Ford explorer hybrid 2021 mpg

Ford explorer hybrid 2021 mpg DEFAULT

Review: 2021 Ford Explorer Limited Hybrid

If you’re looking for a large family SUV with three rows of seating and you also want it to be hybrid you pretty much have two choices: the Toyota Highlander Hybrid, and the subject of this review, the Ford Explorer Hybrid.

Both of these near full-size SUVs are on a mission to save you money at the pumps. But both go about it quite differently.

If absolute efficiency is your main criteria, the Toyota will serve you well. However, if passing power and the largest towing capacity are what you need, the Ford would likely fare better.

I found the Explorer to be a bit of a mixed bag, one that I wanted to like more than I did, mainly because I dig the way it looks. I feel the Explorer’s evolutionary styling has reached a high point with this latest iteration. Its slim headlamps, commanding grille, wide stance, and muscular proportions strike a great balance between elegance and utility and would fare just as well at the valet as it would on the school run. And if you aren’t keen on advertising the greenness of your vehicle, you’d be happy to note that it took me a few minutes to spot the tiny little hybrid badge on the rear liftgate, so telling this apart from your run-of-the-mill Explorer is virtually impossible for all but the most knowledgeable.

2021 Ford Explorer Hybrid

The cabin on the other hand is a bit of a letdown with a sombre design, some poorly fitted trim pieces, and a tacked on infotainment screen that looks like an afterthought. More expensive trims come with an even larger, rather goofy-looking portrait-oriented screen, making me happy that my tester wasn’t equipped with it.

There are good things, though, like a myriad of thoughtful storage cubbies, ample room to move about, including in the third row where my 6-foot frame was able to fit just fine, a large cargo area, and generally excellent ergonomics with plenty of physical buttons and knobs so you don’t need to dive into the infotainment to do something like turn on the heated seats, or the A/C.

2021 Ford Explorer Hybrid

The Hybrid powertrain is available exclusively on the Limited Trim so it comes well equipped out of the box with intelligent 4WD, 20-inch wheels, voice-activated navigation, a terrain management system with multiple drive modes, 360 degree camera, wireless charge pad, remote start, and a heated steering wheel. You also get standard second-row captain’s chairs and a power-folding third row.

Ford’s Co-Pilot 360 driver assistance is also standard and it includes adaptive cruise control, lane centering, evasive steering assist, and speed sign recognition.

You’ll pay quite a bit for all this with a base price of $53,799 representing quite a premium over a base level Highlander Hybrid, although the Ford does give you more content.

Where the Toyota uses a 4-cylinder and a CVT, Ford ups the ante with a 3.3-litre V6, and a 10-speed automatic transmission. An electric motor sandwiched in between the engine and transmission provides extra power and torque. The Highlander uses a trio of small motors including one on the rear axle for electric all-wheel drive. The Explorer uses a real mechanical AWD system.

With a combined power output of 318 hp and 322 lb-ft of torque, the Explorer Hybrid feels downright muscular with a great exhaust note and chunky power delivery that you wouldn’t expect from a hybrid. A 1.5 kWh battery pack provides electric operation for short distances at lower speeds and under light throttle usage.

The problem here is that the Explorer is a heavy vehicle and that small battery pack can only do so much, so you’ll be dipping into gasoline power more often than not. I try to drive hybrids like I do their gas-only counterparts and with the Explorer Hybrid my mixed road driving netted a rather disappointing 14L/100 km. With about 60 per cent of that on city streets, your experience might vary but the Highlander Hybrid I drove a few months prior used just 7L/100km, exactly half the fuel the Explorer did. And that’s really hard to ignore.

2021 Ford Explorer Hybrid

It’s an enjoyable drive, though, with an abundance of torque, whisper-quiet operation, and a comfortable and planted ride. The rear-biased 4WD system is also excellent on a snowy road, and even equipped with an all-season tire, the Explorer felt confident and controllable. That’s still not an excuse for not fitting a real set of winter tires, as traction is still limited. 4WD might get you going faster, but it doesn’t make an ounce of difference when it comes to slowing back down.

If there’s one thing that gets in the way of the driving experience, it’s the 10-speed automatic and its clunky shifts, more obvious at low speeds. I found it indecisive and prone to gear hunting, getting downright confused as to what gear it should be in under certain scenarios.

There’s a lot of good things about the Explorer and I feel given time it will be a much better overall product than it is right now. You should definitely not dismiss it because it’s a very good family vehicle, the tech is easy to use and works really well, and if you’re familiar with Ford products you’ll probably really like it.

