Mini pc core i5

Mini pc core i5 DEFAULT

intel Logo Intel Intel NUC Mini PC Kit NUC8i5BEH Core i5, Tall version

Product Information

Motherboard

Processor

Processor

Intel Core iU GHz

Memory

Memory

Memory Not Included

Storage

Hard Drive

Hard Drive Not Included

SSD / NVMe

SSD Not Included

Computer Case

Liquid Cooling

Liquid Cooling Not Included

Drive Controllers

SATA Express

SATA 6Gbps x1

Communications

Wireless Technology

a
b
g
WiFi 4 (n)
WiFi 5 (ac)

Video

GPU Chipset

Intel Iris Plus Graphics

Multimedia Drives

Multimedia Drive

Not Included

Audio

Sound Output Mode

Channel Surround Sound

Ports & Connectors

Rear Ports

1 x RJ
1 x HDMI
2 x USB
1 x Thunderbolt 3

Front Ports

2 x USB
Card Reader
2 x USB

Power

Power Supply

19V AC Adapter

Warranty

What's in the Box

What's in the Box

Intel NUC8I5BEH Mini PC NUC Kit, Power Cable

Sours: https://www.microcenter.com/product//intel-nuc-mini-pc-kit-nuc8i5beh-core-i5,-tall-version

Ultracompact mini PC features Intel® Core™ processors, DDR4 RAM support, dual storage, 4K UHD video output, Windows 10, Wi-Fi, Thunderbolt 3 and USB Gen2 Type-C

  • Ultracompact size with liter volume for a clutter-free workspace
  • Powerful performance with 8th Gen Intel&#; Core&#; processors
  • Sliding-chassis design for easy, two-step storage and memory upgrades
  • Dual-storage design with an up to 1TB inch HDD and an up to GB M.2 SSD
  • Comprehensive I/O connectivity, including a Thunderbolt 3 configurable port* option that provides a high-speed, versatile connection for a dock, display or storage device.
  • ASUS Corporate Stable Model program ensures month stable-supply guarantee
  • 24/7 reliability &#; Extensively tested to ensure long-term dependability
* Configurable port options may vary by model or region.
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Easy modification, maximum possibilities

ASUS Mini PC PN61 is an ultracompact and lightweight mini PC ideal for a wide range of uses, including business and home entertainment. Mini PC PN61 blends easily into any environment yet delivers great performance with 8th Gen Intel® Core™ processors. Dual-display support and comprehensive I/O ports — including a front-mounted USB Gen2 Type-C port with Battery Charging support and a configurable port with a Thunderbolt 3 option* — provide ultrafast and versatile connectivity for docks, displays and storage devices. For even more flexibility, a sliding-chassis design enables easy storage and memory upgrades in just two steps.

*Configurable port options may vary by model or region

*Intel, the Intel Logo, Intel Inside, Intel Core, and Core Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.

A convenient sliding chassis design lets you add or upgrade a M.2 SSD, inch HDD or SSD, or memory in two easy steps using just a screwdriver. A bare-bones* option is also available, giving you maximum flexibility to customize your system.

* Bare-bones option availability may vary by model or region

ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- windows intel - 4k

ASUS Mini PC PN61 fits one Intel® Optane™ Memory or M.2 SSD, and a inch HDD, letting you create your own custom storage solution with the balance of speed and capacity to fit your needs.

Modern, space-saving design

With a modern design featuring sleek lines and a stylish, brushed finish, ASUS Mini PC PN61 easily blends into home, office and retail environments. Compact and lightweight at mm x mm x 49mm with a liter volume, it can be placed almost anywhere and even attached to the back of a display with a VESA mount for a space-saving, all-in-one solution.

  • Cooling vents

  • Modern, stylish design

  • VESA-mountable

ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- M.2 SSD-HDD -upgrade

Powerful performance for daily multitasking

ASUS Mini PC PN61 is powered by 8th Gen Intel® Core™ processors, which provide up to 18% better performance in daily multitask computing compared to previous-platform processors, ensuring smooth and responsive experiences in a wide variety of usage scenarios.

* Test tools: Cinebench R15| WebXPRT v| SYSMark
* Test configuration: PN61 with Intel®iU processor vs PN60 with Intel®iU processor

Faster and better DDR4 RAM

With DDR4 MHz memory that is X faster and 20% more energy efficient than DDR3 MHz memory, ASUS Mini PC PN61 provides excellent performance for daily computing tasks.

High-speed connectivity and legacy support

ASUS Mini PC PN61 provides comprehensive connectivity with multiple ports, including a front-mounted USB Gen2 Type-C port with Battery Charging support and a configurable port* that provides Thunderbolt 3 connectivity for ultrafast transfer speeds of up to 40Gbps or a variety of other connectivity options to support legacy devices, additional displays or multiple network connections.

* Configurable port options may vary by model or region

* Supports up to two displays at the same time via the USB Gen1 Type-C and configurable ports, or the USB Gen 1 Type-C and on-board HDMI ports.

ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- hdmi- USB serial port and ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC-ODD-Wirelss AntennaASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- hdmi- USB serial port and ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC-ODD-Wirelss Antenna

Stunning 4K UHD resolution and dual display support

ASUS Mini PC PN61 comes equipped with integrated Intel® UHD Graphics, so you can enjoy watching video and viewing images in stunning 4K UHD resolution. Support for dual displays lets you extend your workspace across multiple monitors for more efficient and comfortable productivity experiences.

