Fujifilm xt20 photos

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Fujifilm X-T20 review: love, rekindled

Strolling through La Rambla in the heart of Barcelona this month, I saw and heard the full kaleidoscope of human cultures around me, but something wasn’t quite right. There was an anomaly about the tourists surrounding me. Not one of them was using, wearing, or carrying a camera. I was, in fact, the sole person with a dedicated camera in hand.

Smartphone cameras have grown so ubiquitous and competent that, even on an evening outing in a city center, most people now trust them to handle their photography needs. I would normally be one of those phone-only casual tourists, but on this occasion I was reviewing the Fujifilm X-T20 camera and was duty-bound to use it. I could anticipate getting better results than from my smartphone, of course, but what I didn’t expect was that the X-T20 would rekindle my love for this old-fashioned method of taking photos.

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

The Fujifilm X-T20 is everything that is good about technology. It’s a throwback to the days of necessarily rugged metal bodies, optical viewfinders, and entirely physical control schemes replete with satisfying clicks and clunks from mechanical switches and dials. But it elevates those laudable aspects of old-timey film cameras with judicious use of modern technology, including an electronic viewfinder, the same 24-megapixel APS-C sensor as inside the higher-end Fujifilm X-Pro2 and X-T2, and a reliable autofocus system that’s also very amenable to manual adjustment.

At $899 without any lenses included, the X-T20 is certainly a considered purchase for any newcomers to Fujifilm’s wares. I tested it with a set of prime lenses that would multiply its price, but you don’t have to go that far right away. The X-T20 contains Fujifilm’s best imaging processing to date — hardware that’d usually cost much more — and it marks an understandably high entry point into the company’s excellent lens ecosystem. You can have better and you can have cheaper, but this particular Fujifilm camera has proven the Goldilocks ideal for me.

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

If I were to rank my favorite cameras before coming across the Fujifilm X-T20, they would be the Google Pixel for its convenience, the Canon 5D Mark III for its astonishing sharpness and detail, and the Sony NEX-5N for its balance of the other two cameras’ strengths. The more I saw of what the Pixel could do, the more I thought the future would be exclusively smartphone shooters, on the one hand, and big and bulky full-frame DSLRs like the Canon, on the other. Smartphones have been steadily eroding the space for cameras like my Sony, but Fujifilm begs to differ.

Without exception, all of my reviewer colleagues who are enthusiastic about photography are enthusiastic about Fujifilm’s mirrorless camera range. Sean O’Kane, Sam Byford, and Dan Seifert have been using X-series cameras for years, and Chris Welch recently reviewed the $1,599 X-T2 under the title of “for the love of photography.” In that time, I’ve sat on the sidelines wondering what all the fuss is about. Yes, Fujifilm uses a retro two-tone styling, and it has a contoured grip, physical toggles and switches, and its own range of Fujinon lenses. But that’s the recipe that every other mirrorless camera maker has been following, too. What makes a Fujifilm camera special?

Let’s break down the X-T20 bit by bit. The camera body has a very regular, linear shape and a magnesium alloy frame that makes it feel extremely rigid and robust. The hump in the middle — which simulates the pentaprism chamber of single-lens reflex cameras — houses the pop-up flash and sits only slightly higher than the two large control dials at the top. There are also grip-enhancing protrusions on the right front and rear of the camera, both of them quite subtle. Fujifilm clearly prioritized minimizing size with the X-T20, which is narrower, shallower, shorter and almost 25 percent lighter than the X-T2.

I like the X-T20’s size and proportions because they allow me to detach the lens and store the camera inside slimmer bags and pockets than its larger siblings. That does come with trade-offs, though. The flap covering the battery and memory card slot, for instance, sits right next to the tripod mount — so you won’t be able to swap anything out with the T20 mounted up. You also don’t get the joystick control as you do on the X-T2 or X-Pro2, which is very convenient for shifting your focus point while shooting through the viewfinder. Photographers experienced with those higher-end bodies would tell you that the top control dials can feel cramped — though I, having come from using Sony’s far less intuitive controls, am glad that Fujifilm provides as many clearly labeled dials as it does. My only issue with them has been the rare accidental tweaking of the exposure dial on the far right.