I would, however, recommend against the hybrid. The base turbocharged 4-cylinder is just as powerful and only slightly less efficient. Natural Resources Canada actually rates its fuel consumption lower on the highway. And it will even tow more.

Sours: https://www.wheels.ca/car-reviews/review-2021-ford-explorer-limited-hybrid/

2021 Ford Explorer

2021 Ford Explorer HEV RWD 6 cyl, 3.3 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:27

combined

city/highway

MPG

3.7 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer RWD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:24

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.2 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer RWD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 10-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:24

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.2 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer RWD 6 cyl, 3.0 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:21

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.8 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer AWD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:23

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.3 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer AWD 6 cyl, 3.0 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:20

combined

city/highway

MPG

5.0 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer AWD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 10-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:23

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.3 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer FFV AWD 6 cyl, 3.3 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:19

combined

city/highway

MPG

5.3 gals/ 100 miles

E85

Combined MPG:13

combined

city/highway

MPG

7.7 gal/100mi

2021 Ford Explorer HEV AWD 6 cyl, 3.3 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:25

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.0 gals/ 100 miles

2021 Ford Explorer Timberline AWD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic (S10) Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:21

combined

city/highway

MPG

4.8 gals/ 100 miles

Sours: https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/bymodel/2021_Ford_Explorer.shtml
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Ford’s got something of a problem on its hands with the Explorer Hybrid it introduced last year.

Well, two problems, actually. For starters, it’s pretty pricey, adding $3,000 to the already expensive Limited trim – the only one available with the optional gas–electric powertrain. Then there’s the issue of its relative inefficiency. It’s one of only two SUVs of its kind on the market, yet compared to the gas–electric Toyota Highlander this three-row from Ford isn’t especially miserly. In fact, the 2021 Ford Explorer Hybrid is barely better than average compared to purely gas-powered sport utilities its size.

It does, however, have an ace in the hole that makes obsolete one of the strongest arguments against hybrid SUVs over the years: it can haul with the best of them.

Fuel Economy: 7/10

But first, the bad news. While the Highlander Hybrid manages to sip fuel like a compact car, the Explorer Hybrid burns it like just about any other three-row SUV. That’s because unlike Toyota, which uses a four-cylinder gas engine and a few different electric motors in its big hybrid, Ford has gone in a different direction altogether.

With a 3.3L V6 under the hood and a 33-kW electric motor nestled between it and the transmission, the Explorer Hybrid burns only a little less gas than the base turbo four-cylinder this powertrain replaces for its $3,000 price premium. Its fuel consumption ratings of 10.1 L/100 km in the city, 9.0 on the highway, and 9.6 combined don’t exactly jump off the page, barely besting that base engine – not to mention most non-hybrid SUVs this size – though they weren’t especially difficult to match during testing.

An initial evaluation loop spanning a little more than 200 km – nearly 25 per cent of which were done purely under electric propulsion, according to the trip computer – saw the Explorer turn in a combined average consumption of 9.7 L/100 km. To put that into perspective, the V6-powered Honda Pilot returned an average of 10.9 L/100 km during fall testing, while the Highlander Hybrid burned just 6.4 L/100 km.

Power: 9/10

Instead, this hybrid’s strengths lie in its decidedly un-hybrid qualities. Take the combined system output of 318 hp and 322 lb-ft of torque that far exceeds its rival from Toyota. But more than that, it’s the way it performs that makes this version of the Explorer feel unlike what the hybrid moniker typically implies.

Get on the gas pedal, and the electric motor kicks in with enough immediate torque to make this SUV downright quick. No, it doesn’t have the same sense of urgency as the 400-hp Explorer ST, but this is an impressively peppy people-mover in its own right.

While the 10-speed automatic transmission that sends power to the standard all-wheel drive system suffers from clunky and occasionally awkward operation, the gas–electric Explorer doesn’t perform like any hybrid this author has driven. Typically, it’s obvious when this type of powertrain is working away – yes, even the best of the bunch that switch between gas and electric operation all but seamlessly.

Here, however, it’s satisfying to listen to the naturally aspirated engine as it smoothly and sternly runs towards the 7,000 rpm redline, the 3.3L coming across with all kinds of confidence as the revs climb. In fact, much of the time behind the wheel is spent with very few reminders that this is a hybrid at all.

Driving Feel: 9/10

A colleague that drove the Explorer Hybrid prior to its launch complained of a lack of top-end torque, which could leave the 2,254-kg (4,969-lb) sport-utility feeling lethargic when passing or merging, though it appears any such issues have been addressed. While the transmission has a tendency to hesitate upon initial request for more momentum, there’s enough pure V6 power once it does respond to pile on some extra speed in a hurry.