  • 2

    Independent displays

  • 4K

    Display Resolution

  • 0

    Extra Graphic card needed

Reduce environmental impact while lowering operating costs

ASUS Mini PC PN61 has an energy-efficient design that reduces environmental impact while helping to lower operating costs for your business. Eco-friendly ASUS mini PCs are recipients of some of the industry's highest environmental certifications, including Energy Star. Mini PC PN61 consumes as little as W at idle. It is also whisper quiet, generating just dB of noise at idle and dB at full load.

ASUSPRO EBusiness mini PC- Energy Star -energy-efficient

* Test configuration: PN61 | Windows 10 Probit | Intel® iU Processor | DDR4 MHz 16Gx2 | ” 1TB HDD + M.2 G SSD PCIe

ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Corporate Stable Model- Longevity and Manageability

Longevity and manageability

ASUS Corporate Stable Model (CSM)

The ASUS Corporate Stable Model (CSM) program is an initiative designed to provide businesses with stable product supply and enhanced aftersales support. Each CSM mini PC purchase entitles the customer to the ASUS Control Center IT-management software suite (CSM Edition, a $60 value)* that provides comprehensive control and monitoring. ASUS CSM products also include a stable roadmap and assured month supply availability to ensure customers need not worry about material-supply gaps or extended supply.

Learn More

* Program offerings may vary by region. Please consult your local sales representative for more information.


AdvantagesCSM Mini PC Features
Server ManagementASUS Control Center
Stable supply36+ months product Lifecycle

*Starting from product launch date

6-month EOL notice
ECN control

*By request

Other supportWindows 10 and Pre-WHQL Ready

ASUS mini PCs undergo rigorous noise, vibration, drop, and thermal shock tests to ensure they meet exacting ASUS standards and exceed industry requirements. Be confident that your ASUS mini PC can cope with extreme conditions, ranging from dry °C temperatures, to humid and hot environments exceeding 60°C for long periods of time.

  • ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Reliability

    Vibration Test

  • ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Reliability

    Drop Test

  • ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Reliability

    Port Test

  • ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Reliability

    Temperature and Humidity Test

  • ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Reliability

    Noise Test

  • ASUSPRO PNBusiness mini PC- Reliability

    Line Voltage and Frequency Test

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Sours: https://www.asus.com/Displays-Desktops/Mini-PCs/All-series/Mini-PC-PN61/
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Free shipping is one-way unless otherwise authorized to return under policy conditions. Minimum $25 purchase to qualify for free standard ground shipping. And all orders are not delivered on Sundays or holidays.

Orders are processed Monday-Friday (excluding holidays). Orders placed after the cutoff time ( P.M PST) are processed and shipped the next business day.

Free Shipping is only for lower states customers, excluding Alaska, Hawaii, US Permanently-inhabited Territories and Protectorates. International shipping is not available at this time.

For all orders $ or more via FedEx, a delivery signature is required for receipt of the product and we can only deliver to the address that you have provided on your order. If signature is required, please make sure someone will be available to sign for your package. FedEx will make a maximum of 3 delivery attempts to the address on your order. After 3 delivery attempts, you can contact regarding the address of the FedEx Ground Station. If the item is not picked up within a certain time, they will ship the item back to us.

For more completed information, please see our Shipping Policy

Sours: https://us-store.msi.com/
ACEPC CK2 MINI PC - WIN 10 Pro - Core i5 7200U - 8GB - 128GB SSD - Any Good?
  • The Asus PN50 is our “bare-bones” mini PC pick for people who don’t mind buying and installing their own memory, storage, and operating system. We’ve also added information about the ongoing chip shortage.

June 7,

If you want a desktop PC rather than a laptop for working or learning at home, if you don’t plan to play high-end games, and if you want to choose your own monitors and other accessories, consider a mini PC rather than a full-size desktop computer or an inflexible all-in-one. Mini PCs are fast enough for anything other than high-end gaming, and unlike some laptops, they include all the ports you need to connect multiple monitors and your favorite keyboard and mouse.

Normally, we’d recommend Lenovo’s ThinkCentre M70q Tiny, and if you can get it for $ or less, we still think it’s the best one you can buy. But the ongoing silicon chip shortage has created months-long shipping delays for the M70q and many other mini PCs. For as long as this situation lasts, the best mini PC is the one you can actually buy right now, so check our list of other good mini PCs if you need something now and can’t afford to wait.

Processor:Six-core Intel Core iTStorage: GB NVMe SSD
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:

One USB Type-AOne USB Type-C

Headphones

Line-in

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Four USB Type-AOne DisplayPort

One HDMI

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slotsOne NVMe M.2 slot

M.2 Wi-Fi card

Optional inch SATA drive bay

Lenovo sells several ThinkCentre mini PCs with the same basic design, including the M80q Tiny and M90q Tiny, but the M70q Tiny offers the best combination of price and features. The front panel has one USB Type-C port for newer accessories as well as a Type-A port for older cables and USB drives. On the back, it has one DisplayPort and one HDMI port so you can easily use multiple monitors (if you order a custom configuration, you can add more USB-C, DisplayPort, or HDMI ports). Its fan is nearly silent in everyday use and tolerable under more intensive workloads. And for easy upgrades later on, you need to remove only one screw to access its M.2 storage and two memory slots.

Processor:Six-core Intel Core iTStorage: GB NVMe SSD
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:

Two USB Type-A (one 10 Gbps, one 5 Gbps)

One USB Type-C

Headphones

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Four USB Type-A

One DisplayPort

One HDMI

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slots

One NVMe M.2 slot

M.2 Wi-Fi card

Optional inch SATA drive bay

If the ThinkCentre M70q Tiny is out of stock or our recommended configuration costs more than $, or if you just want an extra front USB port, get the HP ProDesk G6 Mini PC instead. It’s normally more expensive than the M70q, but it’s just as fast. If you order a customizable model, you can add an additional DisplayPort, HDMI port, USB-C port, or VGA port to the back, a inch drive bay for another hard drive or SSD, and an extra pair of USB ports to connect more accessories. The customizable model also includes a generous three-year warranty by default.

