Craftsman motors

Craftsman motors DEFAULT

Old Craftsman Table Saw Motor

Look at the website which I'll leave below, they have a wealth of information on how to select the right replacement motor, and FAQ's and more information. Great read.
Duty is rated as service factor, where 1.0 = published HP. A service factor more than 1 means it can deliver more than the rated HP.
Can you say "marketing forces"? Again, look at the emotorstore.com site, they have a lot of info that explains what you need to look for in a motor, and what the terms mean.
>>"Walt C>> >>>I have a similar Craftsman motor, about 48 years old. The capacitor is in >>>the base. Sounds like a problem in the starting circuit, might try cleaning >>>the starting switch. I THINK these motors were made by Emerson Electric? >>>Mine is a model 115.-----, the 115 tells who the manufacture was if I would >>>take the time to check the Sears manufacture code index. >> >>Yeah I think that is Emerson. >> >>Again, there are motor shops that work on such things, take it in and >>have them look at it. Mine is doing business now as >>

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but I've been going to their physical store >>since I was a kid, with dad. Bring in the motor, and walk out with what >>is needed. >> >>That it rotates backwards, suggests you have the windings wrong, and >>need to reverse one of the wires. >> >>I don't know which one, of course. >> >>I've only a 3/4 hp 115 vac motor, so I can't help there. >> > > > >
Sours: https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/old-craftsman-table-saw-motor-496945-.htm
The engines with the craftsman model numbers were manufactured by the Tecumseh Product Company for Sears Roebuck and Company. Additionally, these engines can be identified by using a cross-reference chart for Craftsman engines.
TWO-STROKE CYCLE MODELSFOUR-STROKE CYCLE ENGINES
Craftsman Model NumberTecumseh Type NumberCraftsman Model NumberTecumseh Model NumberCraftsman
143.17112638-07143.V20A-1-1Vertical
143.17112638-071WAV 20 DVertical
143.171122638-01A
143.171272638-51
200.183112638-07A
200.183122638-17A
200.183132638-07B
200.183142638-17B
200.183152650-44
200.183162650-29A
200.183172670-39
200.183182670-32
200.183192670-18
200.213112670-39A
200.213122670-32A
200.5031111525A
200.5831111499
200.5931211525
200.6131111553

Pages:123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263646566676869707172737475767778798081828384858687888990919293949596

Sours: https://classic-engines.com/engines-2/craftsman/
  1. Antique smokers chair
  2. Test overwatch ping
  3. Junction 35 whiskey

The Vintage Craftsman GP Motor Thread

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I was requested to outline some of my comparison information about Vintage Craftsman General Purpose Motors by a fellow GJ member. Most of this information was available on the forum prior to the 2021 forum update but has been lost or difficult to locate ever since.

I am not an electrician and my knowledge of motors in general is fairly limited, but I will endeavor to provide some relevant information here. If you are restoring a vintage piece of Craftsman powered tool equipment, chances are you will have one of these motors or a variation of one outlined here.

I welcome your comments, questions, input, and contributions to this thread so that we can all have a resource to assist others.

Craftsman sold most of their power tool equipment in the pre and post WWII eras without motors. You would buy a drill press or similar tool and mount a motor to the tool. Almost all of these tools were belt driven and required an ac motor ranging from ¼ - 2 HP depending on the tool and the needs of the user. These motors typically came in three RPM variations: 1725 RPM, 1750 RPM, and 3450 RPM.

Drill Presses and other tools used 1725/ 1750 RPM motors in 1/4HP, 1/3HP, 1/2HP, 1 HP, and 2HP; although ½ HP seems to be the most common. Table Saws, Sander, Jointers, and other tools used 3450 RPM motors in similar HP ratings. Almost all of these motors were thermally protected utilizing a Klixon Thermal protection switch incorporated into the motor housing.

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Most of these motors were not wired with a power cord when purchased and it was left to the owner to wire the motor for their application. Further, most of these motors were reversible and often had dual shaft configurations.

