Boston university required courses

Boston university required courses DEFAULT

ENG Undergraduate Degree Requirements

All undergraduate engineering students are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits of coursework in mathematics and natural sciences. The specific requirements in each of these subject areas are described below:

Mathematics

The following four courses in college calculus are required:
CAS MA 123 | Calculus I
CAS MA 124 | Calculus II
CAS MA 225 | Multivariate Calculus
CAS MA 226 | Differential Equations
Students in their first semester of study typically enroll in CAS MA 123, Calculus I, unless they have advanced credit or transfer credit in calculus.

Students with Calculus I advanced credit or transfer credit are encouraged to use it to satisfy the CAS MA 123 requirement. Such students enroll in CAS MA 124, then CAS MA 225, followed by CAS MA 226.
Students with Calculus I & II advanced credit or transfer credit are encouraged to use it to satisfy the CAS MA 123 & CAS MA 124 requirement. These students enroll in CAS MA 225, followed by CAS MA 226.

Students who have previous experience in calculus, but do not receive advanced credit or transfer credit, are advised to first enroll in CAS MA 123. In exceptional circumstances, and with approval of their faculty advisor, such students may instead begin in CAS MA 124. These students must take a four-credit technical course to satisfy the credit deficiency they will incur by skipping MA 123.

Honors-level courses in Calculus and Differential Equations (CAS MA 230, CAS MA 231) are acceptable substitutions for CAS MA 225 and CAS MA 226, respectively.

Natural Sciences

All undergraduate engineering students are required to take a minimum of three natural science courses:
CAS CH 101 or 131 | Introductory Chemistry
CAS PY 211 | Physics I
CAS PY 212 | Physics II
Students in some majors are required to take additional natural science courses; see specific curricula for each program. Please note: students who have not declared their major but are at all considering biomedical engineering as a major should enroll in CAS CH 101 instead of CAS CH 131.

Students who wish to obtain a more in-depth foundation in chemistry may enroll in one of the following 2-course sequences in place of the CAS CH 101 & CAS CH 102 sequence:
1. CAS CH 109 & CAS CH 110
2. CAS CH 111 & CAS CH 112

Students who wish to obtain a more in-depth foundation in physics may enroll in the following 2-course sequence in place of CAS PY 211 & CAS PY 212:
1. CAS PY 251 & CAS PY 252

Students who wish to obtain a more in-depth knowledge of physics may enroll in either of the following courses in place of CAS PY 313:
1. CAS PY 351 & CAS PY 352

Sours: https://www.bu.edu/eng/current-students/ugrad/requirements/

Academic Requirements

Figuring out what “counts”

Like all Boston University undergraduates, you will have university-level requirements, college-level requirements (sometimes these are the same as university-level requirements), general education requirements (the BU Hub Transfer Student Curriculum), and major requirements.

University-level requirements

All undergraduates must earn at least 128 credits in order to graduate.

At least 48 credits must be earned in residence at Boston University, and you can transfer in a maximum of 80 credits.

A maximum of 16 credits of “D” grades earned at Boston University can be applied toward the credits you need for your degree. (Courses in which you earn a “D” may not count toward your major or minor. Check the Bulletin for your program(s) to see the grades needed for courses to count in your major or minor. Many majors and minors have higher grade requirements (ex. B- or higher) for courses to count toward the program.)

College-level requirements

Some of BU’s undergraduate schools and colleges have college-specific requirements. For example, the College of Arts and Sciences has a Second Language Requirement.

Check the Bulletin of your school or college to see if you have college requirements in addition to your general education requirements and major requirements.

General Education (BU Hub) requirements

All students who transfer into BU in Fall 2020 or later are required to complete the BU Hub Transfer Student Curriculum. (Students who transferred into the university before Fall 2020 are subject to the general education requirements for their cohort in their school or college.) The Hub Transfer Student Curriculum requires you to earn 10 Hub units.

Hub units must be earned at Boston University or through receiving a high enough score on an Advanced Credit Exam (ex. an AP exam). Only some advanced credit exams carry Hub units. See BU’s Advanced Credit Guides to learn which exams count toward the Hub.

Major requirements

Your major requirements can be found in the Bulletin, and they will appear on your Degree Advice report.

