18th airborne corps artillery

18th airborne corps artillery DEFAULT

18th Field Artillery Brigade

Military unit

The 18th Field Artillery Brigade is the XVIII Airborne Corpsfield artillerybrigade, based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Role and structure[edit]

The 18th Field Artillery Brigade is America's Contingency Field Artillery Brigade. The Brigade plans, synchronizes and employs long range precision strike fires and counterfires in support of the XVIII Airborne Corps, its subordinate divisions, and to Special Operations forces as required. When the call comes, the Brigade is ready to deploy, fight and win. This brigade consists of the following units[1]

Operational history[edit]

The 18th Field Artillery Brigade has served in multiple capacities over the past decade in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom as well as the primary 155mm howitzer and HIMARS identity in the war in Afghanistan. The brigade was the only airborne field artillery brigade in the United States Army with 1st Battalion (Airborne), 321st Field Artillery Regiment providing the majority of the support for the 18th Fires Brigade's airborne mission.

During the 1990s the Brigade had a single M198, 155mm battery (initially Battery C, 5th Battalion, 8th Field Artillery; later Battery C, 1st Battalion, 377th Field Artillery Regiment) assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in support of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). This made for a healthy rivalry with the other two batteries of the Battalion that were assigned in support of the 82nd Airborne Division. It allowed for the entire Battalion to train together at both Fort Campbell and Fort Bragg.

1st Battalion (Airborne), 321st Field Artillery Regiment maintained a full capacity to provide 155mm howitzer fires anywhere in the world within 18 hours in support of the 82d Airborne Division and while supporting other global responsibilities. The unit had the unique ability to employ 155mm howitzer platforms through a "Howitzer Heavy Drop Package" capability which essentially allowed for the weapon system to be dropped from an aircraft while its paratroopers would then place the weapon into action. 1st Battalion (Airborne), 321st Field Artillery Regiment served as the United States Army's primary 155mm howitzer response in the Global War on Terrorism. In October 2013, the battalion's three firing batteries were reflagged to create 155mm composite battalions in the three brigade combat teams of the 82nd Airborne, and the battalion was officially inactivated at Fort Bragg on 14 March 2014.[7]

During 2008 while serving as the General Support Artillery unit in Operation Enduring Freedom 8–9, 3d Section, Battery C, 3d Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment became the first United States Army unit to fire the GPS Guided XM982 Excalibur Munition in support of combat operations while serving in the volatile Kunar Province while supporting the 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team.

3d Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment (HIMARS) has served in the capacity to support various United States Army and other agencies with accurate and effective field artillery rocket fires.

From August 2009 through October 2014, the 18th Fires Brigade wore the "All American" patch of the 82nd Airborne Division. The 18th Fires Brigade became a general support field artillery brigade in July 2008 and was under the Training Readiness Oversight of the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.[8]

The 18th Fires Brigade held a ceremony on 16 October 2014, removing the patch of the 82nd Airborne Division and donning the 18th Field Artillery Brigade patch, to signify its increased responsibility to provide long range field artillery support to the four Divisions in the XVIII Airborne Corps, and officially change its name to the 18th Field Artillery Brigade, a name held by the Brigade since its inception in 1978.[9]

Future[edit]

An article in the Fayetteville Observer dated 23 March 2014 covered the inactivation of the brigade's 1st Battalion (Airborne), 321st FA Regiment and noted the coming inactivation the 2d Battalion in the 4th BCT, 82d Airborne Division. The article added that the brigade's 3d Battalion "will undergo a different transformation as that unit shifts from howitzers to the HIMARS weapons system."[10]

Lineage and honors[edit]

Lineage[edit]

  • Constituted 1 October 1943 in the Army of the United States as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, XVIII Corps Artillery
  • Activated 9 October 1943 at Camp Cooke, California
  • Inactivated 15 October 1945 at Camp Cooke, California
  • Redesignated 1 May 1951 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery, and allotted to the Regular Army
  • Activated 21 May 1951 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina
  • Reorganized and redesignated 16 September 1978 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 18th Field Artillery Brigade
  • Reorganized and redesignated 16 June 2007 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 18th Fires Brigade[11]
  • Reorganized and redesignated 16 October 2014 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 18th Field Artillery Brigade

Campaign participation credit[edit]

  • World War II: Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia, Liberation and Defense of Kuwait
  • War on Terrorism: Campaigns to be determined[11]

Decorations[edit]

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered IRAQ 2005-2006[11]
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Afghanistan-2010

Heraldry[edit]

Shoulder sleeve insignia[edit]

18thFABDENOTAB.png

  • Description/Blazon: On a scarlet shield arched at top and bottom, 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height, a vertical yellow winged cannon, cascabel in base, all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) yellow border.
  • Symbolism: Scarlet and yellow are colors traditionally associated with Artillery units as well as the cannon barrel. The wings are indicative of the mobility, speed and devastating accuracy of the modern artillery.
  • Background: The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 18th Field Artillery Brigade on 29 May 1979. It was amended to include the airborne tab, add metric measurements and revise the description on 21 October 1992. It was again amended to change the color of the airborne tab on 5 February 2003. The insignia was redesignated for the 18th Fires Brigade and amended to delete the airborne tab on 22 March 2007. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-639)

Distinctive unit insignia[edit]

18FiresBdeDUI.jpg

  • Description/Blazon: A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall, consisting of a gold vertical cannon barrel with muzzle end up centered in front of a black fleur-de-lis, and issuant from either side of the barrel below the trunnion a scarlet wing upraised enclosing the sides of the fleur-de-lis; attached in base a gold scroll of three folds bearing in black letters the words "SWEAT SAVES BLOOD."
  • Symbolism: Scarlet and yellow are the colors associated with Artillery. The cannon barrel denotes the organization's basic mission, and the wings refer to the air deployment capability. The fleur-de-lis represents service in Europe during World War II.
  • Background: The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 18th Field Artillery Brigade on 28 August 1979. It was redesignated for the 18th Fires Brigade with the description updated on 22 March 2007.