Scrubbing that speed isn’t exactly perfect, the regenerative brakes offering uneven performance throughout the pedal’s travel, though it’s easy enough to learn the nuances of the system with some practice. While offering next to no initial bite or feel and not much progression through the pedal, the brakes suddenly – and somewhat surprisingly – bring the more than two-tonne family hauler to a halt.

Trending in the opposite direction is the Explorer’s weighty steering that’s suited perfectly to its size. Too many SUVs like this have feather-light steering systems that betray the mass being moved, but the feedback and resistance here is about as good as it gets. While straightforward and easy to operate, there’s the welcome addition of a proper sense of which way the front wheels are pointed that’s rare in this segment.

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Comfort: 9/10

Ride quality is a touch springy and not quite as refined as others in the segment, including the GMC Acadia Denali and its optional adaptive dampers or the conventionally sprung Mazda CX-9 that seems to employ some sort of witchcraft, though it’s only a short step behind those non-hybrid entries. This version of the Ford Explorer also benefits from the boosted damping ratio that hybrids typically require to counter the extra weight they carry, leading to a planted feel over rolling pavement.

The Explorer Hybrid also nails the basics of occupant comfort, with outstanding seats in the first two rows and an excellent tri-zone automatic climate control system. Up front, driver and passenger get three-stage heated and ventilated seats that reach their desired settings quickly, while the second-row seats and steering wheel are also heated.

User Friendliness: 9/10

That the Explorer has grown so much over the years – 369 mm (14.5 in) has been added to its overall length since the first generation that launched 30 years ago, while it’s been widened 221 mm (8.7 in) – makes this one of the roomiest three-rows of its kind. While there’s another class of body-on-frame models like the Ford Expedition and GMC Yukon that are larger still, this crop of SUVs the Explorer helped to popularize is just a little more agreeable in everyday life while still offering generous accommodations.

In fact, user-friendliness is second to none in the segment with this sixth-gen version, which comes fitted with all kinds of thoughtful touches that should make living with it that much easier. While it boasts 209 mm (8.2 in) of ground clearance, entering and exiting the Explorer takes little effort, its low and wide entryways requiring little more than a sideways shuffle. The doors open almost a full 90 degrees, which is particularly helpful when loading little ones into car seats in the back, while the doors themselves extend to the bottoms of the rocker panels to keep road grime off of pant legs.

There’s other handy stuff, too, like wide steps inside the back doors that make accessing roof-mounted cargo a breeze (roof rails are standard), and, in this Limited-based hybrid model, power-folding third-row seats that aren’t just stowed at the push of a button, but can be brought upright again using their motorized mechanisms.

Switchgear in the front half of the cabin is well sorted and easy to identify at a glance; knobs for audio volume and tune sit above a bank of buttons for climate control, while the rotary gear selector – not your humble author’s favourite method of operating a transmission – is logically located on the centre console. Controls on the steering wheel are as simple as they get, while the touchscreen display mounted atop the dash is as responsive as they come.

Practicality: 9/10

Other praiseworthy areas of the cabin include all the places personal items can be stashed. The door pockets both front and back are generously sized, while the centre console features a deep covered bin in addition to more covered storage beneath the HVAC controls. Since that’s where devices are connected to the standard smartphone interfaces – both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are equipped, as are USB-A and USB-C ports – there’s a handy little cutout that allows cables to be run with the lid closed, and a convenient smartphone-sized slot that keeps devices out of the cupholders.

There’s more clever storage behind the powered tailgate, with a shallow underfloor compartment to stash stuff, though the lack of a tonneau cover is an odd omission (Ford doesn’t even offer one optionally). That’s something of a shame not just because such retractable covers are all but expected in order to keep prying eyes off of any cargo being carried, but also because of how well the Explorer does in that regard.

The 528 L with all rows of seats upright is among the best in the segment, and allows autoTRADER.ca’s cargo-testing pedal car to fit horizontally behind the third-row bench – a rare feat amongst SUVs this size. Stowing the furthest row in the floor results in 1,264 L, while folding the second row leaves 2,132 L. Both measures mean less outright space than segment leaders like the Honda Pilot or Volkswagen Atlas, though what’s provided is still quite generous.

Room for people is equally accommodating, with your 6-foot-3 author able to even fit fairly comfortably in the third row. Naturally, the second set of seats provides even more space to stretch out, with plenty of shoulder-, leg-, and headroom. The Explorer is also unique in the segment for its standard captain’s chairs in the second row; opting for a three-seat bench is a $500 upgrade here, though it’s generally the other way around.