Some of the courses you transferred in from your previous institution(s) may count toward your major, while others may earn you credit toward the total credits required for your degree, but not toward your major. Courses that count toward degree credits, but not for your major, minor, or the Hub, will appear under “Extra Courses” on your Degree Advice report.

While you cannot petition for external courses to count toward your Hub requirements, sometimes you can petition for an external course to count toward your degree or major requirements. Talk with your academic advisor or visit your school’s advising or student services office to learn more about the petition process.

“It can be easy to feel lonely in such a vast school, but through the help of my advisor I have truly found my place at BU. He made a point of introducing me to other students, who have also helped me through the transition into the physics program. Through them, I feel as if I belong to a community of intelligent students, who push me to learn at a faster rate than I ever have in the past.”

– Kevin Reiss, CAS’22
Sours: https://www.bu.edu/advising/transfer-students/academic-requirements/
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Undergraduate Curricula

The curriculum of each undergraduate degree program offered by the College of Engineering consists of two components: Hub requirements (for students who matriculated in fall 2018 or after, and transfer students who matriculated in fall 2020 and after); and program requirements.

Program requirements include freshman- and sophomore-year courses designed to provide a common academic experience and foundation for all engineering undergraduates, as well as degree-specific courses and electives taken in the junior and senior years. Engineering students should refer to College of Engineering program planning sheets for the specific curricular requirements of their program of study. Most of the required Hub units are integrated into the program requirements. Remaining BU Hub requirements will usually be satisfied by writing seminars and Hub electives selected from a wide range of courses or, in some cases, cocurricular experiences (see below).

The engineering degree programs evolve from a common set of mathematics, natural sciences, and core engineering courses, which provide students with the rigorous foundation needed for more specialized engineering coursework in the major area of study. All of the programs of study provide students with the engineering science, design, and laboratory background required to enter industry as fully productive engineers in their chosen fields. The engineering programs also provide a foundation for graduate study in engineering and other fields.

The BS programs in biomedical engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.abet.org).

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of any of the engineering BS programs will have:

  1. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Mathematics and Natural Sciences Requirements

All undergraduate engineering students are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits of coursework in mathematics and natural sciences. The specific requirements in each of these subject areas are described below:

Mathematics

The following four courses in college calculus are required:

  • CAS MA 123 Calculus I
  • CAS MA 124 Calculus II
  • CAS MA 225 Multivariate Calculus
  • CAS MA 226 Differential Equations

Students in their first semester of study typically enroll in CAS MA 123 Calculus I, unless they have Advanced Placement examination credit or transfer credit in calculus. Students with Advanced Placement examination credit or transfer credit for Calculus I are encouraged to use it to satisfy the CAS MA 123 requirement. Such students typically enroll in CAS MA 124, then CAS MA 225, followed by CAS MA 226. Students with Advanced Placement examination credit or transfer credit for Calculus I and II are encouraged to use it to satisfy the CAS MA 123 and CAS MA 124 requirements. These students enroll in CAS MA 225, followed by CAS MA 226. All students must complete CAS MA 225 and CAS MA 226.

Students who have previous experience in calculus, but do not receive Advanced Placement credit or transfer credit, are advised to first enroll in CAS MA 123. In exceptional circumstances, and with the approval of their faculty advisor, such students may instead begin in CAS MA 124. These students must take a 4-credit technical course to satisfy the credit deficiency they will incur by skipping CAS MA 123.

Honors-level courses in calculus and differential equations (CAS MA 230, CAS MA 231) are acceptable substitutions for CAS MA 225 and CAS MA 226, respectively.

Natural Sciences

Every engineering student is required to take a minimum of three natural science courses: an introductory chemistry course, CAS CH 131, and two physics courses, CAS PY 211 and CAS PY 212. Students in Biomedical Engineering are required to take the two-semester sequence of CAS CH 101 and CAS CH 102 instead of CAS CH 131. Some majors are required to take additional natural science courses. See specific curricula for each program. Students who are undecided but are considering Biomedical Engineering as a major should take CAS CH 101 instead of CAS CH 131.