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The majority of these motors were capacitor start motors, but a few were split phase motors. Lastly, most of these motors utilized ball bearings; however, a few utilized sleeve bearings. I will try to break down these differences and explain some general design features of these motors before we start to look at the various motors themselves.

Like I said, I am not an electrician so speaking intelligently about horsepower or amperage are not in my skill set. I typically follow the recommend HP listed in the owner’s manual for the power tool I am rebuilding. Since we are talking about vintage machinery, most of the time these tools will include a motor that the previous owner (PO) affixed to the equipment. This is not a given that the PO utilized the correct motor and there are times where the PO used a non-Craftsman motor. I prefer to replace the motor in these instances with a period correct Craftsman motor.

Another thing to be aware of is that Craftsman did not make these motors. Craftsman contacted motor manufacturers to produce these motors for the Craftsman line of tools. This means that most of these motors were produced by GE, Dunlap, Emerson, Packard Electric, Sunlight Electric, Delco to name a few.

Your first starting point for vintage Craftsman powered tools and the motors is the Vintage Machinery site here:

Sears | Craftsman - History | VintageMachinery.org


On the Sears Craftsman page, you can find most of the user manuals and parts diagrams you need to rebuild your vintage tools (look for the publication reprints tab). There is a photo index of powered tools as well as a ton of information. One of the first things you should notice is the list of known makers. This list has links to the actual manufacturer of Craftsman power tool you are researching. Locate the model number of what you are looking for and the prefix should lead you to the manufacturer. For example, the 115.6962 motor has a prefix of 115 and was manufactured for Craftsman by the Sunlight Electrical Manufacturing Company or Packard Electric Company. This will aid in determining the age of your tool and possible date of manufacturing.

One of the largest Craftsman power tool communities here on GJ is the Classic Craftsman King Seeley Drill Press thread started by the Awesome FrankLee. In determining the age of these amazing drill presses (DP) we often look for date stamps on the motors associated with the DPs as well as the dates on the capacitors. In general, we can determine the date of manufacturing within a few years with this information along with design features known to evolve in the 4 decades these machines were made.

So you have a power tool and you need a motor, you locate the owner’s manual for your tool on Vintage Machinery and it says you need a ½ HP 1725 RPM motor or you already have a motor but you do not know what type motor you have. Do you need or have a split phase or capacitor start motor? What is the difference between the two and is one better than the other?

Split Phase vs Capacitor Start Motors

Induction motors use an electromagnetic process produced by the run windings in the stator to spin the rotor/ shaft. This rotation on most of the motors we will discuss is reversible to suit the needs of the user. Regardless, induction motors need something extra to interrupt the normal phase of the energized run windings to start the spinning of the rotor. For the motors we are discussing here, there are two methods to accomplish this. If there is no interruption in the run phase of the windings a rotor will likely just wiggle back and forth a very small amount and the motor will hum. On a capacitor start motor this normally means the capacitor is bad. On a split phase motor, this normally means there is a problem with the start phase windings (possibly a break in the winding).

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A Capacitor start motor will have a capacitor attached to the motor. In the 115 series motor it is a sardine can size rectangle enclose in the base of the motor. On a 397 series motor, the capacitor may be inside the motor housing or attached to the outside of the stator band in a covered hump. There are motors with more than one capacitor, but we are not going to discuss those motors in this thread. In general terms, a capacitor start motor will start with more torque and more efficiency than a split phase motor. Further, if the capacitor is bad, you can replace it and most likely the motor will run fine.

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A split phase motor interrupts the phase of the run windings by energizing a second set of windings in the stator. This second set of windings is referred to as the start phase windings. There will most likely not be a capacitor on these motors, and you should be able to see a physical difference between he two types of windings inside the stator. Regardless, if the motor refuses to start, it is likely there is a break in the start phase windings and fixing this will more than likely be difficult. For this reason, I prefer the capacitor start motor over the split phase motor.