But perhaps this SUV’s best feature when it’s time to move people and their stuff is its ability to tow. It’s here that describing the Ford Explorer Hybrid as average is actually a compliment, as it boasts the same 2,268-kg (5,000-lb) towing capacity of most gas-only sport utilities this size. While the Toyota Highlander Hybrid does a lot right, its biggest shortcoming is its inability to move anything meaningful. Its tow rating of 1,588 kg (3,500 lb) is respectable given all the extra weight of the hybrid components it carries, but it’s down significantly compared to the average three-row sport utility.

Since the Explorer Hybrid uses a V6 engine instead of a four-cylinder like the gas-electric Highlander, it boasts an impressive ability to tow – and not just because of what’s written on paper. With a car hauler hooked up to the back and a Mazda3 compact sedan strapped to it, this three-row was pushed pretty close to its maximum capacity and yet it had no trouble whatsoever. With linear torque delivery up its peak at 3,000 rpm and beyond, there’s plenty of pulling force to keep the convoy moving. When more momentum was requested during a steady hill climb at highway speed the 3.3L happily obliged, working with the transmission in tow/haul mode to pass a slower-moving truck without a problem.

Features: 8/10

The optional hybrid powertrain can only be added to the Explorer Limited trim, which comes fairly well featured – though it may leave some shoppers lusting after a more luxurious experience. The leather upholstery isn’t Lincoln-grade, though it seems durable enough to withstand family life. Families on the go should benefit from some other features, too, like the built-in Wi-Fi hotspot, the comfortable and supportive seats with their climate settings, and the various power connections throughout the cabin, including a grounded 150-watt household outlet.

Safety: 9/10

It’s not short on safety equipment, either, with the majority of the latest stuff from Ford along for the ride. A surround-view system (that’s in addition to the government-mandated back-up camera), front and rear parking sensors, LED lighting all around, automatic high-beams, and rain-sensing wipers all come standard, as does automatic emergency braking, lane-departure warning and lane-keep assist, and blind-spot monitoring that can be set to include the length of any trailer being towed. There’s also adaptive cruise control with steering assist, though it can also be used without the steering inputs (or even as basic cruise control), depending on users’ comfort levels.

Styling: 8/10

The design of the sixth-gen Explorer is an inoffensive one, and the Limited trim on which the hybrid is based sticks with subtle bits of brightwork to accent its understated lines. However, the popularity of this SUV with police departments throughout the country means there’s a special place in hell for anyone who orders their Explorer in black, white, or grey like the tester seen here (unfortunately, of the nine paint choices, seven of them fall within that greyscale). There are, however, slick shades of blue or red that do away with the unmarked cruiser look.

Value: 7/10

As it only comes as a single trim, the Explorer Hybrid’s pricing structure is fairly straightforward: take the $50,799 Limited model, add $3,000 for the gas–electric powertrain, and the pre-tax price rings in at $55,799 with freight charges. There aren’t many options available aside from a pair of $450 paint jobs, a $600 towing package, and a $1,750 sunroof. This tester came equipped with the latter two, pushing the price to $58,149 before the government’s share.

While that asking price isn’t exactly out of line with the Toyota Highlander Hybrid Limited ($56,090 before tax) or the non-hybrid GMC Acadia Denali before options ($55,998 before tax), the Explorer Hybrid isn’t as efficient as the former nor as luxurious as the latter. It’s also not in keeping with the strategy Ford implemented with the smaller Escape Hybrid, which only comes as a single trim but undercuts a comparable Toyota RAV4 Hybrid by more than a few bucks.

The Verdict

But then the Highlander Hybrid can’t tow like the Explorer Hybrid – and neither can the Acadia, for that matter, which is rated to pull 1,814 kg (4,000 lb). And while the turbocharged four-cylinder this hybrid powertrain replaces is rated to tow slightly more, those with plans to move a trailer with any frequency would do well to move to something with a greater cylinder count. And since the Explorer’s available twin-turbo V6 is only offered in the more expensive ST and Platinum trims, this hybrid suddenly represents a sensible choice.

It might not be as miserly as what’s expected of most conventional hybrids, but this gas–electric Explorer is efficient by traditional three-row standards while featuring some of the finer qualities of both. Anyone intent on dipping their toes in the hybrid waters while keeping their feet firmly planted on the conventional ground of a V6-powered people-mover would do well to check out what the 2021 Ford Explorer Hybrid has to offer.

Sours: https://www.autotrader.ca/expert/20210219/2021-ford-explorer-hybrid-review-and-video/
2021 Ford Explorer Limited Hybrid Review + Drive - I was surprised!