Students who wish to have a more in-depth foundation in chemistry may substitute one of the following 2-course sequences in place of the CH 101/CH 102 sequence:

  • CAS CH 109 & CAS CH 110
  • CAS CH 111 & CAS CH 112

Students who wish to obtain a more in-depth foundation in physics may enroll in the following 2-course sequence in place of CAS PY 211 & CAS PY 212:

  • CAS PY 251 & CAS PY 252

Engineering Core Requirements

The engineering core courses required in all engineering programs cover basic engineering sciences:

  • ENG EK 103 Computational Linear Algebra (3 cr)
  • ENG EK 125 Introduction to Programming for Engineers (4 cr)
  • ENG EK 131 Introduction to Engineering (2 cr)
  • ENG EK 210 Introduction to Engineering Design (2 cr)
  • ENG EK 301 Engineering Mechanics I (4 cr)
  • ENG EK 307 Electric Circuits (4 cr)
  • ENG EK 381 Probability, Statistics, and Data Science for Engineers (4 cr)

These courses are required for all engineering majors and are usually taken in the freshman and sophomore years. Students in some programs may take EK 381 in the junior year.

General Education Requirement—students who matriculated in fall 2018 or later, and transfer students who matriculated in fall 2020 or later

Students who matriculated in fall 2018 or later, and transfer students who matriculated in fall 2020 or later, satisfy general education requirements through the BU Hub, a general education program that is integrated into the entire undergraduate experience. BU Hub requirements are flexible and can be satisfied in many different ways, through coursework in and beyond the major and, in some cases, through cocurricular activities. Students majoring in the College of Engineering ordinarily satisfy 18 of the 26 BU Hub requirements through required coursework in the major. Remaining BU Hub requirements must be satisfied by selecting from a wide range of writing seminars and available courses outside the major or, in some cases, cocurricular experiences.

General Education Requirement—students who matriculated prior to fall 2018, and transfer students who matriculated prior to fall 2020

The College of Engineering general education requirement is intended to enhance the ability of engineering students to communicate effectively and to better understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and/or societal context. Students are required to complete a minimum of 24 credits of general education courses: a writing sequence (at least two courses); distribution in humanities and social sciences (at least three courses); and a general education elective (at least one course). A minimum of 4 quarter hours or 2.50 semester hours of credit constitutes a course. The general education requirements are as follows:

Writing Sequence8 credits
Social Sciences and Humanities Distribution12 credits
General Education Elective4 credits
Total24 credits

Writing Sequence

Students are required to satisfy the writing requirement by successfully completing CAS WR 100 or 120 and CAS WR 150, 151, or 152, or the equivalent.

Social Sciences and Humanities Distribution

The social sciences are the study of individual relationships in and with society. Students must take at least one course in the social sciences. Courses that fulfill this requirement are chosen from an approved list.

The humanities are the branches of knowledge concerned with individuals and their culture. Students must take at least one course in the humanities. Courses that fulfill this requirement must be chosen from an approved list.

General Education Elective

The general education elective allows students to be exposed to fields of study beyond the social sciences and humanities in order to further broaden their education. This 4-credit elective can be satisfied by appropriate combinations of 1- to 4-credit courses that include additional writing, social sciences, humanities, fine arts, and others. Please see the list of courses that can be used to satisfy the general education elective.

CAS Core Curriculum

The CAS Core Curriculum is an alternative path to completing the general education requirements. Students who wish to complete their general education requirements with the Core Curriculum or some combination of the Core Curriculum courses should contact the Undergraduate Programs office for more information.

Sours: https://www.bu.edu/academics/eng/programs/undergraduate-curricula/
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Bachelor of Arts Degree Overview

All students in College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) undergraduate degree programs are subject to the generalBoston University policies and regulations governing undergraduatesstated in the Bulletin. In addition, CAS students are subject to the specificpolicies and regulations governing CAS degree programs. All CAS students are responsible for understanding these policies and acting in accordance with them. Further information and assistance is available inCAS Academic Advisingat 100 Bay State Road, on the fourth floor.

College Program for the Liberal Arts & Sciences

Students in the College of Arts & Sciences earn the degree Bachelor of Arts (BA). The CAS College Program for the Liberal Arts & Sciences is designed to ensure that all students acquire the broad and deep base of skills, competence, and knowledge that is the mark of a liberally educated person and that prepares them for a successful and creative life. It provides ample opportunity for students to design their degree program in a manner that suits their particular interests, abilities, and aspirations. The degree requirements listed below reflect specific essential principles and goals of the CAS College Program.