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Electronic viewfinders have never previously been convincing enough to get me to switch away from composing images on the rear LCD of the camera, but the X-T20 has converted me. I now shoot exclusively through the T20’s EVF, oftentimes forgetting that it’s not a “real” optical viewfinder. This has marked a revolutionary change in my photography: in previous times, viewfinders have always equated to massive DSLRs that I’d only use on a work assignment. Now I’m finally tasting the hobbyist photographer lifestyle of the film era that I was previously too young and impoverished to know. It’s cool. I’m discovering an intimacy with my subject that no touchscreen LCD can hope to match.

Should you require a touchscreen LCD, though, the Fujifilm X-T20 has one of those too. It pops out and articulates vertically — so it can be used to compose shots far above or below eye level. The touch function allows you to pick a point for the camera to focus on, but I found it frustratingly imprecise on the T20 and just avoided it. It’s fine as a crutch for anyone fully habituated to touch interactions, but I consider it borderline sinful to get a camera as naturally intuitive as this and use it like a smartphone. Bonus reason to switch to the EVF full time: you’ll get a lot more shots out of a single battery charge. The X-T20 has a 1,200mAh battery that is good for somewhere around 300 frames when composing with the LCD and close to double that if you rely solely on the EVF. My trip to Barcelona produced 560 shots before I got the low battery warning.

Earlier this year, I used Sony’s $1,400 a6500 extensively, which is externally indistinct from that company’s a6300 camera that the X-T20 is priced to compete against. I can say with confidence that the Fujifilm X-T20 is a better stills camera than both Sony alternatives. The big Fujifilm advantages are in having a superior EVF, much more logical controls and better-sized buttons, and a body that’s only slightly lighter, but feels dramatically smaller than Sony’s due to its more symmetrical shape. Fujifilm also has a much, much better ecosystem of lenses to choose from — I don’t think it would be controversial for me to say that Fujifilm has the best selection of lenses to buy for any mirrorless camera system on the market today. Where Sony enjoys an advantage over Fujifilm is in autofocus speed and video-recording capabilities, both things that Sony is arguably the world leader in.


But let’s talk about those Fujifilm lenses. The most versatile 18-55mm kit lens is highly rated and it’s been discussed in our previous reviews, so I wanted to experiment with some of the pricier and more task-specific glass. For my testing, I used the X-T20 with four prime lenses: the 14mm f/2.8, the 23mm f/1.4, the 35mm f/1.4, and the 56mm f/1.2 APD. It was only after I did most of my shooting that I looked up the prices, which were $899, $899, $599, and, um, $1,499, respectively. Not knowing their prices actually helped me assess each as objectively as possible.

I found the telephoto 56mm, which is equivalent to 84mm on a full-frame camera, to be a fantastic portrait lens. Like a finely-balanced katana, it’s designed to just do one thing and be amazing at it. I took photos with that lens where I could see my reflection in the pupil of my subject’s eye (and I could also see every strand of hair on their face and every imperfection in their skin, which was less awesome). I hoped I could put this lens to use as a pseudo-macro lens, but that just wasn’t happening: its long minimum focusing distance and its somewhat indecisive autofocus were disappointing when applied to anything other than portraits.

  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
  • Jaguar E-Pace debut in London, July 2017 Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge

The other extreme, the 14mm lens, provided a handy tool for my car photography this month. I shot the majority of my Jaguar E-Pace photos with the 14mm lens mounted on the X-T20 (gallery above, first few photos are with the 35mm lens). This piece of glass is just on the right side of being a fisheye lens: it will distort things a fair amount, but so long as you’re not too close to the subject, that’s tolerable and a worthwhile compromise for being able to fit much more in the frame. One significant observation from my Jaguar shoot: I didn’t have to do any color balance adjustment when retouching the photos. That’s a consistent thread through all of my shooting with the Fujifilm X-T20: this camera’s automatic white balance is highly reliable.

The 23mm lens was, for whatever reason, the least exciting one for me, but the real star of the show was the 35mm XF lens. It’s probably because 23mm (equivalent to 35mm on a full-frame sensor) is the most common and versatile focal length that I found it boring to shoot with; the more zoomed-in 35mm let me compose photos that felt more active and dynamic. I can envision myself happily using the X-T20 with just the 35mm prime. It’s the smallest and lightest of the set I tested, and where it’s not able to fit everything in the frame, I can either use my legs to zoom out or, alternatively, live with a narrower snapshot.