Lastly, when you turn an induction motor on there is a centrifugal switch on the rotor that at a certain rotation speed disengages the start phase of the motor. On a capacitor start motor, this switch disconnects the capacitor. On a split phase motor this switch cuts power to the start phase windings. If you have a motor that will start but then starts to smoke, it is likely the centrifugal switch failing to cut power to the capacitor or start phase windings. When you turn off the motor, as it spins down you should hear a single click. That is the centrifugal switch returning to the start position. If you do not hear this click, you may a problem. I have taken these switches apart to clean, but I have had some bad experiences with switches that worked fine before I disassembled them and later failed to operate correctly. Now I don’t really mess with them and choose to leave them intact during my cleaning process.

Bearings- Ball bearings and Sleeve Bearings

Ball bearings come in an insane number of sizes, types, and variations for an equally insane number of applications. Before we deep dive into ball bearings, what type of ball bearings do you need for your motor? If you have located your owner’s manual on Vintage Machinery and you look at the parts diagram you may see a part number associated with the ball bearing. Something like Part No. 908502 Ball Bearing – New Departure. Well this is some help, but it will take a bit more to locate and order a replacement ball bearing for your motor. So, some intelligent people on Vintage Machinery built a Craftsman Replacement Ball Bearing List for us all to use. Here is the link:

wiki.vintagemachinery.orgwiki.vintagemachinery.org

Ball bearings for these motors are typically single row, deep groove, shielded (one side) ball bearings. Some will have extended races, and some will have metric measurements but require a very specific 5/8” inner diameter. There are shielded, sealed and open versions of most of the bearings.

Shielded and Open Bearings

Shielded bearings have a metal shield covering the balls on one side and a double shielded bearing will have a metal shielded on both sides of the bearing. These are pictures of a New Departure 8502 Radial/Deep Groove Ball Bearing One Side Single Seal and One Side Open. This is the actual bearing that is used in the 115 motor and is Craftsman Part No. 908502. Note that typically an open sided ball bearing will have a felt or wool washer inside the motor that will protect the open side.

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In the first pic notice the nomenclature stamped into the shield “ND 8502 MADE IN USA”. Often these bearing companies are no longer in business; however, you can still find new/ old stock of these bearings on ebay or you can find comparable bearings from other manufacturers.

Sealed Ball Bearings

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Very similar to shielded bearings, sealed bearings use a synthetic material to seal the bearing. Plastics and other materials are normally used and are often black, red, green or blue in color. Sealed ball bearings are typically sealed on both sides and the nomenclature is stamped into the seal or on the edge of the race. In the picture above you can see this is an 88503 bearing. There is no manufacturer name on the bearing, and these are most likely made in china. This is a replacement bearing for the New Departure 88503 felt seal bearing used on Delta grinders. The original New Departure bearing was a one side shielded felt seal bearing. Also note this bearing is an extended race bearing. The race of a bearing is the metal wall on the outside and inside the bore of the bearing. On this bearing the extended race is the inner race, and this ensures a larger coverage of the rotor shaft.

So why are there shielded and sealed bearings? Well one difference is the tolerance the bearing has inside. Depending on application, a ball bearing is made with more or less tolerance to balance speed, use and friction. Another difference is friction itself. Typically, a sealed bearing will generate more friction and produce more heat. Over time this can shorten the life of the bearing but ensure a contaminate free interior. Again, there are millions of uses for ball bearings and most likely an equal number of bearing types. For motors and most other vintage tools, I prefer shielded bearings, but I have used sealed bearings in these applications with no ill effects. I am not a fan of the open ball bearing and when I replace an OEM bearing, I try to do so with a double shielded bearing.

