Nevada unemployment pua

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  The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation offices and call centers are closed for all Federal and State holidays with the exception of Columbus Day
  Due to regularly scheduled system maintenance, the Division’s computer system may at times be unavailable on Saturdays starting at 1pm and could be down for the remainder of the day.
jail Unemployment insurance fraud is a crime in Nevada. Fraud is defined as making any false statement relating to a claim for benefits, deliberately withholding information to obtain benefits, failing to report all work and income during a week for which benefits is claimed, filing an unemployment claim while incarcerated or allowing another person to file a claim on your behalf while incarcerated and not disclosing the fact of being incarcerated, or using a name and/or Social Security Number other than your own to file a claim for benefits. If you are found to have committed fraud, you WILL be disqualified until all money is repaid, plus any penalties and interest. You may even be prosecuted for felony theft.
  It is against Federal Law to file for and receive benefits for Unemployment Insurance (including Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) and State Extended Benefits (SEB)) at the same time as Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).
PLEASE NOTE: If you file for and receive benefits from both programs at the same time, you will be disqualified and liable for the overpayment. This may also constitute fraud which is a felony in Nevada.
Sours: https://ui.nv.gov/

The Nevada Independent

Benefit programs that have buoyed hundreds of thousands of unemployed Nevadans for more than a year came to a hard stop over the weekend, raising concerns of a trying transition for those who have yet to find a job.

Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR) Director Elisa Cafferata said that while the Department of Labor has authorized states to use American Rescue Plan funds to continue benefits past Saturday’s deadline, her agency had no plans to do so. An extension would require a special legislative session, such a program would not come with federal money for administrative expenses and it would take that federal aid away from other possible uses, she said. 

“We've certainly taken a look at it,” Cafferata told The Nevada Independent. “But I think … we really just, for the long-term health of the economy, need to help folks get back to work.”

Programs that ended over the weekend include Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) for gig workers and the self-employed (nearly 40,000 were filing claims to Nevada’s program in the most recent week), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (nearly 76,000 enrolled), and a $300-per-week Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation add-on that applies to all of those claimants, as well as nearly 33,000 people on regular benefits. 

A small State Extended Benefits program serving fewer than 100 people ends this coming Saturday, leaving only the regular unemployment benefit program running, and even then only offering beneficiaries a maximum of 26 weeks of assistance.

The cutoff comes as Nevada’s economy has improved — the number of people on the unemployment rolls is fewer than half of the well over 300,000 it was during peak weeks earlier this year — but the state continues to have the worst jobless rate in the nation at 7.7 percent in July. About one-third of the jobs the state lost when the pandemic hit have not come back, according to DETR. 

Voices on all points of the spectrum acknowledged that the benefits cliff could be difficult for the more than 148,000 people who were claiming benefits as of Aug. 21. Amber Hansen, an administrator of a large Facebook group that supports PUA claimants, said there’s pervasive fear among members of her collective.

“They don't know what they're going to do. And they're scared out of their wits because they feel like there's just, there's nothing else for them to do,” she said. 

DETR officials said they had been warning beneficiaries for months that the programs, which have paid out nearly $13 billion since last March, would be coming to an end, and urged claimants to look for jobs. The agency has been communicating with claimants through their online portals, posting information about job opportunities on social media and sharing an evolving list of retraining opportunities.

“There are a lot of supports out there for them. And probably the best thing to do is just … start making this transition back to work, while you have all of these resources available to help you,” Cafferata said. 

But Hansen said the reality on the ground is much harsher than DETR portrays. The handout DETR provides lists resources that many claimants already know about, such as welfare programs and rental assistance, but may have been unable to tap into.

“I have worked single handedly over the last year with thousands of Nevadans … thousands of people that have applied for those programs and have either hit a wall have been told that they can't get help, have been told that they don't meet the criteria,” she said.

The CHAP rental assistance program in Clark County, for example, has helped 9,000 households since the pandemic began, but has 8,500 applications for aid still pending and has denied about 5,200 applications. Meanwhile, about 61,000 households in Nevada are projected to be behind on rent — mostly in Clark County.

If people in need are unable to successfully secure enough help, they could be part of an eviction wave. Even among those who have received rental assistance, there are people who are headed back to square one because the support is for a limited time.