Combat service identification badge[edit]

  • Description/Blazon: A gold color metal and enamel device 2 inches (5.08 cm) in height consisting of a design similar to the shoulder sleeve insignia.

Former beret flash[edit]

18 FA Bde flash.svg

  • Description/Blazon: On a scarlet shield-shaped embroidered item with a semi-circular base, 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in height by a 1 7/8 inch (4.76 cm) in width overall and edged with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) scarlet border, a yellow lozenge throughout. The beret flash was approved 13 Mar 1994.

Former background trimming[edit]

18th FAB ABN BACKGROUND.png

  • Description/Blazon: On a scarlet oval-shaped embroidered item with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) scarlet border, 1 3/8 inches (3.49 cm) in height and 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width a yellow lozenge throughout. The background trimming was originally approved on 20 Nov 1951. It was amended to include the standard and metric measurements in the description on 20 Feb 1991.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Fictional[edit]

  • In the 1970s television series Battlestar Galactic episodes The Living Legend Part 1 and Part 2 the Battlestar Pegasus unit insignia bore strong resemblance to the unit insignia of the 18th Field Artillery Brigade.

References[edit]

Fort Bragg

FORSCOM

United States Army Reserve Command

First Army
XVIII
Airborne
Corps
Other units
82nd Airborne Division
1st Brigade
Combat Team
2nd Brigade
Combat Team
3rd Brigade
Combat Team
4th Brigade
Combat Team
(Inactivated)
18th Field Artillery
Brigade
Combat Aviation Brigade
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company
  • 1st Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment, Company F
  • 3rd Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment
  • 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment
  • 122nd Aviation Support Battalion
82nd Division
Special Troops
Battalion
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 82nd Airborne Division
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 82nd Division Special Troops Battalion
  • Company A (Signal)
  • 82nd Airborne Division Band
  • 82nd Airborne Division Advanced Airborne School
82nd Sustainment
Brigade
  • Special Troops Battalion
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company
  • 11th Quartermaster Company
  • 21st Chemical Company
  • 18th Human Resources Company
  • 82nd Signal Company
  • 82nd Financial Management Company
  • 125th Mail Movement Team
264th Support Battalion
(Combat Sustainment)
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company
  • 259th Quartermaster Company
  • 364th Quartermaster Company
  • 600th Quartermaster Company
  • 612th Quartermaster Company
  • 659th Maintenance Company
192nd EOD Battalion
  • 192nd Explosive Ordnance Disposal Battalion
Special
Operations
Command
Other units
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/18th_Field_Artillery_Brigade

"Sky Dragons"

(Updated 6-26-08)

The XVIII Airborne Corps is the corps size element of the United States Army designed for rapid deployment anywhere in the world. Referred to as "America's Contingency Corps," it is the largest warfighting organization in the U.S. Army. It is headquartered at Fort Bragg, North Carolina and controls approximately 88,000 soldiers.

Currently assigned to the Eighteenth Corps is the 3rd Infantry Division, 10th Mountain, 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery, the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment, the 108th Air Defense Artillery, the 18th Aviation Brigade, the 229th Aviation Regiment, the 20th Engineer Brigade, the 525 Military Intelligence Brigade, the 16th Military Police Brigade, the 35th Signal Brigade, the 1st Corps Support Command, the 44th Medical Brigade, the 18th Finance Group, the 18th Personnel Group, and the Dragon Brigade.

The XVIII Airborne Corps was originally activated as the II Armored Corps on January 17, 1942. When the armored corps concept proved unnecessary, the unit was re-designated as the XVIII Corps at the Presidio of Monterey, California on October 9, 1943. Click to preview or purchase The current XVIII Airborne Corps celebrates its birthday as August 25, 1944 when the blue airborne tab was added. On that day in Orbourne, St. George, England, the XVIII Airborne Corps assumed command of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions. Within a month the Corps sent their divisions onto a combat jump in the Netherlands for Operation Market Garden.

After the Battle of the Bulge all airborne units in the U.S. Army were placed under the command of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The Corps planned and executed Operation Varsity, the crossing of the Rhine River into Germany, which included the 17th Airborne Division and the British 6th Airborne Division. The Sky Dragons were returned to the United States in June of 1945 and deactivated at Camp Campbell, Kentucky on October 15, 1945.

The XVIII Airborne Corps was reactivated at Fort Bragg, North Carolina on May 21, 1951 as part of the army buildup for Korea and the Cold War. Ever since, the XVIII Airborne Corps has been the primary strategic response force for the United States. The Corps and its various subordinate units have participated in over a dozen major operations in both the combat and humanitarian roles.

During Operation Power Pack the Corps deployed to the Dominican Republic on April 30, 1965. The Sky Dragons served as the headquarters for U.S. forces sent to restore law and order, prevent a communist takeover of the country, and to protect American lives. For Operation Urgent Fury, which began on October 25, 1983, the XVIII Airborne Corps invaded the island nation of Grenada. The Corps provided the bulk of land forces sent to rescue medical students and other stranded Americans. In this operation the Corps participated with our Caribbean allies in an international peacekeeping effort.

During Operation Just Cause, the invasion of Panama on December 20, 1989, the XVIII Airborne Corps was placed in operational command of Joint Task Force South. The Operation simultaneously struck twenty-seven targets and conducted town night parachute assaults to seize critical terrain. Operation Just Cause set the stage for a freely elected government to be established in the country.