Processor:Dual-core Intel Celeron UStorage:64 GB eMMC
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:

Two USB Type-AmicroSD card reader

Headphones

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth
Rear ports:

One USB Type-AOne USB Type-A

One USB Type-C

Two HDMI

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slotsOne NVMe M.2 slot

M.2 Wi-Fi card

Thanks to Google’s Chrome OS, the CTL Chromebox CBX2 is faster than a similarly priced, $ Windows PC at browsing the web, handling basic word processing, and playing movies. But unlike a Windows or Mac computer, a Chrome OS device (mostly) can’t use desktop apps. In fact, the app you use for almost everything on a Chrome OS device is the Chrome web browser, and your device has to be connected to the internet for most tasks. The CTL Chromebox CBX2 includes twice as much memory as other similarly priced budget Chromeboxes we considered, and it has plenty of ports. A somewhat cheaper version with 4 GB of memory is available (and you can upgrade the memory later, if you want), but we think most people are likely to be happier with the extra speed and responsiveness that 8 GB of memory offers.

Also great

Asus PN50

Asus PN50

For DIY-ers

A “bare-bones” mini PC includes just the motherboard and processor in a box—you need to supply your own memory, storage, and operating system. We like the PN50’s speedy AMD Ryzen processors and good port selection, which includes USB-C and a microSD card slot.

Processor:Six-core Ryzen 5 UStorage:N/A
Memory:N/ASize: by by inches
Front ports:

Headphones

One USB Type-C

One USB Type-A

microSD card slot

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Two USB Type-A

One USB Type-C

One HDMI

One DisplayPort

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slots

One NVMe M.2 slot

One inch SATA drive bay

A “bare-bones” mini PC comes without memory, storage, or an operating system, so it’s not ready to use out of the box. But if you’re comfortable installing these things yourself, it’s often more economical to buy a bare-bones system, especially if you need a large SSD, for storing big video files or games, or 16 GB of memory, for editing high-resolution photos and videos. We like the Asus PN50 bare-bones mini PC because its AMD Ryzen processors offer good enough performance for everything from web browsing to light gaming, and because the PN50 squeezes in all of the ports most people will need (including a microSD card slot on the front).

Processor:Eight-core Apple M1 CPUStorage: GB proprietary SSD
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:NoneWireless:Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Two Thunderbolt4, Two USB Type-A

One HDMI

Headphones

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:None

If you prefer macOS, get the Mac mini with Apple’s M1 processor. The Mac mini is one of Apple’s first computers to stop using Intel chips, and the result is a surprisingly fast and energy-efficient mini desktop with enough processor power to edit video and compile code, as well as sufficient graphics performance to keep a pair of 4K monitors feeling fast and fluid (we can emphatically say this was not true of Mac minis with Intel’s integrated graphics). For everyday browsing and general use, an M1 Mac mini with 8 GB of memory is good enough, though if you plan to use yours for professional photo and video editing or app development, you should step up to 16 GB of memory; you can’t upgrade the Mac mini’s memory and storage after you buy it, so you need to make that decision up-front. But the new Mac mini has fewer ports than the Intel-based model it replaces, and none of those ports are accessible from the front. The Mac mini is also quite a bit larger than most of the Windows mini PCs we tested, and Apple’s internal storage upgrades are pricey enough that you should look at an external hard drive or a portable SSD if you need more space.

Everything we recommend

Also great

Asus PN50

Asus PN50

For DIY-ers

A “bare-bones” mini PC includes just the motherboard and processor in a box—you need to supply your own memory, storage, and operating system. We like the PN50’s speedy AMD Ryzen processors and good port selection, which includes USB-C and a microSD card slot.

Why you should trust us

Andrew Cunningham has been testing, reviewing, and otherwise writing about PCs, Macs, and other gadgets for AnandTech, Ars Technica, and Wirecutter since He has been building, upgrading, and fixing PCs for more than 15 years, and he spent five of those years in IT departments buying and repairing laptops and desktops as well as helping people buy the best tech for their needs. He has also been a fan of mini PCs for as long as they’ve been a thing.

Who this is for

Mini PCs cram the power of a Windows ultrabook into a computer the size of a paperback beach read, which means they’re more than powerful enough for browsing the web, handling basic photo and video editing, and working in documents or large spreadsheets. But unlike ultrabooks or most all-in-ones, mini PCs are easy to upgrade if you want to add more memory or storage, and they have all the ports you need to connect two or three monitors and your favorite keyboard, mouse, and webcam.

Aside from the Mac mini, any of our picks allow you to upgrade the RAM if you decide you need more.

The size of a mini PC prevents much expansion, but you can upgrade the storage and the memory on most models, and sometimes the CPU. Instead of a dedicated graphics card, you’re usually stuck with integrated graphics, so don’t expect a mini PC to have enough power to play many modern games. The mini PCs we recommend in this guide can’t handle gaming beyond simple titles such as Minecraft or Hearthstone. You can add an external graphics dock if a mini PC supports Thunderbolt 3, but such docks tend to be large and expensive.