Lastly, the biggest difference in shielded and sealed bearings is more than likely, the price. Sealed bearings are the most common and are almost always cheaper than shielded and even open bearings. For replacement bearings, if you locate new/ old stock on ebay you can pay about $40.00 for a new departure bearing but the same bearing from china may cost $4.00. I recommend you buy bearings from Accurate bearings here:

www.accuratebearing.com

Accurate Bearing Company supplies only the Highest Quality Electric Motor Grade Bearings priced to save you money.

www.accuratebearing.comwww.accuratebearing.com

You will need measurements for the bearing, and you can use this chart to figure out what you need.

http://vintagemachinery.org/files/PDF/FAQ/BearingID.pdf


If you are ordering bearings from an Asia manufacturer, Japanese manufacturers are higher quality than almost all the Chinese manufacturers. In the end, bearings are an extremely important component in your tool or motor and ensures a level of accuracy and smooth operation. If you plan on opening up a motor or tool to clean/ paint it, then go ahead and take the time to replace the bearings with quality bearings. This is a fairly simple and cheap thing you can do to tune up that tool.

Sleeve Bearings

Sleeve Bearings are simple a wool or felt wick stuffed into a cavity on the end frames of a motor. The wool or felt is lubricated with oil and there is a thin metal shield between the wick and the rotor shaft.

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In this picture you can make out the thin metal shield that is the bore for the rotor shaft. behind the shield you can make out the felt wick.

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In this pic you can see a rubber cap in the bottom of the pic below the data plate. on a sleeve bearing motor there will be two of these rubber caps, one on each end frame to lubricate each sleeve bearing. I am sure there is some chart out there that tells you how often you should lubricate the sleeve bearings, but I just do it every year and that seems to work for me.

You can imagine that if you over lube the sleeve bearings and the motor is place vertically, it will more than likely leak oil. The mess in general and the less efficient nature of a sleeve bearing makes this my least desirable type of motor to use. It seems to me that the sleeve bearings and split phase motors both seem to be cost cutting methods in motor design; however, like I said, I am not an electrician.

Now let’s talk Craftsman motors.

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115.6962 Motor

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These are probably the most common and iconic vintage Craftsman motors. There are several motors numbers in this family that are essentially the same motor but in different HPs and RPMs. They are capacitor start ball bearing motors and although there are several similar models, I will talk specifically about the 115.6962 Motor. Most Craftsman general purpose motors were never equipped with on/ off switches; however, it is not uncommon to find an on/off switch in one side of the base and the power cord projecting from the other side of the base.

This motor is 32.5 pounds and is 12 ½” long from shaft ends. The housing is 8 5/8” long and 6 ¼” in diameter. The dual rotor shafts are non-keyed ½” shafts; however, the bearings engage the rotor shaft at a wider part and require a 15mm bore.

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In this pic you can see the two end frames, they are made of cast iron as is the base. The terminal cover, switch shield, air cone, and condenser shield are all made of sheet steel. The two felt retainer discs are also in the pic as well as the rotor.

This is the centrifugal switch on the rotor of a 115 motor

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This is the stator of a 115 motor. Notice the Klixon thermal protection switch (red button) and the lead wires running to the terminal board and switch assembly for the centrifugal switch.

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The lead wires in many of these motors are very stiff and brittle. They have a fabric heat shielding on them that is probably asbestos or similar dangerous material. Exercise care when working with these wires to not break them, if they break close to the windings, it will be very hard to replace them. If you do need to replace a lead wire or extend a broken one, you need to use a high heat lead wire like 16-gauge stranded silicone insulated wire.

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This is a pic of the terminal end frame. note the back side of the Klixon, terminal board, and switch assembly for the centrifugal switch in the center. When the motor is at rest or spinning slowly the centrifugal switch is extended on the rotor shaft and is in contact with this switch allowing power to the capacitor (or in a split phase motor, to the start phase windings). Once the rotor spins to a specific speed, the fingers on the centrifugal switch spread and compress the switch causing it to disengage the switch assembly.

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This pic is a outside looking in of the terminal board. Notice the two lead wires visible, these can be reversed to reverse the direction of the motor rotation.