Operation Desert Shield began on August 9, 1990. The XVIII Airborne Corps rapidly deployed to Saudi Arabia as the first ground force in theater to spearhead efforts to deter aggression and assist in the defense of friendly nations. This was the largest deployment of American troops since WWII. The Persian Gulf War started with Operation Desert Storm in February of 1991. The Sky Dragons were responsible for covering VII Corps' northern flank. The XVIII Airborne Corp launched the first ground assault into Iraq with the 82nd Airborne Division and the attached French 6th Light Armored Division. The largest, and farthest, air assault in history was conducted by the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). A mounted attack was also made by the 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized) and the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment. In less than 100 hours the XVIII Airborne Corps had effectively sealed off the occupying Iraqi Army and destroyed major elements of the elite Republican Guard.

During the 1990s the XVIII Airborne Corps has deployed countless Corps soldiers to more than twenty-seven countries that include Bosnia, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Haiti. They have also directed countless Joint Exercises that involve all of the services.

The XVIII Airborne Corps' most recent deployments have been in support of America's Global War on Terrorism, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. From January 2005 through January 2006, the Corps was deployed to Baghdad, where it served as the Multi-National-Corps-Iraq. The Sky Dragons deployed again to Iraq in November of 2007.

The XVIII Airborne Corps is superbly trained in tactical, operational, and strategic levels of war. They are capable of exercising the nation's ability to conduct strategic forced entry operations anywhere in the world on 18 hours notice. Those soldiers and veterans who have worn the Sky Dragon shoulder patch are a proud group of men and women who truly served their country on the cutting edge.

 

XVIII Airborne Corps Shop:

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The XVIII Airborne Corps is the corps of the United States Army designed for rapid deployment anywhere in the world. It is referred to as "America's Contingency Corps". Its headquarters are at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

History[]

World War II[]

The corps was first activated on 17 January 1936 as the II Armored Corps at Camp Polk in Louisiana. When the concept of Armored Corps proved unnecessary, II Armored Corps was redesignated as XVIII Corps on 9 October 1937 at the Presidio of Monterey, California.

XVIII Corps deployed to Europe on 17 August 1944 and became the XVIII Airborne Corps on 25 August 1944 at Osbourne, St. George, England, assuming command of the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions, as part of the preparation for Operation Market Garden. Prior to this time the 101st Airborne and 82nd Airborne were assigned to VII Corps and participated in Operation Overlord as part of VII Corps.[1]

Major General Matthew B. Ridgway commanded the corps, which then consisted of the 82nd Airborne Division and the 101st Airborne Division and was part of the First Allied Airborne Army. Following the Battle of the Bulge, all airborne units in the U.S. Army fell under the command of the corps. XVIII Airborne Corps planned and executed Operation Varsity, the crossing of the Rhine river into Germany. It was one of the largest airborne operations in World War II, including the 17th Airborne Division and the British 6th Airborne Division. The 13th Airborne Division was to participate in the assault, however due to a lack of a sufficient number of transports, it was unable to take part. The XVIII Airborne Corps returned to the U.S. in June 1945 and inactivated on 15 October 1945 at Camp Campbell, Kentucky.

Cold War to Desert Storm[]

The corps was reactivated at Fort Bragg on 21 May 1951 under the command of Major GeneralJohn W. Leonard. Since then, the corps has been the primary strategic response force, with subordinate units participating in over a dozen major operations (listed below) in both combat and humanitarian roles, primarily in Central America and the CENTCOM area of responsibility.[citation needed]

In 1958 the XVIII Airborne Corps was given the additional designation of the Strategic Army Corps. The designation was, in reality, the assignment of an additional mission rather than a true designation. The additional mission was to provide a flexible strike capability that could deploy worldwide on short notice without declaration of an emergency. The 4th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington, and the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, were designated as STRAC's first-line divisions, while the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas, and the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg were to provide backup in the event of general war. The 5th Logistical Command (later inactivated), also at Fort Bragg, would provide the corps with logistics support, while Fort Bragg's XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery would control artillery units.[2]

The corps deployed forces to the United States occupation of the Dominican Republic ('Operation Power Pack') in 1965. In 1989 XVIII Airborne Corps, commanded by then LTG Carl Stiner, participated in the invasion of Panama in Operation Just Cause. Stiner served concurrently as Commander of Joint Task Force South.

In 1991, XVIII Airborne Corps participated in the Persian Gulf War. The corps was responsible for securing VII Corps' northern flank against a possible Iraqi counterattack. Along with the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, 24th Infantry Division and 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, XVIII Airborne Corps also gained operational control of the French 6th Light Armor Division (LAD) (which also included units from the French Foreign Legion).

During Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery consisted of the 5-8th, 3-8th and 1-39th Field Artillery Regiments (FAR). The living quarters for these three units were situated between the 82d Airborne Division and the Special Forces at Fort Bragg. Of the three units, only 1-39th was airborne qualified and served as the only fully airborne deployable 155mm Field Artillery unit in history.[citation needed] The 1-39th FAR and 3-8th FAR were key components of the thrust into Iraq in the first Gulf War, providing fire support for the French Foreign Legion and the 82nd Airborne Division. All of the battalions were subsequently re-flagged during the years following the Gulf War. The 5th Battalion, 8th Field Artillery also served in a major support role for 82nd and French troops during the Gulf War.

21st century[]

Main article: Transformation of the United States Army

XVIII Airborne Corps was most recently deployed, from January 2005 to January 2006, to Baghdad, Iraq, where it served as the Multi-National Corps – Iraq. Following its return, XVIII Airborne Corps and its subordinate units began the process of modernization and reorganization.

Under the previous Army Chief of Staff's future restructure of the Army, the corps headquarters of the XVIII Airborne Corps will lose its airborne (specifically parachute) certification as a cost-cutting measure—the same will occur to the divisional headquarters of 82nd Airborne Division. This plan is designed to follow the U.S. Army's restructuring plan to go from being division-based to brigade-based. This will mean that the largest units that will be airborne—specifically parachute certified—will be at the brigade level. Even so, for traditional and historical reasons, the formation will continue to be called the XVIII Airborne Corps.