Mini PCs are available for less than $, but Windows PCs in that price range have unusably slow processors and less memory and storage than most people need. At the lowest budgets, we preferred Chromeboxes, which run Chrome OS, an operating system that uses the Chrome web browser as its primary interface. If you spend your computing time in a browser—checking email, using Google’s productivity suite, watching Netflix, reading social media—Chrome OS is all you need. But a Chromebox isn’t for everyone. Chrome has notably limited options for photo, video, and audio editing software, as well as for text editors used in programming. Although Chromeboxes can run Android apps and offer “experimental” support for some Linux apps, that software can’t close the app gap between Windows/macOS and Chrome OS. Popular suites and programs such as Office and Adobe Lightroom do have web-based or Android versions, but if you need specialized software for work or school, you’re better off with Windows or macOS.

The mini PCs we recommend in this guide can’t handle gaming beyond simple titles such as Minecraft or Hearthstone.

If you’re willing to install a few parts and an operating system yourself, consider a bare-bones mini PC. These models come with only a CPU, a motherboard, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support, and USB ports; it’s up to you to provide the storage, the RAM, and an operating system. Most companies charge a premium for RAM and SSD upgrades, so buying those components yourself can save money, and the resulting systems work just as well as any mini PC you can buy off the shelf.

We did not look at cheap, single-board computers, such as those from Raspberry Pi or the discontinued CHIP series, nor would we include them in our definition of the term “mini PC.” These ARM-based computers are slow, geared toward hobbyists, and designed to use custom Linux software.

How we picked

Our three favorite mini desktop PC from CTL, Lenovo, and Apple, shown in a stack.

We started by researching more than 60 models of mini PCs, noting their features and specifications. Here’s what we look for in a good mini PC:

  • Specs:
    • Processor: A mini PC needs a processor powerful enough to handle basic web browsing, light photo editing, and any office programs you use. With the exception of our budget contenders and the Mac mini, all the mini PCs in our test group have a 10th- or 11th-generation Intel Core i5 processor or a series AMD Ryzen processor.
    • Memory: We recommend at least 8 GB of RAM for browsing the web and handling basic productivity tasks. If you spend lots of time in heavy-duty apps such as Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom, or Premiere, or if you regularly edit several large spreadsheets or databases at a time, you may benefit from 16 GB; aside from the Mac mini, any of our picks allow you to upgrade the RAM if you decide you need more. We’re lenient on this component for budget models, which typically cap out at 4 GB of RAM, but you can often upgrade that to 8 GB or even 16 GB for $80 or less if you do it yourself.
    • Storage: A spinning hard drive can bog down an otherwise speedy computer, so a solid-state drive is a requirement here. A GB SSD should be available as a standard feature, and upgrading the storage or adding a second drive later should be easy. Budget picks usually come with less storage, but Chrome OS relies more on cloud storage than Windows and macOS do, so local storage isn’t as big a deal for a Chromebox.
    • Wireless features: Every mini PC should come with support for Wi-Fi 5 or Wi-Fi 6 (also called ac and ax) wireless networking and for Bluetooth so you don’t have to waste USB ports by adding dongles for Wi-Fi or your wireless keyboards and mice.
  • Price: Mini PCs are smaller than desktop PCs, but their size doesn’t make them cheaper—on the contrary, cramming everything into a small box is an engineering feat you pay a small premium for. Expect to pay between $ and $ for a mini PC capable enough to last you the next few years.
  • Ports: A good mini PC comes with at least four USB ports. A great mini PC tosses in a USB Type-C and/or Thunderbolt port and an SD card reader. The ports should be split between the PC’s front and back so that you can access at least a couple of them without messing around at the back of the computer. A mini PC should have at least two ports for connecting to monitors—any combination of HDMI, DisplayPort, and USB-C is workable for most people.
  • Preinstalled operating system: For our main pick, we focused on PCs running Windows Our Mac pick comes with macOS; our budget pick comes with Chrome OS.
  • Size: A mini PC should have a footprint no larger than 8 by 8 inches and should be no more than 3 inches tall. (Any larger, and you might as well get a Mini-ITX computer, which has more room for expansion.) Because mini PCs fit almost anywhere, many clever mounting options are available. If a mini PC model has a VESA mount (more on this below), you can hide the PC behind a monitor or underneath a desk.
  • Ease of upgrades: You should be able to upgrade the memory and storage on any mini PC without much technical know-how.
  • Fan noise: Like laptops, mini PCs cram a lot of power into a small case. Although you don’t need to worry about burning your legs with a mini PC, you do need to make sure the case regulates temperature so that it doesn’t overheat. Due to the system’s size, you might hear the fan kick on more often than with other computers, so it’s important that the fan’s sound isn’t too annoying.
  • Warranty: Most mini PCs come with at least a one-year warranty, but the best have a two- or three-year warranty. The policy should cover any defects as well as tech support over the phone, chat, or email.

We considered the following features, but their presence didn’t change our recommendations:

  • Lack of bloatware: Nobody wants useless, poorly designed, complicated software—bloatware—preinstalled on their PC, and it’s annoying for people who can’t figure out how to remove it. A mini PC free of manufacturer cruft is more desirable.
  • Bundled keyboard and mouse: Some of the mini PCs we’ve looked at come with keyboards and mice, while others don’t. This doesn’t affect our judgment one way or the other. The accessories that PC manufacturers bundle with their desktops are rarely very good—if you care about your keyboard and mouse, you're likely to spend extra on a nice Bluetooth keyboard or mechanical keyboard and a good wireless mouse anyway.
  • VESA mounting support: Mounting a mini PC to the back of a monitor is a good way to save a little space on your desk and get some of the benefits of an all-in-one without having to pay for one (or dealing with its lack of upgradability). VESA support on a mini PC is nice to have but not something everyone needs.
  • Power consumption: Mini PCs use low-power desktop and laptop processors, so yours shouldn’t draw much power even when it’s working hard.