“They've already tapped out their 12 months of benefits, and they're still unemployed, and now their unemployment's going away. And so what do they do?” said Jim Berchtold of the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada, which offers free help to tenants facing eviction. “It just really seems like there needs to be a bigger picture solution about job retraining and about figuring out what the issues are that are leading to the eviction and trying to address them.”

Lalo Montoya of progressive advocacy group Make the Road Nevada has seen firsthand how people can get lost in the system if they hit technology-related hurdles, language barriers, eligibility hang-ups or are otherwise confused by systems offering help. His organization helps those it can, but it doesn’t have the funding to serve as formal navigators who would personally guide the tens of thousands of people who need help.

“It's a crisis that I can't even put my head around,” he said. “Because at the end of the day, all we can do is help those that come to us directly or that we meet out on the streets or during tabling events. And I'm glad that when they do find us, they found that they find a voice, they found a place of advocacy, they find a place where they can go and be connected to navigate the systems. But we're doing it out of just survival.”

A disincentive effect?

Randi Thompson’s organization, the Nevada Federation of Independent Businesses, has been vocal in urging Nevada to end benefits earlier than Sept. 4, blaming them for exacerbating a worker shortage.

“We hope that the governor will not extend those extra benefits, because our small businesses are dying, we have businesses, restaurants that are closing early. They're not taking a dinner shift, they're closing on Sundays,” she said.

Gov. Steve Sisolak did not heed that call to curtail the benefits, but nor did he take the step of creating an additional state-level program to keep the benefits going into the fall.

Thompson said she’s still concerned about workers in industries that have not rebounded, such as those supporting conventions, which brought half a million attendees to Las Vegas in 2019 but zeroed out for a long stretch during the pandemic.

“I'm optimistic that those who have chosen to stay home and not work will decide to go back to work,” she said about the deadline. “My concern, still, is for those whose jobs are not there.”

A debate over whether the more-generous-than-usual pandemic-era benefits were disincentivizing people from returning to work has raged in the political sphere, prompting about half of governors — all Republicans — to voluntarily disenroll their states in certain benefit programs as a way to nudge the jobless back to the workforce. But an early analysis from the firm UKG suggests that states that cut the safety net early actually saw slower growth in the number of shifts worked than states that kept the benefits. 

Economists also largely believe that while benefits may serve as a minor disincentive to return to work, it is not a major factor, and a survey of the unemployed ranked benefits as the last on a list of reasons why they had not returned to work, behind reasons such as lack of child care, concerns about the spread of COVID, and having a spouse who is still in the workforce.

“People in other states are saying they thought they were going to stop the extended benefits and everyone would go right back to work and they're not seeing that either,” Cafferata said. “So I think there's gonna be just sort of this continued thing, settling out and what the new workforce looks like.”

Thompson said she believes “the mood of the workforce seems to be ‘I’ll come back, but you have to pay me more.’ And employers are realizing that's going to be the case.”

She said that might mean products and services go up in price, but she acknowledged that it’s a  shared responsibility with consumers to support jobs that offer workers enough to reach their American Dream.

“I hope you're gonna see a surge in employment,” she said. “We have well over 22,000 job openings in Northern Nevada. We have 90,000 job openings in Vegas. So, we have enough jobs to absorb the people that are unemployed.”

Do decisionmakers care?

Advocates for the unemployed are left wondering why elected officials didn’t do more to extend the program when so many people are still using it and major industries such as entertainment are far from recovered.

They worry that the loss of the program could accelerate evictions, prompting households to uproot and double up and thereby further spread COVID. They worry that the cutoff will force people into survival jobs with low pay, little security, and exposure to the virus.

“Our governor needs to do more. Our elected officials here need to do more. They need to extend the benefits. They need to apply for all the money that's being offered,” Montoya said. “I think they fell into the narrative that the chambers of commerce pushed on us. And they're listening to the corporations. They are not listening to workers.”

The deadline for the federally funded benefits program was set six months ago when Congress passed the American Rescue Plan. In that time, COVID dipped and surged, and now remains at one of its highest points of the pandemic. 

Asked whether the deadline is still appropriate while the health situation remains dire, Cafferata    noted that “there's always going to be an argument to be made to extend benefits.”

“It's going to be challenging for many individuals and their families,” she said. “This is just one last difficult transition, we hope, but I suspect we're going to have some ups and downs with COVID for quite some time.”