The divisions that fall under the XVIII Airborne Corps (as well as the other two corps in the Army) are in a period of transition, shifting from corps control to fall directly under FORSCOM, eliminating the corps status as a middle man. This ties in with the Army's broad modularity plan, as a corps can deploy and support any unit, not just the units subordinate to the corps. The 3rd Infantry Division, the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), and the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) have already changed over to direct FORSCOM control. The 82nd Airborne Division will transfer after the division returns from Afghanistan.

In August 2006, XVIII Airborne Corps traveled to South Korea to participate in Ulchi Focus Lens, a joint training exercise between the Republic of Korea Army and coalition forces stationed there.[3]

In mid-April, 2007, the Department of the Army confirmed the next OIF deployment schedule, with XVIII Airborne Corps deploying to relieve III Corps as the MNC-I at Camp Victory, Baghdad, Iraq. XVIII Airborne Corps is scheduled to replace III Corps in November, 2007. The corps will deploy along with 1st Armored Division and 4th Infantry Division, as well as 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, and 1st BCT, 82nd Airborne Division.[4]

General information[]

Command group[]

Subordinate units[]

World War II[]

Post World War II through 2006[]

Current structure[]

XVIII Airborne Corps CSIB.svgXVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg

Other major units stationed along the XVIII Corps units are:

  • 16th Military Police Brigade, Fort Bragg
  • 18th Fires Brigade, Fort Bragg
  • 20th Engineer Brigade, Fort Bragg
  • 525th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, Fort Bragg
  • 1st Sustainment Command (Theater), Fort Bragg
  • 3rd Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort Knox
  • 20th Support Command (CBRNE), Aberdeen Proving Grounds
  • 1st Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, Fort Polk
  • 35th Signal Brigade, Fort Gordon
  • 108th Air Defense Artillery Brigade, Fort Bragg
  • 18th Air Support Operations Group, Pope Field (United States Air Force unit responsible for coordinating corps tactical air support)

The corps’s divisions are supported by the following sustainment brigades, which are under direct command of United States Army Forces Command:

Operations[]

The corps has participated in a number of operations since then:

  • Operation Power Pack – Dominican Republic, 1965
  • Operation Urgent Fury – Grenada, 1983
  • Operation Golden Pheasant – Honduras, 1988
  • Operation Nimrod Dancer – Panama, 1989
  • Operation Hawkeye – U.S. Virgin Islands, 1989
  • Operation Just Cause – Panama, 1989
  • Operation Desert Shield – Saudi Arabia, 1990–1991
  • Operation Desert Storm – Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq, 1991
  • Operation GTMO – Cuba, 1991
  • Operation Hurricane Andrew – Florida, 1992
  • Operation Restore Hope – Somalia, 1992
  • Operation Uphold/Maintain Democracy – Haiti, 1994
  • Operation Vigilant Warrior – Kuwait, 1994
  • Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan, 2002
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom – Iraq, 2005
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom – Iraq, 2008
  • Operation Unified Response – Haiti, 2010
  • Operation New Dawn – Iraq, 2011

Former commanders[]

Taken from Fort Bragg website

  • Matthew B. Ridgway, MG
  • John W. Leonard, MG
  • Thomas F. Hickey, MG
  • Joseph P. Cleland, MG
  • Ridgely Gaither, MG
  • Paul D. Adams, MG
  • Robert Frederick Sink, LTG
  • Dwight E. Beach, MG
  • Thomas J. H. Trapnell, LTG
  • Hamilton H. Howze, LTG
  • William C. Westmoreland
  • Harry H. Critz, MG
  • John W. Bowen, LTG
  • John A. Seitz, BG
  • Roderick Wetherill, BG
  • Joe S. Lawrie, MG
  • Bruce Palmer, Jr., LTG
  • John L. Throckmorton, LTG
  • Robert H. York, LTG
  • John J. Tolson, LTG
  • John H. Hay, LTG
  • Richard J. Seitz, LTG
  • Henry (Hank) Emerson, LTG
  • Volney F. Warner, LTG
  • Thomas H. Tackaberry, LTG
  • Jack V. Mackmull, LTG
  • James J. Lindsay, LTG
  • John W. Foss, LTG
  • Carl W. Stiner, LTG
  • Gary E. Luck, LTG
  • William A. Roosma, MG
  • Gary E. Luck, LTG
  • Henry H. Shelton, LTG
  • John M. Keane, LTG
  • William F. Kernan, LTG
  • Dan K. McNeill, LTG
  • John R. Vines, LTG
  • Lloyd Austin III, LTG
  • Frank Helmick, LTG

Notable members[]

  • John D. Altenburg, MG - Deputy Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Army
  • Ralph Eaton, BG- Corps chief of staff
  • Michael C. Flowers, BG- Commander of Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command
  • Michael T. Flynn, LTG- Director, Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Charles D. Gemar, LTC- astronaut
  • Bernard Kerik, New York City Police Commissioner
  • Teresa King, SGM- First female commandant of U.S. Army Drill Sergeant School
  • Stanley A. McChrystal, GEN- ISAF commander
  • David Petraeus, GEN- Former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
  • Thomas R. Turner II, LTG- commanding general of United States Army North
  • James Peake, LTG- Secretary of Veterans Affairs
  • David M. Rodriguez, GEN -FORSCOM commander
  • Arthur D. Simons, COL- Led Son Tay raid
  • Michael Tomczyk, CPT- Computer entrepreneur
  • James C. Yarbrough, BG- JRTC/Fort Polk commander

See also[]

References[]

External links[]

Fort Bragg

FORSCOM

United States Army Reserve Command

First Army
XVIII
Airborne
Corps

Other units

82nd Airborne Division

1st Brigade
Combat Team

  • 1st Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 504th Infantry Regiment
  • 3rd Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment
  • 307th Brigade Support Battalion
  • Special Troops Battalion