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In this pic you can see (from left to right) the end frame, open side of the ball bearing, spring washer, fiber gasket, end cap, felt seal, and felt seal cover. One of the cool design features of these 115 motors is that you can access the bearing without opening the motor.

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This is another pic of a terminal end frame; however, notice the metal rectangle on the right side. This is the capacitor on these old 115 motors. These are commonly referred to as sardine can capacitors and are no longer produced. If your capacitor is bad, you will need to replace it with a similar spec round capacitor. This is one of the drawbacks of these motors, there is very little room in the base of the motor and a round capacitor will not fit into the base without some modification. A search for Hoorn here on the GJ should provide some pics for how he fabricated a spacer for a motor to fit a round capacitor.

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This pic is the data stamped on one of these sardine can capacitors. Should you need to replace the capacitor make sure you get a comparable one with similar rated MFD and voltage. Also, note the date of manufacture 5-2-50. Chances are this motor was purchased with the drill press it was affixed to and could help in determining the age of the drill press.

One of the largest benefits to the 115 motor is that it cleans up nicely. Just cleaning and repainting are fairly simple but the stator band on these motors was removable and often the original is too far gone.

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The original stator band was a polished steel band with satin 1/8” lines on it. In the pic above you can see some of the original finish that was left under the data plate. I prefer to use a piece of sheet aluminum cut to the same size.

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Next, I polish the aluminum

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Then I apply 1/8” vinyl masking and scuff the exposed aluminum with a scotch-brite pad.

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The finished product is fairly close to the original.

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With new bearings, a fresh coat of paint and a newly fabricated stator band, this motor looks and runs great.

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That covers this update, I will expand on other motors in the coming days.

Thanks for the interest.

 

Sours: https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/threads/the-vintage-craftsman-gp-motor-thread.484126/
How to install a garage door opener! (Craftsman Smart Garage door opener Model #57918)

Craftsman Motor Restoration

Re: Craftsman Motor Overhaul

At this point, phase 1 disassembly is complete. The end caps, the rotor assembly, the stator assembly, and other loose parts are ready to be cleaned as much as possible. The end caps will be repainted, new bearings will be ordered and installed, and the motor will be reassembled and tested prior to phase 2.



The original bearings for this model are New Departure 77502-16. These are 11mm wide, have a 35mm OD, and a 16mm special bore. Accurate Bearinghas this size in stock, 6202-16. I ordered double sealed bearings.



Parts Cleaning and Painting

I start cleaning parts using a shop-vac with a brush attachment, a small, stiff dry paint brush, and compressed air.



Pieces that can get wet are cleaned with a Zud liquid cleanser and a small scrub brush, rinsed well and dried. Prior to painting, parts are sprayed down with brake cleaner.



End caps primed:



Phase 1 painting is complete:


After painting, a tap was run through the threaded holes to clean out the dirt and overspray.


The chrome bearing covers and screws were cleaned and polished with the buffing wheel and polishing compound.


Electrical

My plan is to install this motor on a drill press. My preference is to have the terminal end of the motor facing down. That means I must change rotation by switching the yellow wires on terminals 1 and 2. This will also give me an opportunity to repair the yellow wire that has cracked insulation.


After removing the yellow wires, the one that was already cracked, got worse. Shrink-wrap works very well.


Wire swap and repair is complete.



Reassembly

I don't have a large enough press, so I tried the freeze/heat techniquethat I learned about here on GJ to reinstall the bearings. Thanks JackDiddly, it really works great!

The night before reassembly, wrap the rotor assembly in a towel and place it in the freezer.

When ready for assembly, place one of the new bearings on a lit light bulb for a few minutes to heat it up.


Retrieve the rotor assembly from the freezer and quickly install the warmed bearing onto the fan end of the rotor. The bearing should slide on effortlessly and fully seat on the rotor shaft. The bearing will quickly cool and tighten onto the shaft.


Place the rotor back in the freezer while prepping the terminal end cap.