Thompson said it’s time to adapt. 

“We're gonna be living with COVID for the rest of our lives,” she said. “And it's time we all learn to live with COVID.”

From Hansen’s perspective, those in power are not showing enough compassion for the unemployed or taking nearly enough action to help. 

“This was something that was so important, and we feel like nobody cared,” she said. “It seemed like people would … gain interest and gain momentum, and then when they felt like their back’s against the wall by another party, they would just be like, ‘OK, well, our hands are tied.’”

While lawmakers have often talked about the emails and calls they receive from desperate claimants, Hansen said she doesn’t think they’ll truly register the struggle as long as they are personally financially secure.

“I just think that everybody just thinks that everything's all right and … excuse my language, they haven't really gotten into the thick of the shit like I have with my collective, to really absorb the suffering that these people have gone to,” she said.

Tabitha Mueller contributed to this report.

Sours: https://thenevadaindependent.com/article/as-unemployment-benefits-stop-for-close-to-150000-nevadans-observers-fear-tough-road-ahead
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What is Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)?

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) is a new temporary federal program that is part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The PUA program is available retroactive to February 2, 2020 through September 4, 2021 and provides benefits to eligible individuals.

PUA is separate from unemployment insurance and provides coverage only to individuals who are not eligible for regular unemployment insurance.

Who is Eligible for PUA?

PUA is available to Nevada workers who are unemployed, partially unemployed, unable to work or unavailable for work due to the COVID-19 pandemic and who are not eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. This includes many different groups of people:

  • Self-employed
  • 1099 contract workers
  • Gig workers
  • Employees whose wages are not reported for unemployment insurance
  • Employees who have not earned enough wages or worked enough hours for regular unemployment benefits
  • Individuals who were going to start work but could not due to COVID-19 pandemic

What does it mean to be affected by COVID-19?

To be eligible for PUA, your ability or availability to work must be affected by COVID-19. There are several different ways this could happen:

  • You have been diagnosed with or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and are seeking a medical diagnosis;
  • A member of your household has been diagnosed with COVID-19;
  • You are providing care for a family member or a member of your household who has been diagnosed with COVID-19;
  • Your child or other persons in the household for whom you are the primary caregiver is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and directly prevents you from working;
  • You are unable to reach your place of employment because of a quarantine or stay-at-home order due to the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • You are unable to reach your place of employment because you have been advised by a health care provider to self-isolate or quarantine because you are positive for or may have had exposure to someone who has or is suspected of having COVID-19;
  • You were scheduled to start a new job and do not have an existing job or are unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • You had to quit your job due to being diagnosed with COVID-19 and being unable to perform your work duties; 
  • Your place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • You are self-employed or an independent contractor and a slowdown in business due to COVID-19 has forced you to suspend operations;
  • You were denied continued unemployment benefits because you refused to return to work or accept an offer of work at a worksite that, in either instance, is not in compliance with local, state, or national health and safety standards directly related to COVID-19. This includes but is not limited to, those related to facial mask wearing, physical distancing measures, or the provision of personal protective equipment consistent with public health guidelines;
  • You provide services to an educational institution or educational service agency and are unemployed or partially unemployed because of volatility in the work schedule that is directly caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. This includes, but is not limited to, changes in schedules and partial closures; or
  • You are an employee and your hours have been reduced or you were laid off as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Who is not eligible for PUA?

Eligibility for PUA requires that an individual be unemployed, partially unemployed, or unable or unavailable to work in Nevada due to COVID-19, and that you not be eligible for any other unemployment insurance benefits. For example, you are not eligible for PUA if:

  • If you are eligible for a regular UI claim, PEUC or SEB
  • If you are able to work remotely without reduced pay
  • If you are receiving paid sick leave or other leave benefits
  • If you are unemployed, but not due to COVID-19
  • If you were not working in Nevada at the time you became unemployed due to COVID-19 and do not have a bona fide job offer to work in Nevada that you were unable to start due to COVID-19

I am filing for PUA benefits. What can I expect?

At this time, the PUA system is taking initial applications for benefits. There will be a number of questions to help determine your eligibility for PUA, based on how you were affected by COVID-19, when you became unemployed, and what your attachment is to the Nevada labor market.