Degree Requirements

The CAS College Program requires a minimum of 128 credits, excluding PDP, ROTC, and CAS FY and SY courses.

BU Hub General Education Requirement

CAS students must complete all general education requirements in theBU Hub.

Second Language Requirement

A liberally educated person can communicate effectively in a global world. To this end, students are required to pursuestudy of a language other than Englishthrough the intermediate (fourth-semester) level or to demonstrate equivalent proficiency.

Major Requirement

A liberally educated person possesses in-depth understanding and skills in a particular area of study. To this end, students are required to complete either anexisting CAS major, usually consisting of 9 to 16 courses, or anindependent major.

Additional Requirements for Graduation from CAS

Minimum Grade Requirement

A grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in academic coursework is required for graduation. Students may offer for the degree no more than four courses (16 credits) with a grade of D. Courses taken to satisfy major and minor requirements must receive a grade of at least C.

Seven-Year Rule

The BA program must be completed within seven years after a student first matriculates, either at Boston University or at another institution.

Residency Requirement

All Boston University students must complete a minimum of 48 Boston University credits for the undergraduate program. More than that minimum may be required for completion of a student’s chosen program of study. For CAS students, courses used to satisfy specific major requirements must be completed within CAS, within another Boston University school or college if allowed by the relevant major, or at another accredited college or university and approved by the relevant CAS department or program. Further, CAS students must complete at least four principal courses for the major in CAS; some departments or programs may require more. “Boston University credits” include those earned in Boston University summer courses and Boston University study abroad programs.

The student is also advised to reviewAcademic Progress and Graduation.

Additional Options

Minors

CAS students are not required to have a minor field of study. But they may choose to take advantage of the many optionalminors(usually 5–6 courses providing a systematic introduction to a discipline or interdisciplinary field) that are offered both within CAS and across Boston University’s undergraduate professional schools and colleges.

Core Curriculum

TheCore Curriculumis an integrated curriculum in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences that provides a strong intellectual foundation for any undergraduate major or professional pursuit, as well as a guided pathway through theBU Hub. Interested students should consult the Core Curriculum orCAS Academic Advisingfor information.

Directed Study

Directed study allows the advanced undergraduate student to pursue independent research under the guidance of a faculty specialist. Ordinarily, directed study proposals are developed in consultation with a faculty advisor and are submitted for approval no later than the week preceding registration. Directed study projects may be undertaken for variable credit (1–6 credits) and students may complete a maximum of 12 credits of directed study while at CAS. Further information and applications are available at theCAS Academic Advising website.

Honors in the Major

Qualified CAS students may apply to pursue a course of study leading to graduation with honors in their chosen major. More information can be found in theHonors in the Majorportion of this Bulletin.

Study Abroad

Study abroadin academic and combined academic/internship programs is strongly encouraged for students in all CAS majors.

Other Opportunities

Other special opportunities that applicants to CAS and continuing students may wish to consider include the following:

Planning a Degree Program in CAS

Informed decisionmaking is key to completing degree requirements in a timely way and taking best advantage of the academic opportunities available to CAS students. In working with academic advisors to design their degree programs, students should take particular note of the following:

First-Year Course Selection

First-year students normally are guided in the selection of courses in their first semester by a special registration and orientation process that takes place over the summer. First-year students who offer advanced placement or other special qualifications may register for more advanced courses with the permission of the appropriate departments.

All students are generally advised to begin work toward completion of theSecond Language Requirementand theirBU Hub requirementsas soon as possible.

Advanced Placement and Credit

Students entering Boston University who offer satisfactory scores in advanced placement examinations or selected international universities may receive advanced placement and credit within CAS and the BU Hub. Please refer to Boston University’s Admissionswebsitefor further information.

No advanced standing is granted to students in the Seven-Year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program. However, advanced placement exam results may be used to meet nonscience departmental requirements if approved by the department.

For specific information about advanced placement or credit by examination, see theAdvanced Credit Guidefrom BU Admissions.

Course Credits

Most CAS courses carry 4 credits; a few carry half or variable credit. Many CAS students achieve the total of 128 credits required for graduation by taking 32 distinct (4-credit) courses. A 3-credit course taken in another college at Boston University or elsewhere, or a 5-credit course taken in the quarter-hour system, is not equivalent to a 4-credit semester course in the College of Arts & Sciences.