It’s a little amusing that I enjoyed the cheapest Fujinon lens the most, but maybe that makes sense. Even though I shoot photos professionally, I still consider myself mostly a casual photographer — and as such it makes sense that I’d gravitate toward lower-tier products first, my needs aren’t that great. That’s also probably why I can be forgiving of the relatively slow autofocus speed from all of the Fujinon lenses I tested. This is not a sports photographer’s camera or lens kit at all. But for me, being patient with the autofocus and even manually finessing it on occasion — not because it was necessary, but because the focus rings on the lenses are a tactile delight and I really like the focus-assist highlight that shows up in the EVF — was just part of the ceremony of shooting with this camera.

I can’t explain why I was more patient with the X-T20 than I was with the far faster Sony a6500. Fujifilm’s camera just made me much more willing to forgive its shortcomings than Sony’s did, and that has to do with the imperceptible aspects of good design.

Other than my observations about image quality above, you already know you’ll get Fujifilm’s best because the image sensor and processing engine from the company’s flagship cameras have been brought down in price and size with the X-T20. If you love the output of the Fujifilm X-T2 or X-Pro2 — and you really should, they’re technically fantastic cameras that produce beautiful images — you’ll feel the same way about the X-T20. Except this newer camera costs $700 less. Given the choice between a heavier and bulkier X-T2 (with admittedly more accommodating ergonomics) and an X-T20 plus my favored 35mm f/1.4 lens, I’m taking the latter combo any day of the week.

The major difference for me personally, in stepping up from my finely aged NEX-5N camera, is that the Fujifilm X-Trans sensor gives me a ton more ISO room to play with. I can shoot at ISO 3200 and even 4000 without having to worry about excessive noise ruining the picture. I made the decision early on with the T20 to shoot in RAW format, and that choice was rewarded in Lightroom when I saw how easily I could recover detail from highlights and shadows, and how natural the results looked. The color fidelity in low-light photos and the dynamic range of this camera are both outstanding, and there’s vast room for retouching improvement with Fujifilm’s .RAF files, which hit a whopping 50MB per frame if you opt to keep them uncompressed.

It’s tough for me to decouple the pleasure of shooting with the X-T20 from its eventual results. The process of capturing images with this camera is more satisfying than any other I’ve known (except maybe Fujifilm’s own X-Pro2, which I’ve only flirted with). Smartphones feel impersonal and, if I’m honest, kind of half-assed, like I don’t really care about the photo I’m taking. Full-fat DSLRs, on the other hand, would suggest that I care too much.

As for other mirrorless camera systems like those offered by Sony or Olympus, I’d go with Sony if video was my priority — the X-T20 can shoot very reasonable 4K video, but it’s not in the same class as Sony’s cameras. Olympus has previously tempted me with the endearingly tiny and affordable OM-D E-M10 Mark II, but that just doesn’t feel like enough of a step up from smartphone photography for me. No alternative camera system feels as sound an investment of my money as Fujifilm does.

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Fujifilm’s mirrorless cameras are simply better. Our reviews of these cameras tend to devolve into emotional expositions about passion for the art of photography, but ultimately Fujifilm just wins on all the practical fronts that matter. The X-T20 has the best viewfinder, best ergonomics, and best image quality in its price class. The Fujinon XF lens ecosystem is unrivaled. If there’s any problem for this camera, it’s in convincing people that it’s worth trying — because I’m confident that once they do, they’ll fall in love with it just as I did.

Sours: https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/26/16019768/fujifilm-xt20-camera-review-price-release

The Fujifilm X-T20 is one of the most popular mid-range models in the X-Series. It features a 24MP APS-C sensor with an X-Trans III array, a reliable hybrid autofocus system with C-AF custom settings to fine-tune the performance and 4K video recording at 30fps.

  • Announcement date: January 19th 2016
  • Release date: March 2016

In this post, you can look at some of our favourite sample images captured with the Fujifilm X-T20 since we purchased it in 2016. You can also download SOOC JPG and RAW files by following the dedicated links after the gallery.


Ethics statement:We bought the Fujifilm X-T20 for long-term review and comparison purposes. We were not asked to write anything about the camera, nor were we provided with any sort of compensation. Within the article, there are affiliate links. If you buy something after clicking the link, we will receive a small commission. To know more about our ethics, you can visit our full disclosure page. Thank you!