Overview

If you're shopping for a new mid-size SUV for 2021, Ford is hoping that its Explorer will make its way to your driveway. It offers three rows of seats and plentiful room for hauling cargo, and it comes equipped with much of the connectivity and safety features that are on most buyers wish lists. The base and XLT models come standard with a turbocharged four-cylinder engine and rear-wheel drive, but all-wheel drive is optional. Optional is a hybrid powertrain, and the top-spec Platinum and sporty ST models come with a twin-turbo V-6. Overall, the Explorer is a decent choice, but rivals such as the Kia Telluride, the Hyundai Palisade, and the Mazda CX-9 offer more polish.

What's New for 2021?

Ford has made a few tweaks to its mid-size crossover for 2021, such as making heated seats standard on the XLT, offering a heated steering wheel as an optional feature on that model, and including an eight-way power-adjustable front passenger's seat on the Limited, ST, and Platinum models. A Sport Appearance package is now available on the XLT trim, and it includes 20-inch aluminum wheels that are coated in Carbonized Gray paint. In addition to the upgraded wheels, the package also brings a mesh grille with Carbonized Gray accents as well as unique lower-body cladding, dual exhaust outlets, Light Slate–colored interior upholstery, faux skid plates, and more. A new cargo organizer is optional on XLT, Limited, and ST models; the Platinum trim receives this feature as standard. A high-end King Ranch trim joins the lineup and features unique mahogany-colored leather upholstery; a sporty Enthusiast ST trim is also new for 2021 and provides the performance of the more expensive ST trim with less features and a lower price. Off-road enthusiasts may find the new Timberline trim interesting; it features a lifted suspension, all-terrain tires, and more rugged exterior styling cues. The hybrid powertrain is now available on the Platinum trim and, speaking of Platinum, buyers can now order a rear-wheel drive version of the Explorer's top trim. Ford also says an all-electric variant of the Explorer is on the way, but we don't expect to see that until at least the 2022 model year.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

We think the mid-level Limited model is the best Explorer for the money. While the hybrid makes sense for people who can take advantage of its lofty EPA-rated city mpg, we found the standard turbocharged four-cylinder engine to be sufficiently potent and more efficient on the highway. It can tow a sizeable 5300 pounds when equipped with the towing package. We'd also add all-wheel drive for $1920. Apart from that, we think the Limited trim's desirable standard features should suffice. These include a 12-speaker B&O audio system, 20-inch wheels, a heated and power-adjustable steering wheel, leather upholstery, a power-folding third row, and upgraded driver assists such as adaptive cruise control.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

Base, XLT, and Limited trims come with a 300-hp turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine, and it motivates the Explorer with authority. The lead-foot drivers among us will prefer either the Platinum model, with its 365-hp twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6, or the sporty Explorer ST, which uses a 400-hp version of the same engine. A hybrid joined the Explorer lineup for 2020. It pairs a 3.3-liter V-6 engine with an electric motor for a combined output of 318 horsepower. When properly equipped, the Explorer can tow up to 5600 pounds. The Explorer rides on an all-new rear-wheel-drive platform, but all-wheel drive is still optional. A 10-speed automatic transmission is standard across the board. Ride and handling are agreeable and composed but far from entertaining; the Explorer ST is far more athletic, and its extra power and stiffer suspension make it a real performance SUV.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Due to its myriad powertrain and drivetrain combinations, the 2021 Explorer has varying EPA fuel-economy ratings. The rear-drive hybrid model is rated as the thriftiest overall, with estimates of up to 27 mpg city and 29 mpg highway. Adding all-wheel drive reduces the hybrid's ratings by 3 and 4 mpg, respectively. We tested one on our 200-mile highway route, where it managed only 24 mpg. Comparatively, the 400-hp Explorer ST earned 25 mpg in our testing, which beat its EPA rating by 1. We also tested the four-cylinder Explorer with all-wheel drive. The government estimates that version will earn 20 mpg city and 27 highway; we saw 28 mpg.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

While the interior design may border on uninspired, the Explorer's cabin is functional and comfortable—at least for those in the first two rows. Getting into the standard third row is now easier thanks to a new mechanism that moves the second-row seat out of the way at the touch of a button. Once back there, however, older kids and adults will find that the seat is too close to the floor to be comfortable. Rivals such as the Chevy Traverse and the Volkswagen Atlas provide more comfort in the third row. We managed to fit four carry-on suitcases behind the Ford's third row, and we fit a total of 31 bags with both back rows folded flat.