Course Load

Students are expected to be enrolled on a full-time basis. Students ordinarily are expected to proceed at the rate of four (4-credit) courses per semester. To be considered a full-time degree candidate, a student must be registered in a minimum of three 4-credit courses (12 credits).

Students wishing to register for 19 or 20 credits, but not more than 20, may do so without prior CAS approval if they are in good academic standing and their advisor approves; however, first-semester freshmen and first-semester transfers may not take five 4-credit courses. Additional tuition will be charged for all credits in excess of 18, except to students with a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher, or students in their senior year who have accumulated at least 88 credits. Additional tuition will be charged to all students for credits in excess of 20. Courseoverload fee waiver forms should be submitted to CAS Academic Advising.

Intra-University Transfer

Students in other schools and colleges within the University wishing to transfer into the College of Arts & Sciences mayobtain informationat CAS Academic Advising. CAS students wishing to transfer to another school or college within the University must consult that particular school or college.

Visiting Students

A CAS student wishing to spend a semester at another institution as an unmatriculated student should first inquire atCAS Academic Advisingfor information on the appropriate procedure. A student from another college or university wishing to spend a semester or two as an unmatriculated student in CAS shouldcontact the Admissions officefor guidelines and applications.

Sours: https://www.bu.edu/academics/cas/programs/degree-overview/

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UndergraduateInformation

Providing our students with the critical skills and knowledge to be successful while at BU and beyond.

The CAS College Program is based on the principles of a liberal education, and on our dedication to the goal that all CAS undergraduates should receive a rigorous and engaging education that will serve them for the rest of their lives.

The College Program is a common framework of elements that drive the basic requirements for every BA earned in the College of Arts & Sciences: critical skills and competencies graduates will need to continue to learn, create, and flourish; a breadth of knowledge and understanding provided by the general education requirement; and a depth of knowledge and expertise gained through completing a major. The College Program is also dedicated to exploration and discovery as a fundamental part of the undergraduate experience. Flexibility is built into all courses of study to encourage students to delve into any of the many fascinating fields of learning available in CAS or other colleges or to take advantage of some of the special academic opportunities we offer.

For more information about completing the College Program, see Degree Requirements.

Students matriculating as freshmen prior to 2018 and all transfer students should refer to theBulletin Archivefor CAS College Program requirements.

Second Language Requirement

CAS requires all students to demonstrate or develop proficiency at or above the intermediate level in a language other than English.

Proficiency in a second language provides insight into other cultures, enables direct contact with literature and other written and oral texts, and combined with other fields of study, serves a multitude of practical and professional purposes. It sharpens skills in one’s first language, and it develops critical thinking and understanding needed for life in multicultural and multilingual societies in the US and elsewhere.

For more information on foreign language studies at CAS, visit the Language Learning webpage and the BU Bulletin.

The BU Hub

CAS requires all students to complete the BU Hub requirement, Boston University’s general education program, which establishes a common educational experience for all BU undergraduates. It offers them the opportunity to develop the knowledge, skills, and habits of mind that will enable them to be lifelong learners and leaders in a rapidly evolving, interconnected, and globalized world.

The Hub fosters intellectual exploration by encouraging students to take courses in schools and colleges across the University. Hub courses can fulfill both Hub and major requirements, and are interwoven throughout a student’s undergraduate education.

Majors and Minors

Majors

The role of majors in the curriculum is to ensure that all graduates have experienced the challenges and rewards of studying an academic discipline or interdisciplinary subject in consider­able depth. With the help of an advisor, each student chooses and completes one major of between 9 and 18 courses. Some students elect to double-major, or to supplement their major with a minor in a sec­ond field of strong personal interest.

Most students select their major from a comprehensive list of existing departmental and interdisciplinary majors. In certain cases, students may instead complete an independent major planned in consultation with an advisor.

Minors

Because engaging in wide-ranging academic exploration is fundamental to the undergraduate experience at the College of Arts & Sciences, space is preserved in every student’s course of study for several free electives such as minors.

Although minors are not required, they are available to students who wish to study an area other than their major. Each minor consists of a coherent sequence of five to eight courses in a single department or interdisciplinary field.