Fujifilm X-T20 Sample Images

The following is a gallery of Fujifilm X-T20 sample RAW images, all of which were edited in Adobe Lightroom and exported as JPGs. Each image includes information about the lens and settings used.


SOOC JPG and RAW Samples to Download

The following is a selection of untouched SOOC JPG and RAW samples for you to download and play with. (Note that Fujifilm RAW files are called RAF.)


Fujifilm X-T20 Comparisons

If you’re curious to find out more about the capabilities of the Fujifilm X-T20 and how it compares to other models on the mirrorless segment, here are some comparisons for you to browse through!


Check price of the Fujifilm X-T20 on Amazon | Amazon UK | eBay | B&H Photo

Categories GalleriesSours: https://mirrorlesscomparison.com/galleries/fujifilm-xt20-sample-images/
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Fuji X-T20 Review

This is an unbiased, comprehensive Fuji X-T20 review by Mark Maya, a photographer and educator from Durham, NC.

Mark is a wedding and portrait photographer who has written a review on the Fuji X-T20 based on his experiences using it both personally and professionally.

All images are his own (taken with the XT20) except for those of the camera itself (which were taken on an X100F).

Fuji X-T20 Review Summary

If there’s one major takeaway regarding the Fuji X-T20, it’s that this little camera is a pleasure to use. Packing a bunch of professional-quality features into a very affordable package, it’s equally perfect for the hobbyist or pro. It features a 24MP sensor, improved AF system and tilting LCD screen.

Fuji X-T20 | Introduction

Pros
  • Great value for money
  • Excellent image quality
  • Stylish, lightweight design
  • Tilting LCD screen
Cons
  • Not weather resistent
  • Low battery life and no support for battery grip

Check current price

Since the release of the Fujifilm X100 back in 2011, I’ve been a Fuji camera fan.  The X100 changed how I looked at my gear, where I took photos and increased my willingness to “play”.

I see the X100 as a “hobbyist” camera.  Since then Fujifilm has released an incredible line up of hobbyist and professional “X-Series” cameras including 3 more versions of the X100, X-T2, X-Pro2 and the GFX 50S respectively.

As Fujifilm has entered into the “professional photography” world with this lineup I feel that they might have initially created a large gap between the hobbyist and the pro. 

In my opinion, the Fuji X-T20 closes that gap by delivering the functionality and quality that the pros need while providing an affordable price, creative options and mobility that hobbyists want.

New Features

Fuji X-T20 review sample photo

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 35mm f/1.4R | 1/4000 sec at f/1.4, ISO 100

Here are the most relevant new features of the Fuji X-T20 when compared to the previous X-T10:

  • Touchscreen control
  • 325-point autofocus system
  • Higher-resolution 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III sensor (up from 16.2MP in X-T10)
  • 4K video

I’ve shot in Live View for a couple of years using the 5D Mark lll and the Fujifilm X100.  One of the key factors that was missing for me was the touchscreen.

The Fuji X-T20 comes with an up and down tilting LCD screen that allows you to touch focus, touch shoot, swipe through photos and magnify.  This helps with quick changes of perspective and angles during shoots and allows me to ensure focus and exposure are correct, and to see playback significantly quicker than the above mentioned cameras.

The Fuji X-T20 comes with the same auto-focus system as the Fuji X-T2, providing a wickedly fast 325-point auto-focus system for photos and video.  I found this to be one of the big factors that set it apart from the X100.

The auto-focus speed has been improved greatly on the Fuji X100F, but it’s still faster on the Fuji X-T20.

Fuji X-T20_Review

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 56mm f/1.2R | 1/4000 sec at f/1.2, ISO 100

The new 24.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor paired with the improved image processor gives the user the ability to shoot at 2x the speed of its predecessor.

This was also a massive shift towards the “professional” camera because after years of talking to other photographers about the “mirrorless revolution”, the most common hesitancy was that they were simply too slow.

Finally, the Fuji X-T20 offers a bump in resolution over its predecessor, and can also shoot 4K and 1080p video. This can easily be chosen in the dial on the top of the camera.