After we settled on the hardware criteria, we searched the websites of major PC manufacturers such as Acer, Apple, Asus, Dell, HP, Intel, and Lenovo—and poked around in the inventory of smaller manufacturers such as Gigabyte, MSI, Shuttle, and Zotac—to find models to test.

How we tested

We started our tests by booting up each mini PC and then running Windows Update and each manufacturer’s driver-update program (if included). We then ran the benchmarking program Geekbench 5 and transcoded a minute p video using HandBrake—this process gave us a good idea of how the PCs would perform in general use and when running at full speed for an extended period of time. We listened to the fan’s volume during these tests and tracked the power consumption of each mini PC with a Kill A Watt EZ monitor while the computer was idle on the Windows desktop and while it ran the CPU- and GPU-intensive benchmarks.

We then connected each mini PC to a dual-monitor setup (one 4K, one p) and used it for a few days of ordinary work. This process usually consisted of running a web browser with at least 15 tabs open at a time (Google Docs, Sheets, Gmail, Slack, and plenty more), streaming music through the Spotify desktop application, video chatting, and recording audio. The testing allowed us to get a feel for how each mini PC performed on a daily basis, and it also gave us time to discover any quirks related to bloatware or driver issues. On each machine we tried to load up a few games. On every PC in this guide, games such as Fortnite, Hearthstone, League of Legends, Minecraft, and Rocket League are playable at medium or low settings, but more demanding games (even older ones like Far Cry 5 or Middle-earth: Shadow of War) will run poorly, even on lower settings.

Our pick: Lenovo ThinkCentre M70q Tiny

The Lenovo ThinkCentre M70q Tiny, shown with a monitor and keyboard.
Processor:Six-core Intel Core iTStorage: GB NVMe SSD
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:

One USB Type-AOne USB Type-C

Headphones

Line-in

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Four USB Type-AOne DisplayPort

One HDMI

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slotsOne NVMe M.2 slot

M.2 Wi-Fi card

Optional inch SATA drive bay

Lenovo’s ThinkCentre M70q Tiny is small and quiet, and it looks nice on a desk. It also performs well and has plenty of ports—everything you need from a mini PC. The configuration we recommend, with a six-core Intel processor, 8 GB of memory, and GB of solid-state storage, usually costs around $ and will feel plenty fast on anything other than high-end games. On top of that, it has an array of ports for USB accessories and monitors, and it’s easy to open and upgrade.

The processor in the M70q Tiny (in our recommended configuration, a six-core Intel Core iT) is more than fast enough for everyday tasks such as browsing, simple photo and video editing, and working on Google Docs and Microsoft Office documents. It’s also a decent option for professional photo and video editing, though if you plan to use this system for professional Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom, or Premiere work, consider upgrading to 16 GB of memory and buying a bigger SSD. You can buy those components from Lenovo, or you can install them yourself if you’re comfortable with that and want to save some money.

The ports on the Lenovo ThinkCentre M70q Tiny.

The M70q Tiny has a good selection of ports, so you’re less likely to require hubs or converters as your needs change. It has one USB Type-A port and one USB Type-C port on the front, along with a combination headphone and line-in jack; on the back, it offers four USB Type-A ports, one Gigabit Ethernet port, one DisplayPort connection, and one HDMI port. On the built-to-order version of the M70q Tiny, you can add more ports, including HDMI, DisplayPort, VGA, or USB-C.

Lenovo has made all of its ThinkCentre mini PC models easy to upgrade (though Dell OptiPlex Micro models, HP ProDesk and EliteDesk desktops, and Intel NUC units are all pretty simple to open up, too). Remove a single large screw on the back of the M70q Tiny, and you can lift the top of the system to access its Wi-Fi/Bluetooth card and its inch drive bay (if you order the system with a inch hard drive or SSD; if you order it without a inch drive installed, Lenovo doesn’t include the special bracket or cable you need to install one). A second plate on the bottom slides off to expose its M.2 storage slot and two memory slots.

A side view of the M70q, our pick for best mini PC.

The volume of the fan in the M70q Tiny is audible but not distracting during normal day-to-day use, and you likely wouldn’t hear it over quiet music or the ambient noise in a small office. It kicks into higher gear when you’re playing a game, encoding a video, or performing other resource-intensive tasks for more than a few minutes at a time, but the low-pitched whooshing is far preferable to the loud whine of the small fans in some other mini PCs. And we found that its power consumption was similar to that of other Windows mini PCs we tested: around 8 watts when idling at the desktop and hitting a peak of 60 watts when encoding video.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

Some of the mini PCs we’ve tested include space for a second storage drive, either as another M.2 slot that accepts an SSD or as a built-in inch drive bay—and some models include both. The M70q Tiny’s single M.2 slot feels stingy by comparison, and you get a inch drive bracket and cable only if you have one installed when you order the computer.

Another good option: HP ProDesk G6

A close-up view of the front of the HP ProDesk G6.
Processor:Six-core Intel Core iTStorage: GB NVMe SSD
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:

Two USB Type-A (one 10 Gbps, one 5 Gbps)

One USB Type-C

Headphones

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Four USB Type-A

One DisplayPort

One HDMI

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slots

One NVMe M.2 slot

M.2 Wi-Fi card

Optional inch SATA drive bay

If the ThinkCentre M70q is out of stock or it costs more than $, or if you want another front USB port and more internal storage, get the HP ProDesk G6 Mini PC instead. It uses the same 10th-generation Intel Core processors as the M70q, so it’s about as fast. And both computers take up about the same amount of space on a desk and will fit the same amount of internal storage. The ProDesk is usually more expensive than a similarly configured M70q Tiny, but ongoing silicon chip shortages make pricing and availability hard to predict; you should buy whichever one is the better deal.