2nd Brigade
Combat Team

  • 1st Battalion, 325th Infantry Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment
  • 1st Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment
  • 407th Brigade Support Battalion
  • Special Troops Battalion

3rd Brigade
Combat Team

  • 1st Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment
  • 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry Regiment
  • 5th Squadron, 73d Cavalry Regiment
  • 1st Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment
  • 82nd Brigade Support Battalion
  • Special Troops Battalion

4th Brigade
Combat Team
(Inactivated)

  • 2nd Battalion, 321st Airborne Field Artillery Regiment
  • 782nd Brigade Support Battalion
  • Special Troops Battalion

18th Fires
Brigade

  • Headquarters & Headquarters Battery
  • 1st Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment
  • 188th Brigade Support Battalion
  • D Battery, 26th Field Artillery Regiment
  • 206th Signal Company

Combat Aviation Brigade

  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company
  • 1st Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment, Company F
  • 3rd Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment
  • 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment
  • 122nd Aviation Support Battalion

82nd Division
Special Troops
Battalion

  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 82nd Airborne Division
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 82nd Division Special Troops Battalion
  • Company A (Signal)
  • 82nd Airborne Division Band
  • 82nd Airborne Division Advanced Airborne School

82nd Sustainment
Brigade

  • Special Troops Battalion
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company
  • 11th Quartermaster Company
  • 21st Chemical Company
  • 18th Human Resources Company
  • 82nd Signal Company
  • 82nd Financial Management Company
  • 125th Mail Movement Team

264th Support Battalion
(Combat Sustainment)

  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company
  • 259th Quartermaster Company
  • 364th Quartermaster Company
  • 600th Quartermaster Company
  • 612th Quartermaster Company
  • 659th Maintenance Company

192nd EOD Battalion

  • 192nd Explosive Ordnance Disposal Battalion
Special
Operations
Command
Other units
Sours: https://military.wikia.org/wiki/XVIII_Airborne_Corps_(United_States)
18th Field Artillery Brigade

Military


In 2007, as part of the reorganization of XVIII Corps (Airborne) as part of the modular transformation of the US Army, XVIII Corps Artillery was inactivated and 18th Fires Brigade (Airborne) was reassigned directly to XVIII Corps.

The XVIII Corps Artillery (Airborne) provided fire support to XVIII Corps (Airborne) forces, anywhere in the world, on short notice, by land, sea, or air. XVIII Corps Artillery provided long-range, accurate, destructive, day or night fire support for all combat operations. XVIII Corps Artillery was the headquarters for all non-divisional artillery within the XVIII Corps.

XVIII Corps Artillery had to be ready to command and control additional fire support assets, up to 8 brigades, as they became available in theater during contingency operations. Units within the corps artillery could be given the mission of reinforcing, general support, or general support reinforcing. This battlefield organization allowed the Commander to mass all artillery fires and/or weight a specific effort to influence the battle.

18th Field Artillery Brigade (subsequently 18th Fires Brigade) traced its lineage and honors to the XVIII Corps Artillery, which had been constituted during the Second World War. On 16 November 1984, a provisional corps artillery was organized from elements of the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 18th Field Artillery Brigade and a Field Artillery Section from the XVIII Corps Staff. Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, XVIII Corps Artillery was formally reconstituted and activated as a separate entity in March 1987 as part of the Army of Excellence initiative.

This headquarters provided the command and control for multiple field artillery brigade deployments critical to a contingency corps. However, XVIII Corps Artillery had only one active component brigade assigned to it, the 18th Field Artillery Brigade (Airborne). The 1st Field Artillery Detachment (Target Acquisition) was also assigned to the unit at its activation, the only corps-level target acquisition detachment in the Army at that time.

XVIII Corps Artillery also had relationships with a large number of reserve component field artillery brigades. Capstone/Directed Training Association Reserve Component field artillery brigades were full-time teammates. XVIII Corps Artillery contributed to their unique training requirements, while they were tempered by the challenge of fast-paced Active Component JTXs.

In August 1992, the 42nd Field Artillery Brigade with the 4th Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery, upon relocating from Hanau, Germany to Fort Polk, Louisiana, became part of XVIII Corps Artillery, before being inactivated. In 1994, the Wartrace Program replaced the Capstone program, but XVIII Corps Artillery relationships remained.

By 2000, XVIII Corps Artillery had evolved into a fully functional Headquarters whose mission was to maintain a crisis response field artillery force. The force was capable of rapid deployment by air, to include parachute assault by selected elements, and deployment by surface means anywhere in the world ready to provide conventional fires and coordinate all other fire support assets against surface targets. The massive firepower of the corps artillery was tailored to meet various contingencies and include up to 6 field artillery brigades.

The Automated Deep Operations Coordination System (ADOCS) was an information system that provided the Fire Support Element and the Deep Operations Coordination Cell (DOCC) an integrated set of tools for fire support coordination data management and analysis, along with mission planning, coordination, and execution. ADOCS was organized as a series of data managers including: map; fire mission coordination; suppression of enemy air defense (SEAD) planner; artillery locations; aircraft interdiction (AI) nominations; close air support (CAS) mission coordination; airspace control request; aviation routes; and airspace control points, all of which enabled ADOCS to provide horizontal and vertical coordination amongst echelons.

Automated Tactical and Fire Direction systems, formerly used by the XVIII Corps Artillery, were the Light Tactical Fire Direction System (LT TACFIRE) and the Interim Fire Support Automated System (IFSAS). These systems were capable of transmitting, receiving, storing, and processing critical information needed on the battlefield by Field Artillery units. LT TACFIRE and IFSAS were used until replaced in the fourth quarter of FY97, with the Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS). AFATDS increased the Corps Artillery's capability of processing battlefield information.