Other notable features include:

  • Electronic viewfinder with 62x magnification
  • 4K video shoots at up to 30fps and HD video at up to 60 fps – both are usable with the in-camera film simulation
  • 8 fps continuous shooting with AF, 5 fps with live view
  • 5mm jack for external microphone
  • Multiple Exposure mode in the dial options

Fuji X-T20 Image Quality

Sample from Fuji XT20

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 35mm f/1.4R | 1/1000 sec at f/1.4, ISO 100

Image quality in the Fuji X-T20 is truly something.  During my first shoot with it I honestly had low expectations as I had been slightly disappointed in the X100’s “professional quality” 16MP files which I purchased for a few hundred dollars less around 4 years ago.

I shot the session just before the sun went down for a friend and just wanted to see how the Fuji X-T20 performed.  On the back of the camera the photos looked beautiful but I knew the true test was when I edited them.

Once I started editing the files I quickly realized that this wasn’t the same as the X100. Not even close.

fujifilm xt20 sample image

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 35mm f/1.4R | 1/4000 sec at f/1.4, ISO 100

It turns out that the Fuji X-T20 has the exact same 24MP X-Trans III sensor and image processor as the Fuji X-T2 and Fuji X-Pro2, so in essence I was editing the same quality of files as the more expensive and professional cameras that Fujifilm had previously released.

Every RAW file is 6000 x 4000 pixels and packed with just as much sharpness, dynamic range and color as I’d expect from any professional camera.

In post-production, I spent less time culling and editing the files from the Fuji X-T20 than I did from my Canon 5D Mark lll, because of the accuracy of the auto-focus and the electronic viewfinder.

The SOOC files (straight out of camera) already had many of the tones and colors that I normally edited with because I was able to add +1 sharpening, -1 shadow tones and -1 highlight tones along with Fuji’s unique in-camera “Provia” film simulation.

Fuji XT20 SOOC images

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 35mm f/1.4R | 1/4000 sec at f/1.4, ISO 200

This made editing simpler and a lot more fun during post-processing in Lightroom and Alien Skin Exposure as I generally do.

Above you can see the SOOC image alongside my final image with my post processing a slight crop applied.

Fuji X-T20 Design

I was pleasantly surprised when I first held the Fuji X-T20 .  At 13.5 ounces with the dimensions 118 x 83 x 41mm, I felt like I was holding the X100 or another point and shoot camera. The only difference was I could choose from the awesome selection of Fuji lenses now.

Somehow Fujifilm packed in professional quality to a cool, minimal and lightweight design.   The functionality of the design stays true to Fujifilm’s “retro” feel utilizing the usual dials on top and incorporating the toggle buttons on the back.

Fuji XT20 dials

Besides the simple size of the camera, the buttons and dials, LCD screen mobility and the ability to manually adjust the exposure triangle makes shooting with the X-T20 less about shooting and more about the creative process and photos.

In fact, the combination of its small size, light weight, excellent image quality and fast auto-focus makes the Fuji X-T20 one of the best travel cameras I’ve ever come across.

Autofocus

The Fuji X-T20 has 3 “auto focus” modes.  “Single AF”, “Continuous AF” and “MF” (manual focus). I found myself going back and forth between the “Single AF” and the “Continuous AF”, testing out the capabilities of each and how the camera responded to each.

In the end I found the “Single AF” to be the best for me when shooting portraits with more still subjects while the “Continuous AF” was best for events, shooting kids and moving subjects.

Fuji xt20 review autofocus sample image

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 56mm f/1.2R | 1/2000 sec at f/1.2, ISO 100

The “Continuous AF” mode has a tracking feature that worked generally well.  The “Single AF” speed was very fast and accurate.

Generally comparing to my experience with the 5D Mark lll, I was able to shoot less and keep more photos because of the accuracy of the the autofocus system in the X-T20.

Viewfinder and Touchscreen

I found the electronic viewfinder (EVF) on the Fuji X-T20 to be more functional comparatively to the X100 due to the refresh speed, and definitely more useful than the Canon 5D Mark lll (or any dSLR camera) in that it gave me the “live view” in the viewfinder.

This was helpful during my shoots in the middle of the day where it’s normally difficult to see the LCD screen on the back of the camera because of glare.

As someone who uses “live view” often, I found this to be a great addition to evaluate exposure, focus and composition at a faster speed than I’m used to. Indeed, the EVF is a huge advantage of all mirrorless cameras.