Sours: https://www.bu.edu/cas/academics/undergraduate-education/the-college-program/
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Courses

The listing of a course description here does not guarantee a course’s being offered in a particular semester. Please refer to the published schedule of classes on the Student Link for confirmation a class is actually being taught and for specific course meeting dates and times.

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    • African American Studies
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  • CAS AA 100: Topics in African American Studies
    May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
  • CAS AA 103: Introduction to African American Literature
    What is the African American literary tradition? How does it change over time? This course is to introduce you to the cultural, political, and historical contexts of the African American experience through readings of literature. We will read poetry, slave narratives, essays and speeches, tales, short stories, and novels, and as we examine these texts, we will consider how culture, politics, and history shape African American literature. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
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    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS AA 112: Black Power in the Classroom: The History of Black Studies
    Centers Black experiences, cultures, knowledge production and identity formation in the United States and in the African Diaspora across time and space. Examines and traces the genealogies of Black Studies as a discipline: its political, ideological, and practical foundations on college campuses and in communities. Also explores earlier traditions and contemporary work in Black radical thought and activism that lay the groundwork for and build on the founding principles of Black Studies by mobilizing an intersectional and diasporic lens. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I, Research and Information Literacy.
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    • Historical Consciousness
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • CAS AA 113: Introduction to Antiracism
    This course introduces students to the concept of antiracism, particularly its historical contours in the United States. Effective Fall 2021, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.
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    • Historical Consciousness
    • The Individual in Community
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  • CAS AA 132: Write Back Soon: Blackness and the Prison
    This course interrogates the theme of black containment from slavery and Jim Crow to, principally, mass incarceration. The topic is explored in tandem with the development of open letter writing skills. This epistolary form allows both for the intimate engagement of individual, familiar contact and the deft inclusion of targeted eavesdroppers in order to raise the consciousness of listeners and affirm the value of personal relationships. Course texts include letters to and from prison, poetry, short stories, memoir, social science, documentaries, and critical theory. Effective Fall 2021, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Aesthetic Exploration, Critical Thinking.
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    • Aesthetic Exploration
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  • CAS AA 200: Topics in African American Studies
    May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Topic for Fall 2021: African American Literature and the Classical Tradition. Traces the history of adaptions and allusions to antiquity in Black writers from the eighteenth century to today, in a wide range of genres: poetry, essays, travel writing, novels, drama, and film.
  • CAS AA 207: Sociology of Race and Ethnicity
    This course examines the fundamental theoretical and empirical approaches regarding race/ethnicity and the current state of race relations in the U.S. that explore both contemporary social problems and the deep historical roots of those problems through a sociological lens. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Also offered as CAS SO 207. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, The Individual in Community, Research and Information Literacy.
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    • Historical Consciousness
    • The Individual in Community
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  • CAS AA 210: American Minstrelsy
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120)
    An American entertainment historically rooted in commodified performance of "blackness", this course engages with the complicated history of minstrelsy as both a racist and progressive art form. Course material surveys the minstrel tradition and its influence on popular entertainment. Effective Spring 2022, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing-Intensive Course, Aesthetic Exploration, Research and Information Literacy.
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  • CAS AA 215: Arts of Africa and Its Diaspora
    Exploration of a diversity of visual and performing arts from Africa, including royal regalia, masquerades, and contemporary painting. Examines how the dispersal of Africans, due to the transatlantic slave trade and immigration, contributed to the cultural richness of the Americas. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
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    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS AA 234: African Americans in Global Perspective: Slavery and the Creation of Race
    A study of how chattel slavery in the Americas led to racialization as a primary tool in the creation of American society and New World capitalism. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Ethical Reasoning, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
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    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Ethical Reasoning
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS AA 296: Religion and Hip Hop
    Uses digital media studies to explore diverse religious expressions in hip hop culture. Through critical reading, community field trips, and hands-on technology usage, students consider an often overlooked element in the study of hip hop culture: religion. Effective Fall 2020, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, Aesthetic Exploration, Creativity/Innovation.
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    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Digital/Multimedia Expression
    • Creativity/Innovation
  • CAS AA 300: Topics in African American Studies
    May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Topic for Fall 2021: Latinx Identities, Families and Communities. Through literature, journalism, and film, this course explores the various races and ethnicities that comprise Latinx identities in the US. Topics include immigration, multiculturalism, colorism, family expectations, the college experience, mental health, gentrification, and the media representation of Latinx peoples.
  • CAS AA 303: African Americans and the Humanities
    Examines political, cultural, and historical roots of the African American experience through readings in African American literature. Topic for Spring 2021: African Americans in Popular Culture: Commodifying the Black Image. Explores the history of black people's images in American popular culture. Attention to how blacks have represented themselves and how those representations reflect historical periods as well as specific political and cultural events.
  • CAS AA 304: Introduction to African American Women Writers
    This course studies the cultural contexts and the ongoing relevance of significant works by African American Women Writers. Works by Jacobs, Butler, Harper, Hurston, Brooks, Kincaid, Morrison and Marshall complemented by critical articles lay out this rich tradition. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
    BU HubLearn More
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS AA 305: Toni Morrison's American Times
    Using historical and literary sources to make visible the interactions between the world of the novel and that of American history, the course examines how Morrison's Song of Solomon, Beloved, Jazz, and Love depict crucial times in American history. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
    BU HubLearn More
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Critical Thinking
  • CAS AA 306: Experiencing Cuba: History, Culture, and Politics
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor; prior academic study of Cuba, Latin America, or the Caribbean recommended.
    Expeditionary course, team taught by BU and local faculty in Havana, Cuba. Firsthand study of the island's history, culture, and politics, toward understanding of the local, international, and transnational processes that shaped and continue to shape this unique society. Also offered as CAS HI 395 E and CAS IR 246 E.
  • CAS AA 308: Race and Politics
    Combining research from history, political science, sociology, and economics, this course examines the role of race and ethnicity in shaping American politics and policy. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.
  • CAS AA 309: African American History in Global and Comparative Perspective
    In-depth study of selected topics in African American history from the seventeenth century to the present. Topic for Fall 2019: Slavery and the Making of Race. Study of the processes of racialization in the making of the New-World. Asks how do contemporary constructions of race, from social tensions to political movements draw on histories of the past?
  • CAS AA 310: Civil Rights History
    This course examines the U.S. Civil Rights and the struggle for black freedom movements. From the late nineteenth century through the twenty-first century, we consider events, organizations, "leaders" and organizers, legal campaigns, and political protests to answer the questions: What were the race, class, and gender dynamics within the movements? What were the changing definitions of freedom? The course treats the movement's roots, goals, ideologies, and cultures, and includes a comparison of the struggles for equal rights of Mexican Americans, Native Americans, LGBT folks, and other groups. Effective Spring 2021, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Historical Consciousness, Teamwork/Collaboration.
    BU HubLearn More
    • Historical Consciousness
    • The Individual in Community
    • Teamwork/Collaboration
  • CAS AA 311: African American Religious History
    This course offers a historical survey of religions practiced by people of African descent living in North America. Students explore the diverse terrain of African American religiosity, which includes Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Spiritualism, and African-derived religions.
Sours: https://www.bu.edu/academics/cas/courses/