With the beginning of the modular transformation of the US Army, the formal relationships that existed as part of the Wartrace Program ceased to exist. However, integrated training exercises and cooperation between active component and reserve component forces remained.




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    Episode 65: Market Garden: What went wrong: Command Structure, Daytime drop, Monty

    XVIII Airborne Corps

    Military unit

    The XVIII Airborne Corps is a corps of the United States Army that has been in existence since 1942 and saw extensive service during World War II. The corps is designed for rapid deployment anywhere in the world and is referred to as "America's Contingency Corps". Its headquarters are at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.[2]

    Leadership[edit]

    Its command group includes:

    History[edit]

    World War II[edit]

    The corps was first activated on 17 January 1942, five weeks after the entry of the United States into World War II, as the II Armored Corps at Camp Polk, Louisiana, under the command of Major GeneralWilliam Henry Harrison Morris, Jr.. When the concept of armored corps proved unnecessary, II Armored Corps was re-designated as XVIII Corps on 9 October 1943 at the Presidio of Monterey, California. [4]

    XVIII Corps deployed to Europe on 17 August 1944 and became the XVIII Airborne Corps on 25 August 1944 at Ogbourne St. George, England, assuming command of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, as part of the preparation for Operation Market Garden. Prior to this time, the two divisions were assigned to VII Corps and jumped into Normandy during Operation Overlord, the Alliedinvasion of Normandy, as part of VII Corps.[5] Major General Matthew Bunker Ridgway, a highly professional, competent and experienced airborne commander who had led the 82nd Airborne Division in Sicily, Italy and Normandy, was chosen to command the corps, which then consisted of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions and was part of the newly created First Allied Airborne Army.

    The corps headquarters did not see service in Operation Market Garden, with the British I Airborne Corps being chosen instead to exercise operational command of all Allied airborne forces in the operation, including the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

    Following the Battle of the Bulge, in which the corps played a significant part (and which, during the early stages of the battle, the corps was commanded by Major General James M. Gavin of the 82nd Airborne), all American airborne units on the Western Front fell under command of the corps. XVIII Airborne Corps planned and executed Operation Varsity, the airborne component of Operation Plunder, the crossing of the River Rhine into Germany. It was one of the largest airborne operations of the war, with the British 6th and U.S. 17th Airborne Divisions under command. After taking part in the Western Allied invasion of Germany, the XVIII Airborne Corps, still under Ridgway, returned to the United States in June 1945 and was initially to take part in the invasion of Japan, codenamed Operation Downfall. However, the Japanese surrendered just weeks later and XVIII Airborne Corps was inactivated on 15 October 1945 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. [6]

    World War II units[edit]

    Cold War[edit]

    The Corps was reactivated at Fort Bragg on 21 May 1951 under the command of Major GeneralJohn W. Leonard. Since then, the corps has been the primary strategic response force, with subordinate units participating in over a dozen major operations (listed below) in both combat and humanitarian roles, primarily in Central America and the CENTCOM area of responsibility. [7]

    In 1958 the XVIII Airborne Corps was given the additional mission of becoming the Strategic Army Corps. The corps was now tasked, in addition, to provide a flexible strike capability that could deploy worldwide, on short notice, without a declaration of an emergency. The 4th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington, and the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, were designated as STRAC's first-line divisions, while the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas, and the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg were to provide backup in the event of general war. The 5th Logistical Command (later inactivated), also at Fort Bragg, would provide the corps with logistics support, while Fort Bragg's XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery would control artillery units.[8]

    The Corps deployed forces to the United States occupation of the Dominican Republic ('Operation Power Pack') in 1965.

    The Corps deployed forces to the Vietnam War, including the entire 101st Airborne Division and the 3rd Brigade of the 82nd Airborne division.

    In 1967 elements of the Corps were deployed to Detroit to suppress riots, and also to The Congo to support the government there and to rescue civilian hostages as part of Operation Dragon Rouge.

    In 1982 the Corps first rotated elements to the Sinai Peninsula as part of the Multinational Force and Observers (UN) to guarantee the Camp David Peace Accords. [9]

    In 1983 elements of the Corps were deployed to the island of Grenada as part of Operation Urgent Fury, with the stated goal of reestablishing the democratically elected government.

    In 1989 XVIII Airborne Corps, commanded by then LTG Carl Stiner, participated in the invasion of Panama in Operation Just Cause. Stiner served concurrently as Commander of Joint Task Force South.

    Structure in 1989[edit]

    At the end of the Cold War in 1989 the corps consisted of the following formations and units:

    • XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, North Carolina[10]
      • Headquarters & Headquarters Company
      • 18th Personnel Group
      • 18th Finance Group[11]
      • 1st Battalion, 2nd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Stewart[12]
      • 10th Mountain Division (Light), Fort Drum, New York[10]
      • 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized), Fort Stewart, Georgia[10]
      • 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina[10]
      • 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Kentucky[10]
      • XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery, Fort Bragg
      • 18th Aviation Brigade (Airborne), Fort Bragg
      • 20th Engineer Brigade (Airborne), Fort Bragg[10][25][26]
      • 16th Military Police Brigade (Airborne), Fort Bragg
      • 35th Signal Brigade (Airborne), Fort Bragg[10][33][34]
      • 525th Military Intelligence Brigade (Airborne), Fort Bragg
      • 1st Corps Support Command (Airborne), Fort Bragg[10]
        • subordination formations and units

    Desert Storm[edit]

    In 1991, XVIII Airborne Corps participated in the Persian Gulf War. The corps was responsible for securing VII Corps' northern flank against a possible Iraqi counterattack. Along with the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, 24th Infantry Division and 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, XVIII Airborne Corps also gained operational control of the French 6th Light Armor Division (LAD) (which also included units from the French Foreign Legion).