The six-core Intel Core i5 processor in the ProDesk G6 is good for schoolwork and work-work, along with video chatting and basic photo and video editing. If you plan to use this for Photoshop or other professional apps, consider upgrading to 16 GB of memory or buying a bigger SSD—both upgrades you can do yourself if you want to save money. Intel’s integrated graphics won’t play many games, but that’s true of most of the mini PCs we looked at.

A close-up of the back of the Hp ProDesk G6.

Aside from its extra front USB Type-A port, the ProDesk ’s back panel has the same port selection as the M70q Tiny, including one HDMI port, one DisplayPort, four USB Type-A ports, and a gigabit Ethernet port. The build-to-order version of the system can be configured with additional USB ports, as well as an extra HDMI port, DisplayPort, VGA port, or USB-C port.

Like most of the other mini PCs we’ve tested, the ProDesk is simple to open and upgrade—remove a single thumbscrew on the back and slide off the top cover to expose the M.2 storage slot and the optional inch drive bay, and lift the fan to access its two memory slots. HP will add the inch drive bay and cable for $9 if you want to add your own drive without paying HP’s prices. (HP will sell you a 1 TB hard drive for $; you can buy one yourself for less than $)

HP’s ProDesk and EliteDesk mini PC models are cooled by a single fan that is barely audible during normal day-to-day use (we haven’t tested the ProDesk G6 specifically, but we’ve tested several other ProDesk and EliteDesk and models that use an identical design); it spins up audibly only when you’re playing a game, encoding a video, or performing other resource-intensive tasks for more than a few minutes at a time. Power consumption will depend a bit on the processor you choose, but mini PCs we’ve tested with 10th-generation Core i5 processors usually consume around 7 or 8 watts of power when idle and between 50 and 60 watts of power when encoding video.

Budget pick: CTL Chromebox CBX2

The CTL Chromebox CBX2 shown with a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.
Processor:Dual-core Intel Celeron UStorage:64 GB eMMC
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:

Two USB Type-AmicroSD card reader

Headphones

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth
Rear ports:

One USB Type-AOne USB Type-A

One USB Type-C

Two HDMI

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slotsOne NVMe M.2 slot

M.2 Wi-Fi card

If you want to spend less than $ on a mini PC, you’re better off getting one that runs Google’s Chrome OS instead of Windows. Chrome OS simply runs better on low-end processors and less memory, and because Chrome OS relies primarily on cloud storage, a tiny SSD for storage isn’t a problem, either. The CTL Chromebox CBX2 is our favorite cheap mini PC because it’s fast enough for basic work, it has plenty of ports, and it provides a good amount of memory and storage for the price.

Chrome OS has limitations, which we explore more fully in our guide to Chromebooks. Chromebooks and Chromeboxes are good computers if you spend most of your time browsing the internet, watching YouTube videos, visiting social networks, and working in web apps like Google Drive or the online versions of Microsoft’s Office apps. They’re also simpler to use than Windows PCs, they don’t include bloatware, and updates install quickly and silently in the background. But they can’t run full desktop versions of apps like Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Office. And although Chrome OS can run the Android versions of those apps from the Google Play store, those versions are not as full-featured as their desktop counterparts and are sometimes awkward to use with a keyboard and mouse. Chrome OS does offer experimental support for Linux apps, but their performance isn’t great, and many of the complex high-quality desktop apps missing from Chrome OS are also missing from Linux anyway.

The CBX2’s processor is fast enough for day-to-day tasks, but in our side-by-side comparisons the dual-core Intel Celeron processor was considerably slower than the four- and six-core processors we recommend in our other picks. The kinds of tasks where you’re likely to notice a slow processor the most—editing photos and video or playing games—are things that Chrome OS isn’t good at anyway. If you do need more storage or memory, the CBX2 we recommend has an open NVMe SSD slot (we have a guide to the best SSDs that you can install) and one open RAM slot.

The CTL Chromebox CBX2, our budget pick for best mini PC.

The CBX2 also offers a surprisingly good selection of ports. On the front, you get a headphone jack, two USB Type-A ports, and a microSD card reader; on the back, you get one more USB Type-A port, one USB Type-A port, two HDMI ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, a USB-C port, and a power jack. CTL includes a power brick that most people will use to power the CBX2, but if you happen to own a third-party USB-C charger or a USB-C monitor that can provide around 65 W of power, you can plug the CBX2 in that way, too.2

Although its boxy, black plastic exterior isn’t eye-catching, the Chromebox’s utilitarian design should be good enough for anyone who just wants a computer that works. Fan noise isn’t a problem—even under heavy load, the processor isn’t fast enough to generate tons of heat—and the computer is easy enough to open and upgrade. First, you peel back the edges of the grippy rubber strips on the bottom to expose four Phillips-head screws. Then, you pop the plastic bottom off, remove another four screws from the computer’s VESA-mounting bracket, and lift that out to expose both RAM slots and the open M.2 SSD slot.

CTL provides a one-year warranty for the Chromebox CBX2 by default, but like many PC makers, CTL will sell you a two- or three-year warranty for an extra fee.

Also great for DIYers: Asus PN50

A photo of the front of the Asus PN50 mini PC, shown on a desk beside a monitor, mouse and keyboard.

Also great

Asus PN50

Asus PN50

For DIY-ers

A “bare-bones” mini PC includes just the motherboard and processor in a box—you need to supply your own memory, storage, and operating system. We like the PN50’s speedy AMD Ryzen processors and good port selection, which includes USB-C and a microSD card slot.