Infotainment and Connectivity

An 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment is standard and includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capability and a Wi-Fi hotspot. The system is both attractive and responsive but not as intuitive as we'd like. A rotatory controller would help in that regard. To get the optional 10.1-inch vertically oriented screen, you'll need to upgrade to either the Platinum or ST. Still, every model is available with voice-activated navigation as well as a rear-seat entertainment system. Apart from the base Explorer, a 12-speaker B&O audio system comes standard.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The 2021 Explorer received a five-star safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) but missed out on a Top Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) due to a merely Acceptable score in the small-overlap front crash test. Ford outfits every Explorer with a host of standard driver-assistance technology and offers upgrades such as self-parking assist. Key safety features include:

  • Standard forward-collision warning and automated emergency braking
  • Standard blind-spot monitoring and rear-cross-traffic alert
  • Standard lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Ford provides wholly average limited and powertrain warranties that align with most competitors' plans. However, the company doesn't provide the complimentary maintenance that Toyota and Chevy do.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance

More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/ford/explorer

Mpg ford 2021 explorer hybrid

Ford

A well-known figure among three-row midsize SUVs, the Ford Explorer was completely redesigned for 2020, so don’t look for major changes in 2021. The base engine is a turbocharged 2.3-litre four-cylinder, while the other models benefit from a turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 producing 365 horsepower—or an even 400 in the sporty Explorer ST. And remember, there’s an Explorer Hybrid combining a 3.3-litre V6 with a 35-kilowatt electric motor.

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Ford Explorer

Pricing
MSRPCA$53,799
FeesCA$1,900
Gas guzzler taxCA$0
Monthly paymentsCA$1,012/month
Powertrain
Combined power318 hp @ 6,500 rpm
Combined torque322 lb·ft @ 3,000 rpm
Engine3,3 l V6
Power285 hp @ 6,500 rpm (213 kW)
Torque260 lb·ft @ 4,000 rpm (353 N·m)
InductionAtmospheric
Fuel typeRegular
EngineElectric
Power44 hp (33 kW)
TorqueN/A (N/A)
Transmission10-speed automatic
DrivetrainAWD
Hybrid / Electric
Battery typeLithium-ion (Li-ion)
EnergyN/A
VoltageN/A
Charging times
  • 120V: N/A
  • 240V: N/A
  • 400V: N/A
CoolingN/A
Drivetrain structureN/A
Vehicle type / Category
Vehicle typeSUV
CategoryHybrid / Plug-in Hybrid, Mid-size SUV
AssemblyChicago, IL, US
Generation6
Fuel efficiency / Autonomy
City10.1 L/100km
Highway9.0 L/100km
Combined9.6 L/100km
Autonomy708 km
Electric autonomyN/A
CO₂ emissions225 g/km
Equipment
Sunroofoptional
Heated front seatsstandard
Heated rear seatsstandard
Heated steering wheelstandard
Ventilated front seatsstandard
Surround-view camerastandard
Smart keystandard
Blindspot detectionstandard
Forward collision warningstandard
Autonomous emergency brakingstandard
Lane departure warningstandard
Adaptive cruise controlstandard
Remote engine startstandard
GPSstandard
Infotainment
Auxiliary audio inputstandard
Front USB portsstandard
Rear USB portsstandard
Apple CarPlay compatiblestandard
Android Auto compatiblestandard
Sirius XMstandard
Bluetooth audiostandard
Wi-Fi hotspotstandard
Wireless phone chargingstandard
Steering / Suspension / Brakes / Tires
Steeringrack and pinion with assist
Front suspensionindependent, Macpherson strut
Rear suspensionindependent, multi-link
Front brakesDisc (ABS)
Rear brakesDisc (ABS)
Front tiresP255/55R20
Rear tiresP255/55R20
Safety
Seat belts6
Dimensions / Weight
Length5,049 mm (199″)
Width2,004 mm (79″)
Height1,782 mm (70″)
Wheelbase3,025 mm (119″)
Weight2,254 kg (4,969 lb)
Capacities
Passengers6
Trunk515 l (18 cu ft)
Fuel tank68 l (15 gal)
Towing capacity2,268 kg (5,000 lb)
Performance
Power to weight ratio105.2 W/kg
0-100 km/h8.1 s (estimated)
80-120 km/h5.9 s (estimated)
Top speedN/A
Braking distance41 m
Warranty
Base warranty3 years/60,000 km
Powertrain warranty5 years/100,000 km
The Car Guide rating
Fuel economy6/10
Reliability5/10
Safety7/10
Infotainment8/10
Driving8/10
Overall7/10
Average 73%(view ratings)
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Ford Explorer Plug-in Hybrid 2020 test PL Pertyn Ględzi

2021 Ford Explorer


The 2021 Ford Explorer has a gas mileage of up to an EPA-estimated 21 city/28 highway MPG on gas-powered models. With the available hybrid trim level, the Explorer can reach an EPA-estimated 27 city/28 highway MPG.