    During Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery consisted of the 3d Battalion, 8th Field Artillery; 5th Battalion, 8th Field Artillery; and the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 39th Field Artillery. The living quarters for these three units were situated between the 82d Airborne Division and the Special Forces at Fort Bragg. Of the three units, only 1-39th was airborne qualified and served as the only fully airborne deployable 155 mm Field Artillery unit in history.[citation needed] The 1-39th FA and 3-8th FA were key components of the thrust into Iraq in the first Gulf War, providing fire support for the French Foreign Legion and the 82nd Airborne Division. The 5th Battalion, 8th Field Artillery also served in a major support role for 82d and French troops during the Gulf War. It consisted of three individual batteries. Batteries A and B were Airborne-qualified, while Battery C was air assault. Batteries A and B were assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina and Battery C was assigned to Fort Campbell, Kentucky. All of the battalions were subsequently re-flagged during the years following the Gulf War.

    Task Force 118 had flown the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior off naval vessels during Operation Prime Chance in the 1980s, operating against Iran in the Persian Gulf. It was redesignated the 4th Squadron, 17th Cavalry on 15 January 1991. During the Gulf War of 1991 it was part of the 18th Aviation Brigade.

    Major formations, 1950–2006[edit]

    The 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions have served with the corps since the 1950s. The 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized) was 'reflagged' as the 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized) in April 1996.

    21st century[edit]

    Main article: Transformation of the United States Army

    The Corps headquarters was deployed to Afghanistan from May 2002 – 2003, and became Combined Joint Task Force 180 for the deployment.

    XVIII Airborne Corps was deployed from January 2005 to January 2006 to Baghdad, Iraq, where it served as the Multi-National Corps – Iraq. Following its return, XVIII Airborne Corps and its subordinate units began the process of modernization and reorganization.

    Under the previous Army Chief of Staff's future restructure of the Army, the corps headquarters of the XVIII Airborne Corps will lose its airborne (specifically parachute) certification as a cost-cutting measure—the same will occur to the divisional headquarters of the 82nd Airborne Division. This plan is designed to follow the U.S. Army's restructuring plan to go from being division-based to brigade-based. This will mean that the largest units that will be airborne – specifically parachute certified – will be at the brigade level. Even so, for traditional and historical reasons, the formation will continue to be called the XVIII Airborne Corps.

    The divisions that fall under the XVIII Airborne Corps (as well as the other two corps in the Army) are in a period of transition, shifting from corps control to fall directly under FORSCOM, eliminating the corps status as a middle man. This ties in with the Army's broad modularity plan, as a corps can deploy and support any unit, not just the units subordinate to the corps. The 3d Infantry Division, the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), and the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) have already changed over to direct FORSCOM control. The 82nd Airborne Division will transfer after the division returns from Afghanistan.

    In August 2006, XVIII Airborne Corps traveled to South Korea to participate in Ulchi Focus Lens, a joint training exercise between the Republic of Korea Army and coalition forces stationed there.[44]

    In mid-April, 2007, the Department of the Army confirmed the next OIF deployment schedule, with XVIII Airborne Corps deploying to relieve III Corps as the MNC-I at Camp Victory, Baghdad, Iraq. XVIII Airborne Corps is scheduled to replace III Corps in November, 2007. The corps will deploy along with 1st Armored Division and 4th Infantry Division, as well as 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, and 1st BCT, 82nd Airborne Division.[45]

    On 21 December 2016, Stars and Stripes reported that in August the XVIII Airborne Corps deployed to Iraq for Operation Inherent Resolve, in December this included the XVIII Airborne Corps headquarters and the 1st Special Forces Command, which is deployed as the Special Operations Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve. The 18th Field Artillery Brigade deployed into Iraq with High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems.[46]

    A Canadian Army General has served with the XVIII Corps since 2007.[47]

    Current structure[edit]

    XVIII Corps organization 2021 (click to enlarge)

    XVIII Airborne Corps CSIB.svgXVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg[48]

    • 3rd Infantry Division CSIB.png3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart
    • 10th Mountain Division CSIB.jpg10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum
    • 82nd Airborne Division CSIB.png82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg
    • Combat service identification badge of the 101st Airborne Division.png101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell
    • 3rd Sustainment Command CSIB.jpg3rd Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort Bragg
    • 7SustainBdeSSI.jpg7th Transportation Brigade, Fort Eustis
    • US Army 16th Military Police Brigade CSIB-without tab.png16th Military Police Brigade, Fort Bragg
      • 83rd Civil Affairs Battalion distinctive unit insignia.png 83rd Civil Affairs Battalion, Fort Bragg (Administratively assigned, operationally controlled by XVIII Airborne Corps)
    • 18thFABDENOTAB.png18th Field Artillery Brigade, Fort Bragg
    • 20EngrBdeCSIB.jpg20th Engineer Brigade, Fort Bragg
    • 35th home.jpg35th Signal Brigade, Fort Gordon
    • 44th Medical Command SSI.svg44th Medical Brigade, Fort Bragg
    • 525 BfSB.svg525th Expeditionary Military Intelligence Brigade, Fort Bragg

    Other supporting units:

    Operations[edit]

    The corps has participated in a number of operations since then:

    • Operation Power Pack – Dominican Republic, 1965
    • Operation Urgent Fury – Grenada, 1983
    • Operation Golden Pheasant – Honduras, 1988
    • Operation Nimrod Dancer – Panama, 1989
    • Operation Hawkeye – U.S. Virgin Islands, 1989
    • Operation Just Cause – Panama, 1989
    • Operation Desert Shield – Saudi Arabia, 1990–1991
    • Operation Desert Storm – Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq, 1991
    • Operation GTMO – Cuba, 1991
    • Operation Hurricane Andrew – Florida, 1992
    • Operation Restore Hope – Somalia, 1992
    • Operation Uphold/Maintain Democracy – Haiti, 1994
    • Operation Vigilant Warrior – Kuwait, 1994
    • Operation Joint Forge – Bosnia, 1998
    • Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan, 2002, 2014
    • Operation Iraqi Freedom – Iraq, 2005
    • Operation Iraqi Freedom – Iraq, 2008
    • Operation Unified Response – Haiti, 2010
    • Operation New Dawn – Iraq, 2011
    • Operation Inherent Resolve – Iraq and Syria, 2015–2016