Re-install the switch assembly and terminal bar into the terminal end cap. This step is rather awkward when trying to hold the end cap and starting the mounting screws.


Install the terminal end cap onto the stator assembly. Insert one of the thru bolts to prevent the end cap from dropping if it comes loose from the stator.

Warm the second new bearing on the light bulb for several minutes and insert it into the terminal end cap.


Retrieve the rotor assembly from the freezer and, while holding the bearing in place, quickly insert the rotor into the stator assembly and fully seat the rotor shaft into the bearing.


Re-install the fan end cap onto the stator assembly and the rotor bearing in the same orientation as when it was removed.


Re-install the thru bolts and nuts. Give the rotor a test spin by hand to verify nothing is hung-up. Plug in the motor and test under power.


Re-install the terminal cover, the bearing washers and bearing covers in the reverse order in which they were removed.


Phase 1 is complete and it runs like new!

 

Sours: https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/threads/craftsman-motor-restoration.314803/

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  1. 02-05-2016, 11:36 AM#1
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    Default How can I reverse a vintage electric motor

    Thank you for permission to interact on this group. I have been a railroad machinist for 15 years. I have a vintage Craftsman AC electric motor that I want to use with a 1946 Craftsman 3 wheel 12" band saw.I would like to reverse the craftsman motor. Is there anyway I can do this? Thank you.
    Last edited by hotrodjohn71; 02-05-2016 at 02:54 PM.

  2. 02-05-2016, 11:40 AM#2
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    Welcome to the board!

    Can you post a picture of the motor and its tag? That will better help people here provide accurate information.

  3. 02-05-2016, 12:57 PM#3
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  4. 02-05-2016, 01:07 PM#4
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    Change your title of this thread, get rid of the name "Craftsman" and just use motor.

    Read the discussion requirements. Boss Man won't allow discussion of "hobbiest" machines of which Craftsman is one. Reason is there are plenty of other forums for them. This is a professional forum.

    Tom

  5. 02-05-2016, 01:21 PM#5
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    This is a repulsion start- induction run motor. Reversing is accomplished by changing the position of the brushes. On the brush holding assembly there should be provision to move it radially right to left. Move it to the opposite position it is in now. Usually there is a nut or bolt you need to loosen up and tighten back down.

  6. 02-05-2016, 02:03 PM#6
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    Thanks TD, My apologies.

    Admin: Please delete post

  7. 02-05-2016, 02:21 PM#7
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    That sort of motor needs a light oil. It has "ring oilers" inside chambers below the oil holes. If I were putting such a motor back into service after a period of neglect, I would clean out the oil "cellars", as they are sometimes called.

    Automotive motor oil is too thick. You can use "Tractor Hydraulic Oil" if you do not have a ready source of "DTE" (Dynamo, Turbine & Engine) oil. DTR is sometimes marked "Machine Oil"

    The oil holes on that motor are meant to be closed by Gits oil hole covers. I have a motor with that style of oil hole where one end has a regular Gits and the other has the Gits cover at the end of an extension tube. This lets the user oil the motor while having access to only one end.

    Generally a like-able type of motor, as it starts with whiff of ozone and some cool noises as the brushes retract!

    John Ruth

  8. 02-05-2016, 04:44 PM#8
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    Last edited by Superburban; 02-06-2016 at 12:25 AM.

  9. 02-05-2016, 05:14 PM#9
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    The motor should have something like this lever,
    dscn0860.jpgdscn0861.jpg

  10. 02-05-2016, 05:24 PM#10
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    Superurban:

    No disrespect intended, but I believe the motor in this thread is a Repulsion-Induction motor, rather than a "Universal" motor. A Universal motor does have a commutator and brushes, but it can be run on either Alternating Current (AC), or Direct Current (DC). The motor in this thread has a nameplate which says: AC Motor. A Repulsion-Induction motor is an entirely different animal than a Universal Motor. As was noted, R-I motors can have their rotation reversed by shifting the brush ring. It is impossible otherwise, to reverse an R-I motor by reconnecting the leads- as would be the case with a Universal Motor.