Do you want to learn more about the Ford Explorer gas mileage? Then check out this in-depth look from the team at Andy Mohr Ford. When you’re ready to try it out for yourself in the Plainfield, Indianapolis, and Brownsburg, IN, area, give us a call and schedule a test drive!


Ford Explorer Gas Mileage by Engine

Your engine is the most important thing to consider when you’re looking at the gas mileage of the 2021 Ford Explorer. This large SUV gives you three gas-powered configurations to pick from, all of which deliver a different fuel economy, according to EPA estimates.

There’s an available hybrid powertrain, too, but we’ll look at that one in depth later. In the table below, we’re going to compare the MPG of the gas-powered engines:

Engine Option

Powertrain Specs

EPA-estimated 4-Wheel Drive (4WD) Gas Mileage

EPA-estimated Rear-Wheel Drive (RWD) Gas Mileage

2.3L EcoBoost® I-4

300 horsepower

310 lb-ft of torque

20 city/27 highway MPG

21 city/28 highway MPG

3.0L EcoBoost® V6

365 horsepower

380 lb-ft of torque

18 city/24 highway MPG

N/A

Enhanced 3.0L EcoBoost® V6

400 horsepower

415 lb-ft of torque

18 city/24 highway MPG

N/A

As you can see, the standard 2.3L EcoBoost® I-4 engine gets you the highest EPA-estimated fuel economy, all while delivering on that turbocharged EcoBoost® engine power.

If you want an even more energetic drive, you can also upgrade to either of the available V6 engines. These engines produce either 365 or 400 horsepower and each can get an EPA-estimated gas mileage of 18 city/24 highway MPG.

All three engines are paired with the efficient 10-speed automatic transmission.


2021 Explorer Limited Hybrid Trim Gas Mileage

Trim Gas Mileage

Now that you know what the fully gas-powered powertrains of the Ford Explorer can offer in terms of fuel economy, let’s look at the available Limited Hybrid trim level of the 2021 Explorer. You can learn more about this powertrain below:

  • 3.3L V6 Hybrid engine
  • 318 net system horsepower
  • 322 lb-ft of net system torque
  • EPA-estimated 27 city/28 highway MPG with RWD
  • EPA-estimated 23 city/26 highway MPG with 4WD

To give you an idea of how far these EPA-estimated MPG specs can take you, the hybrid Ford Explorer has a driving range of 500 miles on a single tank of gas.

This powertrain is also complemented by the smooth-shifting 10-speed automatic transmission that does all the heavy shifting for you.

The hybrid powertrain does such a good job of this, in fact, that this trim can tow up to 5,000 pounds when properly equipped.


Explore Ford Gas Mileage by Drivetrain

Mileage by Drivetrain

You may have noticed that there’s another factor at play here when it comes to the Ford Explorer gas mileage, and that’s drivetrain. The standard I-4 engine comes with RWD, which boosts your fuel economy to an EPA-estimated 21 city/28 highway MPG. That’s the maximum gas-powered MPG for the 2021 Explorer.

However, many Indy drivers like you prefer to equip their SUV with the available Intelligent 4WD system. This smart system actively monitors your roadway conditions and automatically adjusts torque distribution as necessary to improve traction control.

This 4WD system also includes Selectable Drive Modes, which can further optimize your traction control system. Choose among up to seven different modes, like:

  • Slippery
  • Trail
  • Eco
  • Deep Snow/Sand
  • Tow/Haul

If we’re having one of those Midwest snow storms, switch into Deep Snow/Sand mode, and your Explorer will adjust the transmission shift schedule, pedal response, and driveline configuration for better handling. If it’s a dry, sunny day, move into Eco mode to maximize efficiency and increase driving range.


Ford Explorer MPG by Trim Level

Finally, let’s talk about trim levels, because certain powertrain elements are only available on certain trims. You’ll get six different trim levels with the 2021 Explorer. Here’s how they line up with the four available powertrains.

Engine Option

Trim Levels

2.3L EcoBoost® I-4

Explorer, XLT, Limited

3.0L EcoBoost® V6

Platinum

Enhanced 3.0L EcoBoost® V6

ST

3.3L V6 Hybrid

Limited Hybrid

It’s clear that if you’re really looking to maximize on gas mileage with a fully gas-powered engine, then you’ll want to be sure to stick to the base-level Explorer trim or upgrade to the XLT or Limited trim levels. For maximum fuel efficiency, you can choose the available Limited Hybrid trim level.