Processor:Six-core Ryzen 5 UStorage:N/A
Memory:N/ASize: by by inches
Front ports:

Headphones

One USB Type-C

One USB Type-A

microSD card slot

Wireless:Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Two USB Type-A

One USB Type-C

One HDMI

One DisplayPort

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:

Two DDR4 RAM slots

One NVMe M.2 slot

One inch SATA drive bay

The Asus PN50 doesn’t include memory, storage, or an operating system, so it requires additional setup our other picks don’t. But if you’re comfortable installing those things yourself, a “bare-bones” mini PC can actually be more economical than one of our pre-built picks. Adding a GB SSD, 8 GB of memory, and Windows 10 to the PN50 costs between $ and $, depending on the parts you choose and how you acquire your Windows license. And the pricing, compared with that of our other picks, gets even better if you want more storage or memory—buying these parts yourself is always cheaper than paying Lenovo, HP, or Dell for the same upgrades.

The PN50’s performance is as good or better than the ThinkCentre M70q because of its AMD Ryzen processors, which offer enough processing power for photo and video editing and enough graphics performance to play the occasional PC game.3 We think the Ryzen 5 version of the PN50 offers the best combination of price and performance. But you can find a Ryzen 3 version for a bit less money that will still work well for schoolwork, working from home, or basic browsing. And you can find a more expensive Ryzen 7 version with a bit more power for editing high-resolution video or running other professional apps.

The computer’s port selection is also excellent, with plenty of USB ports on the front and back and enough display outputs to support up to three monitors. It also has USB Type-C ports on the front and the back (whereas most of our picks have one or the other) and a microSD card slot, which is handy for photographers or others who use microSD cards regularly.

The back of the Asus PN50, which shows the available ports.

Compared with most of our other picks, the PN50 is taller but has a smaller, byinch footprint, which makes it look a bit chunky. That additional height leaves room for a inch drive bay, so you can install a spinning hard drive or extra SATA SSD for storage (though we recommend installing Windows on the internal NVMe SSD to maximize speed). Because the first thing you need to do to a bare-bones mini PC is open it up to install components, Asus has made the PN50 easy to get into; remove four Phillips head screws from the bottom of the device, and then slide the bottom off to expose both memory slots and the M.2 SSD slot. The bottom of the PN50 also doubles as the tray where you install the inch drive, if you’re using one.

Fan noise in the PN50 is more or less comparable to that of the other mini PCs we tested. The system’s single fan is essentially inaudible in a room with ambient noise like a ceiling fan or quiet music playing, but it spins up to a more noticeable whine when gaming or performing other tasks that stress the processor for more than a few minutes at a time.

Also great: Apple Mac mini (M1, )

An M1 Apple Mac mini, shown with a monitor and keyboard.
Processor:Eight-core Apple M1 CPUStorage: GB proprietary SSD
Memory:8 GBSize: by by inches
Front ports:NoneWireless:Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth
Rear ports:

Two Thunderbolt 4Two USB Type-A

One HDMI

Headphones

Gigabit Ethernet

Expansion:None

If you prefer macOS to Windows or Chrome OS, Apple’s Mac mini (the model with Apple’s M1 processor, not the model with any of several Intel processors) is the mini PC you should get. Apple’s M1 processor is about as fast as the speediest Intel processors in older Mac minis, and its power efficiency means that the Mac mini remains whisper-quiet even when the computer is working hard. The M1 Mac mini does have fewer ports than Intel Mac minis, all of those ports are on the back of the computer, and it can connect to only two monitors instead of three. Some apps, such as most Adobe software and a wide range of STEM software and other utilities, still haven’t been optimized for Apple’s chips, and you can’t run Windows using Boot Camp or virtualization software such as Parallels Desktop.

A top-down photo comparing the Asus PN50 and the Apple Mac Mini side by side.

The Mac mini’s M1 processor makes it about as fast as a inch MacBook Pro, so it’s great for everyday tasks such as web browsing, document and spreadsheet work, and casual photo editing yet still usable in a pinch for professional tasks like app development and video editing. If you mainly plan to use it as a day-to-day computer, the basic $ version with 8 GB of memory works just fine. If you want to run professional apps, getting 16 GB of memory is worth paying an extra $, since you can’t upgrade the M1 Mac mini yourself after buying it. Apple’s storage upgrades are similarly expensive, so we recommend buying an external hard drive or a portable SSD rather than paying Apple’s prices.

Despite its larger size, the Mac mini actually comes with fewer ports than most of the Windows mini PCs we tested (and fewer than the old Intel Mac mini had). You get one Gigabit Ethernet port, a pair of Thunderbolt/USB-C 4 ports, an HDMI port, and two Type-A USB Gen 2 ports. You can use the Thunderbolt and HDMI ports in any combination to connect up to two external monitors, which is fewer than the three or four external monitors that Intel’s graphics support. But when you’re using a pair of high-resolution 4K-and-up monitors with the M1 Mac mini, macOS and its apps remain fluid and responsive, without any of the choppiness you could sometimes see if you hooked the same pair of monitors to an Intel Mac mini.

Apple’s storage upgrades are expensive, so we recommend buying an external hard drive or a portable SSD rather than paying Apple’s prices.

The Mac mini is one of the larger mini PCs we tested, at by inches and inches high. It also lacks VESA-mounting options, so it needs room on a desk unless you want to try a third-party mount. But unlike the Windows PCs we tested, the Mac mini doesn’t have an external power brick, so you don’t need to find room for one behind or under your desk.

The ports on the the M1 Apple Mac mini.