Now discussing:

Core Curriculum

The Core Curriculum is an integrated sequence of liberal arts courses in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences that builds a strong intellectual foundation for any undergraduate major.

Centered around weekly lectures and small discussion classes with faculty representing many disciplines and departments at BU, Core invites students to engage with enduring texts, art, and narratives. Core’s pathways through the Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences courses are designed to address questions common to all disciplines and foster intellectual growth. Students will receive Hub units in every Core class, and if you choose to complete all of Core’s foundational courses, one of our digital and multimedia classes, and a cocurricular, you will satisfy all Hub requirements.

Core’s eight foundational classes are designed to work together as a distinct curriculum, or, navigated individually, to build your own foundation. First-year students can begin by completing our two-semester humanities sequence CC 101 Ancient Worlds in the fall and CC 102 The Way in the spring. These two courses will establish a firm foundation in critical thinking and successful writing. Students who take our natural sciences sequence CC 111 Origins in the fall and CC 212 Reality, Science and the Modern World in the spring will see the role that science plays in our everyday lives.

Students can navigate a path through Core by completing the Minor in the Core Curriculum, the Minor in Core Independent Studies, or Core Honors (see below), each of which offers a liberal arts foundation to your chosen major. The Minor in the Core Curriculum is a great liberal arts foundation complementary to any major, while the Minor in Core Independent Studies enables students to pursue an interdisciplinary interest of their own while working closely with a faculty advisor. Core Honors allows particularly motivated students to further pursue topics and texts encountered in their Core classes.

