayed straight.

    As far as an affordable mandocello, I think I saw one on the site that sold the Antonio Caravalho mandola, by the same maker as well. I don't know a thing about it, though. And of course it's a little pricier than the Hora instruments, but still reasonable.

    bratsche

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  • Mar-03-2014, 3:52pm#25

    catmandu2 is offline
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    Default Re: I'm looking for a good sounding used Mandola

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bratscheView Post

    I wouldn't trust a Hora mandocello (if they made one). Heck, I wouldn't trust their OM, after things I've read about their non-reinforced necks bowing. Some even reported that with the mandola, but mine stayed straight.

    Indeed--they are very lightly built. My Hora bouzouki's neck was highly susceptible to string gauge (affecting its relief)--gather up a bunch of extra bridges in varying heights to compensate . David Lindley obviously finds them serviceable--a nifty little thing you can play with and modify without worry, such as refret to any scale you like a la David's (although he obviously doesn't rely on their acoustic tone quality)--he probably travels with a quiver of them; slap a pickup on them and, as David says, "git you an amp"


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