Now, if pure off-road might or on-road excitement is your main goal, you can pump up the horsepower with either the Platinum or sporty ST trims.


Ford Explorer Gas Tank

Ford Explorer Gas Tank

Of course, at this point, you may be wondering just how much gas you can fill up with when you stop at the pump. This, again, is going to vary based on your trim level:

  • XLT/Limited: 17.9-gallon tank
  • St/Platinum: 20.2-gallon tank

While the 2.3L I-4 engine may have a higher overall fuel economy than the V6 engines, you may find that their different fuel tank capacities evens things out enough to have you going equally as far between fill-ups with either gas-powered powertrain.


Test Out the 2021 Ford Explorer Gas Mileage

Are you getting excited to test out the 2021 Ford Explorer gas mileage and see how far this SUV can take you around Brownsburg, Plainfield, and Indianapolis, Indiana? Then reach out to the team at Andy Mohr Ford!

We’ll talk with you about your fuel economy needs and pair you with the Explorer in the right trim level and with the right powertrain specs for your unique lifestyle. Contact us to schedule your test drive today!


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Similar news:

The Ford Explorer has been around for ages, but it finally got a hybrid powertrain for the 2020 model year. The Explorer Hybrid shares many similarities with the regular model, including roughly identical highway fuel economy estimates. An estimated 26 mpg is good for any three-row SUV, but it’s not really impressive on a pricier hybrid.

U.S. News recommends that you buy the 2021 Ford Escape Hybrid instead. It sits at the top of its Hybrid and Electric SUV rankings, while the Ford Explorer Hybrid took the eighth spot. Is the Ford Escape Hybrid really the best hybrid SUV Ford has to offer?

Is the Ford Explorer Hybrid a good SUV?

RELATED: How Many Miles Will a Ford Edge Last?

This hybrid is powered by a 3.3-liter V6 and one electric motor, producing a total of 318 hp. Electric-only power is really only employed when driving at very low speeds, and shifting from electric to gas isn’t very smooth. Still, it has enough power to keep its momentum at higher speeds, and the ten-speed transmission is a good match.

The 2021 Ford Explorer Hybrid’s biggest complaint stems from its subpar fuel economy. At best, it makes 23/26 mpg city/highway, a few points below the estimates for the 2020 model. Still, it’s better than the regular Ford Explorer with its rating of 21/28 mpg city/highway.

The interior is also a major disappointment, filled with hard plastics despite this SUV’s premium hybrid upcharge. There are some soft-touch materials to be found, but only on the door panels and dashboard. The first two rows provide roomy seating accommodations, but the third row can only seat small children comfortably.

The Ford Explorer Hybrid also comes with some fancy tech, but nothing impressive at its price point. It has a premium stereo system, a Wi-Fi hotspot, wireless device charging, and smartphone integration. Extra niceties like a panoramic moonroof and rear-seat entertainment system are also on offer.

How the Ford Escape Hybrid compares

The standard Ford Escape Hybrid comes with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and an electric motor that generate 200 hp combined. The Ford Escape PHEV’s powertrain makes 221 hp, but it’s not available with AWD. Both engines are paired with a surprisingly quiet CVT.

Regardless of drivetrain, the Ford Escape Hybrid feels quick on both city or highway roads and has a smooth ride. Both are also very efficient: the Escape Hybrid makes 40 mpg combined city/highway, while the PHEV makes 41 mpg. The Escape PHEV has an electric driving range of 37 miles.

Unfortunately, the Ford Escape Hybrid’s interior suffers from the same flaws as the Ford Explorer Hybrid’s. The mixed ratio of limited high-quality materials and overwhelming cheap ones make the interior design appear sloppy. On the plus side, five adult passengers can sit comfortably on the wide and supportive seats.

The Ford Escape Hybrid has many of the same infotainment offerings as the Ford Explorer Hybrid. It also has the same extensive collection of advanced driver’s aids, like lane-keeping assist, automatic emergency braking, and curve control. The SYNC 3 responds quickly to inputs and the menus are easy to navigate.

Why the Ford Explorer Hybrid can’t keep up with the Escape Hybrid

Obviously, the Ford Explorer Hybrid is more ideal for larger families since it has more seats. The Explorer Hybrid has more cargo space compared to the smaller Escape Hybrid, up to 88 cubic feet. It also has a higher towing capacity.

However, that’s essentially where its advantages over the Ford Escape Hybrid end. The Escape Hybrid gets much better mileage and makes better use of all its available seats. The Ford Explorer Hybrid is also costly at over $50,000, while the Ford Escape Hybrid retails for only $27,605.

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