Core also provides a springboard for students interested in leadership positions in residential, academic, and program support opportunities. Beyond the classroom, Core sponsors a full calendar of cultural and social events on campus, excursions in Boston and beyond, and even opportunities for summer study in Greece or winter break in Florence, Italy. Students enrolled in Core courses are eligible to live with other Core students from a variety of majors and class years in the Core House, or on the Core Floor of Warren Towers.

Learning Outcomes

Students enrolled in the Core Curriculum should be able to:

  • Demonstrate broad understanding of the essential content and intellectual context of the works and ideas studied.
  • In the Humanities, read, view, or hear the works studied with comprehension, demonstrating understanding of genre, style, and cultural and historical context.
  • In the Natural Sciences, demonstrate an understanding of fundamental scientific principles and methodology and a grasp of laboratory techniques and principles.
  • In the Social Sciences, demonstrate an understanding of fundamental principles and methodology of individual rights and freedom rooted in social theory.
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing, regarding the works and ideas studied.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelations of the various disciplines of Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences.

Requirements

All first-year, first-time students will pursue coursework in the BU Hub, a general education program that is integrated into the entire undergraduate experience.BU Hub requirements are flexible and can be satisfied in many different ways, through coursework in and beyond the major (or minor) and, in some cases, through cocurricular activities. Students taking only part of the Core Curriculum should consult the Core website, BU Hub Bulletin page, or Core Curriculum staff to learn which BU Hub requirements are met by the specific Core Courses they take. The Core academic program consists of eight 4-credit foundational courses: four Humanities courses, two Natural Sciences courses, and two Social Sciences courses. A 2- or 4-credit Digital Multimedia course and cocurricular activities based at the Museum of Fine Arts or editing the Core Journal complete the academic program.

First Year

Semester I

  • CAS CC 101 Core Humanities I: Ancient Worlds (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 111 Core Natural Sciences I: Origins: The Cosmos, Earth, Life, and Human Beginnings (4 cr)

Semester II

  • CAS CC 102 Core Humanities II: The Way: Antiquity and the Medieval World (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 212 Core Natural Sciences II: Reality, Science, and the Modern World (4 cr)

Second Year

Semester I

  • CAS CC 201 Core Humanities III: Renaissance, Rediscovery, and Reformation (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 221 Core Social Sciences I: Making the Modern World: Progress, Politics, and Economics (4 cr)

Semester II

  • CAS CC 202 Core Humanities IV: From Enlightenment and Romantic Revolt to the Modern World (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 222 Core Social Sciences II: Unmaking the Modern World: The Psychology, Politics, and Economics of the Self (4 cr)

Students pursuing a Minor in Core Independent Studies to build on the academic program will also complete the 2-credit capstone course, normally in the second year of study:

  • CAS CC 350 Core Capstone (2 cr)
Other Core Courses
  • CAS CC 220 Multimedia Encounters with Core Texts (2 cr)
  • CAS CC 320 Multimedia Encounters with Core Texts (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 301 Topics in Core Humanities (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 311 Topics in Core Natural Sciences (4 cr)
  • CAS CC 321 Topics in Core Social Sciences (4 cr)
  • HUB CC 181 Cocurricular: The Core Docent Program I (2 cr)
  • HUB CC 182 Cocurricular: The Core Docent Program II (2 cr)
  • HUB CC 192 Cocurricular: Collegiate Publishing Workshop: The Journal of the Core Curriculum (2 cr)

Honors in Core

Students who complete Core with a grade of B+ or higher in all of their courses may apply to do Honors in Core. Generally completed in the junior year, Core Honors entails close work with a Core faculty advisor on a major research paper or project bridging two Core courses or Core and a related course. Core Honors work is not done in the context of a course and is not credit-bearing, so that students may apply for UROP funding if desired. Students may also arrange to do Core Honors work in conjunction with a Directed Study (of either 2 or 4 credits) as appropriate.

Completion of the Core Curriculum with Honors is recognized with an annotation on students’ transcripts.

Sours: https://www.bu.edu/academics/cas/programs/core-curriculum/


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