Fuji xt20 flip out touchscreen

As I previously mentioned, the tilting touchscreen was a feature that gave me mobility, creative flexibility, and gave me options to change angles with a higher “keep rate” percentage than usual.  It allowed me to compose, focus and increased my visibility during shooting at twice the speed.

The simple “tilting” feature was the game-changer for me because it took away my need to lay on the ground or stand on a stool to get well focused, exposed and composed photos.

Value for Money

Fujifilm xt20 review

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 35mm f/1.4R | 1/500 sec at f/1.4, ISO 200

When you compare the Fujifilm X-T20 to its more professional older brother, the X-T2 (and similar cameras), then you’ll easily see that it’s one of best bargains on the market.

Sure you’re giving up a few bells and whistles like weather resistance, battery grip option, higher EVF magnification, lower ceiling shutter speed of 1/4000 (compared to 1/8000 in the X-T2) but with the exact same sensor, smaller size and weight, the ability to use the best Fuji lenses and coming in at almost half the price of the X-T2, the X-T20 is “pound-for-pound” one of best value mirrorless cameras out there.

I think this is especially true if you’re wanting to create “professional” looking images but aren’t that concerned with the extras that tend to jack the price up!

Check current price

Areas of Improvement

One of the first issues I had with the Fuji X-T20 was how SD card slot was strangely crowded.  I have average size fingers but as I started inserting and taking out the card I started to wonder if someone with larger fingers would get frustrated with this.

Video is becoming more and more popular in the photography community so I was excited to see a jack for an external microphone hoping that I would be able to use my Rode microphones with the X-T20.  After further inspection I was disappointed to learn that the jack size was only 2.5mm.  This is the increasingly uncommon smaller size jack than our usual 3.5mm size.

As an artist I find this to be a huge flaw and hindrance for photographers who also shoot video.  Another area of improvement regarding “jacks” is the lack of the “headphone jack” where you can monitor audio while shooting video but this is less important than the standard jack size for the actual microphone.

I’m 5’9 and have always struggle to get those higher angles during shoots without a step ladder or stool.  This was one of the reasons that I started shooting in live view so much.  Although the X-T20 has a tilting screen that tilts up 90 degrees and down 45 degrees, I found that the downward tilting angle was where I was using it most and couldn’t quite get the visual accessibility to the screen that I truly wanted.

I think the screen could be able to tilt down to 90 degrees rather than 45 and possibly a “flip out” and “swivel”  the screen to take the X-T20 to the next level of versatility.

I like that my RAW photos have the film simulation options inside of the X-T20 but when I try to add the “advanced filters” like “miniature”, “toy camera”, “pop color”, etc. then my files are automatically shot in the JPEG format.  As a result, I will not using these filters but would love to see RAW capabilities paired with them in the future.

Fuji_XT20_Review_Shotkit

Fuji X-T20 + Fuji 35mm f/1.4R | 1/4000 sec at f/1.4, ISO 200

One feature of the X-T2 that professional photographers loved was the “weather resistant” body.  Fujifilm omitted this feature in X-T20 possible due to it’s minimal, compact design. For the pro this might be one of the deciding factors when choosing whether the X-T20 is a good fit for them or not.

Battery life in mirrorless cameras has been a huge issue since their birth many a few years ago.  They just simply don’t last as long as the DSLRs do.  The X-T20 is no exception coming at a battery life of around 350 frames when using the XF35mmF1.4 R with the LCD monitor ON.

Connecting to battery issues,  the Fuji X-T20 lacks the ability to use a battery grip so the photographer can simply shoot longer without having to change out batteries.  This is another big difference in the X-T2 and the X-T20 when pros are comparing the two.

Fuji X-T20 Review | Conclusion

fuji review xt20

The Fujifilm X-T20 has all the features that a hobbyist or pro would need at a price that both will love.  I’ve yet to see another camera that has this many professional features packed into such a versatile, functional and well-designed camera.

With a minimal amount of design flaws and the inclusion of the professional sensors, the Fujifilm X-T20 will be giving others cameras in it’s field a run for their money and challenge the industry to provide professional quality at an affordable price.

Guest Review by photographer and educator Mark Maya | www.markmayaphoto.com

Disclaimer: All recommendations are impartial and based on user experience, with no bias to the products or the brand. The products in this post may contain affiliate links.

Sours: https://shotkit.com/fuji-xt20-review/
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