  • Please use the earliest date that you became unemployed, partially unemployed, unable to work or unavailable for work due to COVID-19.
  • Be honest in all your answers.
  • Have documentation of all your earnings for the calendar year 2019 and 2020.
  • If you choose to receive a debit card instead of direct deposit, the card will not be sent until a benefit week is paid.

It is against Federal Law to file for and receive benefits for Unemployment Insurance (including Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) and State Extended Benefits (SEB)) at the same time as Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).

PLEASE NOTE: If you file for and receive benefits from both programs at the same time, you will be disqualified and liable for the overpayment. This may also constitute fraud which is a felony in Nevada.

How long will it take before I can get PUA payments?

DETR anticipates tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands of applications being submitted; likely all at once. We will have staff trained and ready to start processing these applications. Each claim requires a review for each week of PUA eligibility and will take some time. The Division recommends checking the website and your PUA account for any current/updated changes. During the application process, you will have the option to choose between direct deposit, which will process more quickly, or you may choose to receive a new debit card which will not be sent until a benefit week is paid.

What kind of documentation do I need to provide to show my previous income?

Documents which show your total income for the entire year such as tax documents are preferable, as these will allow a quicker review of your total earnings. Acceptable documentation you can provide may include but is not limited to:

  • W-2 or 1099 forms
  • Tax returns
  • Pay stubs
  • Bank receipts
  • Ledger
  • Invoices
  • Billing statements

Providing this documentation may increase your benefit amount based on a percentage of earnings. Documentation will need to be provided within the PUA application, documentation which has been sent to DETR through other means will not be transferred to PUA.

How do I participate in work search activities?

A work search is a good faith effort to find work and claimants are expected to use reasonable methods and conduct work search activities normal to their occupation. DETR has a number of programs and partners to help claimants with this process that includes training for a new high demand career, adult education and literacy programs, virtual support at Nevada JobConnect and in person support through Nevadaworks in Northern Nevada, and Workforce Connections in Southern Nevada. 

For more information on work search activities, watch this video.

Review this document for resources on how to promote your business, get help with business mentoring, and many other resources for small businesses and gig workers.

To meet the work search requirement, you will need to complete a mixture of activities, most days of the week. Think about doing something each day, Monday through Friday.

  • Create or update a resume
  • Create a profile on freelance or gig work websites
  • Participate in business networking
  • Learn how to expand your business by connecting with free mentoring programs
  • Connect with Small Business Administration resources
  • Promote and market your business to gain new clients

Be sure to document your work search effort. You can download and print a work search log here.

Documenting your work search includes printing confirmation emails, writing down the name, address, phone number and contact you spoke to when applying for a job. If you take a test for a potential job or participate in training, note those efforts as well.

Please click here to file for PUA

Have more questions?

Sours: https://test.detr.nv.gov/Page/Pandemic_Unemployment_Assistance(PUA)
Nevada unemployment: PUA website fixed; UI claimants still unable to file

Covid-19 (Coronavirus) Information Unemployment Insurance Filers and Employers Need to Know

Required MEUC Documentation

To determine MEUC eligibility, proof of self-employment net earnings in the amount of $5,000 must be provided to DETR. Acceptable documents include:

  • Income Tax return including Schedule C for the most recent taxable year ending prior to the unemployment claim; or
  • Pay stubs
  • Bank Receipts
  • Business Records
  • Ledgers
  • Contracts
  • Invoices
  • Billing Statements

MEUC FAST FACTS

What weeks will MEUC be paid for?

For eligible claimants, MEUC is payable beginning the week ending January 2, 2021 through week ending September 04, 2021.

How will I receive the $100 MEUC payments?

If you are receiving Unemployment Insurance, PEUC, or SEB benefits, your MEUC payments will be paid via the Nevada Unemployment Insurance Debit Card. You may check your updated balance and transaction record anytime day or night, even weekends and holidays, by visiting http://www.goprogram.com.

Where do I see my MEUC payment on my UI.NV.gov Claimant Self Service (CSS) account?

MEUC payment information is not currently viewable on the Claimant Self Service (CSS) portal at UI.NV.gov. The Division is developing that functionality and will update this information when it is available.

How do I Apply for MEUC

To file for MEUC, you will need to log onto your Claimant Self Service (CSS) portal at UI.NV.gov.