    Universal motors were generally built for smaller and higher speed applications such as small home appliances (hair driers, vacuum cleaners, malted milk machines, some table/wall fans), and for power tools such as drills, grinders, saws. Smaller toolpost grinders also use the Universal type motors.

    For driving a power tool or machine tool, if a shop were wired for DC power (as might have been the case years ago), then DC motors such as shunt wound or compound wound would be used. Universal motors filled a very specific and fairly narrow niche. Repulsion Induction motors were quite common for single phase AC motors, well into the '50's. More expensive to build than a capacitor start AC motor, more mechanism to them. I believe an R-I motor has a higher starting torque than a capacitor start motor, so they saw use on things like air compressors and piston-type shallow well pumps which required a very high starting torque.

    As John Ruth notes, an R-I motor is a link to the past. Typically, they will remind anyone old enough to remember streetcars-aka- trolleys- (or to have ridden the NYC subways)a flashback to them. An R-I motor sounds like a subway train or streetcar "winding up" when it starts. There is usually some slight arcing from the brushes with a little crackle and smell of ozone, and then the motor reaches running speed. At that point, there is usually an audible "click" or similar sound when the centrifugal mechanism throws out the starting windings and switches the motor to running as an induction motor. R-I motors are great for shop machinery where single phase power is the only show in town. As noted, the only downside is having to shift the brush ring to reverse them. I have an R-I motor on my old 25" camelback drill, a 3 HP open-frame monster. It is GREAT. I have another R-I motor as part of a gear-reduction motor on my Burke Milling machine. A good motor, but a PITA to reverse. Fortunately, there is an cooling air opening with a removable mesh cover to access the brush ring.

    I like the old R-I motors as they do have a lot more starting torque than a capacitor start motor. And, if a person is into old machine tools, the open frame R-I motors do have "the look" as well as the sound and visual effects.

  11. 02-05-2016, 05:32 PM#11
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    HotRodJohn71,

    Welcome to the Antique Machinery & History forum.

    You can EASILY edit the title of this thread, but there's a TIME LIMIT. Go to the first post, click "Edit" then click "Go Advanced". You can simply delete the C-word as suggested by TDegenhart

    GrannyKnot has shown a Replusionn Start - Induction Run (R-I) motoer with an obvious external reverser. They reversing means are usually not that obvious. All the ones I've seen were like SamShublom's description; you had to go inside the motor to move the brush plate.

    This R-I motor is NOT a "Universal Motor" as I understand the meaning of that term. A Universal uses the commutator for both starting and running. An R-I motor uses the commutator only on starting. It runs as an induction motor.

    Please stay with us - you have an interesting vintage cast iron motor there!

    John Ruth

  12. 02-05-2016, 06:04 PM#12
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    There are two kinds of Repulsion-Induction motors.

    Those that have aluminum bars under the windings and those that don't.

    Don't assume yours does even if the patent says they are there.. if they don't have aluminum (or copper) shorting bars then you can turn your motor into a series wound dc motor.

    You can also add slip rings and make a rotary converter but you'll have to add a power supply to drive the field coils as if it were a parallel wound dc motor. I have not yet tried this with a 3/4th hp motor so i don't know what kinds of voltages you can get, might not be close to anything standard.

    Anyhow, in OP's motor, the shorting bracelet is inside that copper ring/cap that sits at the end of the commutator.. the brushes do not lift off either.

    My 3/4th hp motor was used on a table saw and the reason it failed (i suppose, unsure why it was given to me) was because the centrifugal mechanism to push the shorting bracelet into the commutator was completely clogged up with sawdust. OP's motor is the better of the two styles I've seen.

  13. 02-05-2016, 10:14 PM#13
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    Nothing wrong with Craftsman motors. Only discussion of Atlas machine tools and inexpensive import "hobby" machines is proscribed by the site's owner.

    Mod

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