    Notable members[edit]

    • John D. Altenburg, MG – Deputy Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Army.
    • Ralph Eaton, BG – 82nd Airborne Division and XVIII Airborne Corps Chief of Staff.
    • Michael C. Flowers, BG – Commander, Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command.
    • Michael T. Flynn, LTG – 25th National Security Advisor, Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, and ISAF Commander.
    • Charles D. Gemar, LTC – US Astronaut.
    • Teresa King, SGM – First female Commandant of the U.S. Army Drill Sergeant Academy.
    • Gary Luck, GEN - Corps commander and later CG, USFK
    • Stanley A. McChrystal, GEN – ISAF Commander.
    • Raymond T. Odierno, GEN – 38th Army Chief of Staff.
    • James Peake, LTG – Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
    • David Petraeus, GEN – ISAF Commander and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency.
    • Matthew Ridgway, GEN - U.S. Army Chief of Staff
    • David M. Rodriguez, GEN – Commander, U.S. Africa Command and FORSCOM.
    • Arthur D. Simons, COL – Led the Son Tay raid during the Vietnam War.
    • Thomas Tackaberry, LTG - Veteran of World War II, Korea and Vietnam.
    • Michael Tomczyk, CPT – Computer entrepreneur and joint developer of the Commodore VIC-20.
    • Thomas R. Turner II, LTG – Commanding General of United States Army North.
    • James C. Yarbrough, BG – Commander, Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk.
    • Wayne Eyre, GEN – Commander of the Canadian Army and Chief of Defence Staff (acting).[49]

    References[edit]

    1. ^Manternach, Adam (7 October 2019). "XVIII Airborne Corps hosts change of command, welcomes familiar Fort Bragg leader to the helm". Retrieved 25 October 2019.
    2. ^https://home.army.mil/bragg/index.php/units-tenants/xviii-airborne-co
    3. ^ abc"Leadership". Retrieved 8 October 2019.
    4. ^http://www.militaryvetshop.com/History/18thABCorps.html
    5. ^http://www.vii-corps.org/WWII/WWII.htm[permanent dead link]
    6. ^https://www.ww2-airborne.us/18corps/18_overview.html
    7. ^https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/army/xviii-corps.htm
    8. ^Olinger, Mark A. (May–June 2005). "Airlift Operations During the Lebanon Crisis". Army Logistician. 37 (3): 30. Archived from the original on 3 March 2012.
    9. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
    10. ^ abcdefghiArmy - The Magazine of Landpower - October 1989 (1989). "Command and Staff". Association of the US Army. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    11. ^"18th Financial Management Support Center Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    12. ^"1st Battalion, 2nd Air Defense Artillery Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    13. ^ abcde"Field Artillery - February 1990". US Army Field Artillery School. 1990. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    14. ^ abcde"Field Artillery - February 1987". US Army Field Artillery School. 1987. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    15. ^ abcde"Field Artillery - December 1989". US Army Field Artillery School. 1988. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    16. ^ abcdMcKenney, Janice E. "Field Artillery - Army Lineage Series - Part 2"(PDF). US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    17. ^"3rd Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    18. ^ ab"About 18th FA BDE". US Army. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    19. ^McKenney, Janice E. "Field Artillery - Army Lineage Series - Part 2"(PDF). US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    20. ^"1st Battalion, 58th Aviation Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    21. ^Organ, David (15 December 2009). "The Logistics of the 101st Airborne Division in the First Gulf War". Retrieved 17 June 2020.
    22. ^"2nd Battalion, 159th Aviation Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    23. ^"3rd Battalion, 159th Aviation Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    24. ^"Fielding of the Apache". United States Army Aviation Digest - January 1988. 1988. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    25. ^"20th Engineer Brigade Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    26. ^ abcd"20th Engineer Brigade History". 20th Engineer Brigade Staff. Archived from the original on 3 January 2008. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    27. ^"27th Engineer Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    28. ^"37th Engineer Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    29. ^"175th Engineer Company Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    30. ^"264th Engineer Company Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    31. ^"362nd Engineer Company Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    32. ^"503rd Military Police Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    33. ^ abcde"35th Signal Brigade - Unit History". Army Communicator - Voice of the Signal Corps - Fall 1987. 1987. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    34. ^ abcdeRaines, Rebecca Robbins. "Signal Corps"(PDF). US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    35. ^"25th Signal Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    36. ^"50th Signal Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    37. ^"327th Signal Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    38. ^"224th Military Intelligence Battalion". US Army. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
    39. ^"224th Military Intelligence Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    40. ^"319th Military Intelligence Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    41. ^"519th Military Intelligence Battalion Lineage". US Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
    42. ^"XVIII ABC participates in UFL". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 20 April 2007.
    43. ^"DA announces next OIF rotation". Archived from the original on 6 June 2008. Retrieved 19 April 2007.
    44. ^"'We're a significant presence:' General updates Fort Bragg troops on Islamic State fight". military.com. 21 December 2016. Archived from the original on 28 December 2016.
    45. ^https://www.fayobserver.com/news/20180529/canadian-general-ending-two-year-tour-at-fort-bragg
    46. ^XVIII AIRBORNE CORPS, U.S. ARMY FORT BRAGG, home.army.mil, last accessed 31 December 2020
    47. ^https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2021/08/wayne-eyre-promoted-from-the-rank-of-lieutenant-general-to-general-continues-to-act-as-chief-of-the-defence-staff.html

    External links[edit]

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    82nd Airborne Division
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    • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 82nd Airborne Division
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    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XVIII_Airborne_Corps

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