  • Select the MEUC navigational link on the left menu of the Claimant Self-Service Portal landing page and follow the instructions to apply for MEUC benefits.
  • Select the “Upload Documents” navigational link to upload MEUC Supporting Documentation.
  • Once the MEUC application is submitted, you will have five (5) business days to provide DETR with acceptable documentation supporting your self-employment net income of $5,000.

Claimants can also apply by speaking to a representative of the call center. Northern UI Claims Call Center (775) 684-0350; Southern UI Call Center (702) 486- 0350; Rural areas and Out-of-State (888) 890-8211. 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday.

How do I provide MEUC Supporting Documents?

You will be able to fax, mail, or upload supporting documentation. When uploading the documents, select "Upload Documents" navigational link to the left. You will need to select "MEUC Supporting Documents" for document name prior to completing the upload. Document that types that are acceptable for upload include: .doc, .docx, .docm, .xls, .xlsx, .txt, .pdf, .rtf, .snp, .msg, .tif, and .tiff.

When will I receive MEUC benefits?

Once the MEUC application is submitted, the normal adjudication process will follow. There is current back log and no specific time can be provided. Once the Adjudication Department determines the eligibility, a determination will be issued and can be viewed under “My Documents” via the Claimant Self Service portal at UI.NV.gov.

Will wages I earn affect my MEUC payment?

All wages must be reported on your weekly claim filing in the week they are earned. Any eligible week in which benefits are paid of at least $1 will receive the MEUC payment. If your reported wages are over your weekly benefit amount, you will not be eligible to receive MEUC payment for the week.

Is MEUC subject to Federal Income Tax?

Yes, MEUC is taxable income. If you have chosen to withhold Federal Income Tax from your unemployment insurance benefits, Federal Income Taxes will also be withheld from your MEUC payments. MEUC payments with taxes withheld will be reduced from $100 to $90.

Sours: https://detr.nv.gov/Page/Coronavirus

Pua nevada unemployment

Problems with final claims reported as PUA program ends

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — People who are trying to complete their final claims for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits are running into problems.

The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR) acknowledged the problems, but provided no details in a tweet today.

🚨DETR is aware that some PUA claim filers are experiencing problems with their final weekly claim for the week ending September 4, 2021.

DETR is working with the vendor on this critical fix. pic.twitter.com/41ZfUZc3cb

— DETR Nevada (@DetrNevada) September 9, 2021

DETR reports that they are working with a vendor to fix the problems.

The claims involved are for benefits during the final week of the PUA program, which provided benefits to self-employed workers and gig workers during the pandemic. The benefits programs expired on Saturday.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Sours: https://www.8newsnow.com/news/local-news/problems-with-final-claims-reported-as-pua-program-ends/
Nevada unemployment: PUA website fixed; UI claimants still unable to file
  Nevada Hardest Hit Fund -
Receiving unemployment benefits and in need of mortgage assistance? Find out if you qualify today!
  Email Scam Alert The Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation (DETR) was informed of a recent email phishing scam. Be advised that DETR does not send emails requesting credit card information. Please click here to learn more about this scam.
Popup Blocker Requirements To use the UInv claim filing system, please disable your browser's popup blocker.
  Monday through Friday from 8:00am to 8:00pm
  The Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation offices and call centers are closed for all Federal and State holidays with the exception of Columbus Day.
  Due to regularly scheduled system maintenance, the Division’s computer system may at times be unavailable on Saturdays starting at 1pm and could be down for the remainder of the day.
jail Unemployment insurance fraud is a crime in Nevada. Fraud is defined as making any false statement relating to a claim for benefits, deliberately withholding information to obtain benefits, failing to report all work and income during a week for which benefits is claimed, filing an unemployment claim while incarcerated or allowing another person to file a claim on your behalf while incarcerated and not disclosing the fact of being incarcerated, or using a name and/or Social Security Number other than your own to file a claim for benefits. If you are found to have committed fraud, you WILL be disqualified until all money is repaid, plus any penalties and interest. You may even be prosecuted for felony theft.

  It is against Federal Law to file for and receive benefits for Unemployment Insurance (including Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) and State Extended Benefits (SEB)) at the same time as Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).
PLEASE NOTE: If you file for and receive benefits from both programs at the same time, you will be disqualified and liable for the overpayment. This may also constitute fraud which is a felony in Nevada.
Sours: https://ui.nv.gov/css.html

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