One area where the Mac mini excels compared with any of our other picks is fan noise: The Apple M1 version is barely audible even when you’re playing a game or encoding video files. Apple’s chips, originally designed to fit into small, fanless iPhones and iPads, are more efficient than Intel’s, which means they generate less heat and use less power. In laptops like the MacBook Air, that manifests as a few extra hours of battery life. In a desktop computer, it means that the system doesn’t need a loud fan, and your power bills will be a little lower. Most of the Intel systems in our tests consumed between 50 W and 60 W of power when encoding a video, a task that stresses all the cores on a processor at once. The M1 Mac mini, in contrast, used about 24 W of power to do the same task in a similar amount of time.

The Mac mini comes with Apple’s standard one-year warranty. Extending that coverage to three years with AppleCare+ costs $99; doing so also adds accidental-damage protection and three years of “priority access to tech support.”

Other good mini PCs

The HP ProDesk G6 shares the ProDesk G6’s design and port layout but uses AMD Ryzen processors instead of Intel Core processors. The version with a Ryzen 5 Pro GE should offer about the same processor performance as an Intel Core i5–based mini PC but much faster integrated-graphics performance, which is better for Fortnite and other less-demanding and older games. But like many AMD Ryzen systems, the ProDesk G6 is frequently out of stock, which might be a problem if you can’t afford to wait. Also make sure not to buy the version based on the Ryzen 5 Pro GE or GE, both of which are a generation older and don’t perform as well.

What about Intel NUCs?

A photo of the Intel NUC from the front, shown on a desk alongside a monitor, mouse, and keyboard.

For as long as we’ve published this guide, we’ve recommended some iteration of Intel’s NUC mini PC (that’s “Next Unit of Computing,” if you’re wondering about the weird name). These systems, which come both as preconfigured PCs and as build-your-own bare-bones models, have louder-than-normal fans but offer good performance and all the ports and expandability that most people need.

We expect to recommend NUCs in the future, but this is a bad time to buy one. Older NUCs with 10th-generation Intel processors are available, but newer, 11th-generation NUCs with much-improved integrated GPUs still aren’t available from most retailers. We think those newer models will be worth buying when you can get them, but one of our other picks will serve your needs better in the short term.

What about gaming mini PCs?

Gaming mini PCs promise PC gaming in a package smaller than most game consoles, but they don’t make sense for most people. Gaming mini PCs are considerably pricier than the models in this guide, and buying one is usually much more expensive than building a larger PC yourself.4 They run hot, which can lead to a shorter lifetime for the components. The components are slower than what you get in a midrange gaming PC, and you’re usually limited in the kinds of CPU and GPU upgrades you can perform when you need more speed. In most instances, you should still stick to a gaming PC in a Mini-ITX case if you’re looking for something small, because such a PC will have better cooling, cost less to build, and be easier to upgrade later on. If you’re more concerned about portability, a gaming laptop is a better option.

We’ve tested Intel’s upcoming Phantom Canyon NUC, which runs on an 11th-generation quad-core Intel Core i7 processor and an Nvidia GeForce RTX GPU (neither is upgradable) and will cost at least $1, once you’ve added memory, storage, and an operating system. The performance is great for the size, it has a nice selection of ports and plenty of them, and its fan isn’t as loud as those in regular NUC models. But a quad-core processor may struggle to run games made with the new Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5 consoles in mind, and the RTX is already a two-year-old midrange GPU. A prebuilt gaming desktop from Dell, HP, Lenovo, or other, smaller PC builders will be larger, but it will also cost about the same amount, perform as well or better, and age more gracefully.

A handful of other powerful bare-bones gaming mini PCs exist, but most of them come from smaller companies like ASRock and Zotac and have shorter warranties and worse support. They’re also harder to find and to buy, and their makers haven’t always updated them to use the newest processors and GPUs.

What to look forward to

At the CES virtual trade show, Zotac announced the Magnus One gaming mini PC, which offers 10th-generation Intel processors and a GeForce RTX GPU. Unlike many gaming mini PCs we’ve seen over the years, the Magnus One allows you to remove and replace the GPU, which will keep the computer current as games become more demanding, but its $2, price is high even for a PC with these components. We’ll test it as soon as we can.

Intel has announced its 11th-generation Core desktop processors, and they’ll begin appearing in desktops later in (these CPUs are not to be confused with Intel’s 11th-generation laptop processors, which have been available for several months). These chips should be a modest, not life-changing, upgrade from the current, 10th-generation processors, and they’re probably not worth waiting for if you need a new computer right now, but we’ll start testing new models that use these processors as they’re released.

The competition

Windows PCs

The Lenovo ThinkCentre M80q Tiny and M90q Tiny are virtually indistinguishable from the M70q Tiny, as they provide most of the same ports and processor options. The M90q Tiny also offers Intel processors that use more power and run faster than the T-series Intel chips in most of the mini PCs we recommend. But both models cost more than the M70q Tiny when you configure them with the same processor, memory, and storage options, and there’s no good reason for most people to pay more.

Dell’s OptiPlex Micro is the company’s most direct competitor to Lenovo’s ThinkCentre M70q Tiny. The two systems use the same 10th-generation Intel Core processors, they each have two RAM slots and M.2 storage that’s easy to upgrade, they’re about the same size, and they use a similar amount of power. But the Micro is usually more expensive than the M70q Tiny, and it doesn’t have a USB-C port on the front. The OptiPlex Micro and OptiPlex Micro add a front USB-C port but are generally more expensive than a Micro or M70q Tiny configured with similar specs.

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-mini-desktop-pcs/

I5 mini pc core

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intel NUC10i5FNH intel NUC Mini PC Kit Build

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