Mac mini 2017 specs

Mac mini 2017 specs DEFAULT

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While it’s been more than four years since the Apple Mac Mini has received a proper update, that doesn’t mean that Apple has forgotten about it. And, this 2018 refresh is proof that this crowd favorite isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

The Apple Mac Mini has been refreshed for the modern age, making it better than ever with impressive bumps in specs. It’s up to five times faster (30 times faster at HEVC encoding) than its 2014 predecessor, thanks to the hexa-core Intel Coffee Lake desktop processor and up to 64GB of RAM inside. It also comes with several connectivity options in the back, including four Thunderbolt 3 ports.

Apple is touting the new Apple Mac Mini as a media creation machine. The question is, is it worth the upgrade, or are you better off with the Mac mini 2020? We’ve taken Apple’s smallest Mac for a spin to see if it’s worth it.

Spec sheet

Here is the Apple Mac mini configuration sent to TechRadar for review:

CPU: 3.6GHz Intel Core i3-8100 (quad-core, 4 threads, 6MB cache)
Graphics: Intel UHD Graphics 630
RAM: 8GB (2,666 MHz DDR4)
Storage: 128GB PCIe SSD
Ports: 4x Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C), 3.5mm headphone jack, 2x USB 3, HDMI 2.0, Gigabit Ethernet
Connectivity: 802.11ac Wi-F, Bluetooth 5.0
Weight: 2.9 pounds (1.3kg)
Size: 7.7 x 7.7 x 1.4 inches (19.7 x 19.7 x 3.6cm; W x D x H)

Price and availability

The Apple Mac mini 2018 starts at $799 (£799, AU$1,249) and tops out at $1,099 (£1,099, AU$1,699) with the preset configurations. If you switch any of the components, the price also change, which gives you some flexibility when it comes to balancing power with budget.

If you plan on utilizing your Mac for creative applications, the new Mac mini is a more affordable route, compared to something like the iMac Pro, which sets you back a whopping $4,999 (£4,899, AU$7,299) for the base model – though if you do have a lot of cash to shell out and you require a ton of power for things like video edting, we'd wait until the new Mac Pro 2019 rolls out in Fall 2019 starting at $5,999.

More interested in the Mac mini as a small PC? Then nearest rival is arguably the Intel Hades Canyon NUC, which is a powerful, yet bareboned, mini PC that runs either Windows or Linux, and costs $999 (about £710, AU$1,302). 

This makes the Mac mini look like a bargain, especially when you consider that you’ll have to buy memory, storage and the OS separately for the NUC, adding additional expense, though you don’t need to pay for Linux, obviously.

Design

Fans of the compact, no-nonsense designs of previous Mac minis will be happy to learn that the new Mac mini inherits the same small, square-ish metal design that measures 7.7 x 7.7 x 1.4 inches (19.7 x 19.7 x 3.6cm) and weighs slightly heavier than the last Mac Mini at 2.9 pounds (1.3kg), compared to the older Mac mini’s weight of 2.6 pounds (1.19kg).

Within the same dimensions, the Mac mini affords a more powerful hardware than ever before, thanks to a redesigned thermal architecture that features a bigger fan, expanded vents and an overhauled power supply.

Apple has made some small changes to the Mac mini’s design – it now comes in the same Space Grey as the iMac Pro, though it’s the only color option this time around. Apple also asserts that the new Mac mini is made of 60% post-consumer plastic, mostly in the base, with the chassis made from 100% recycled aluminum.

The move to a PCIe solid state drive (SSD) for storage doesn’t just make the Mac mini faster. It means that it runs cooler and quieter as well – essential for a small form-factor PC.

Ports-wise, the Apple Mac mini (2018) comes with four Thunderbolt 3 USB-C ports, an HDMI 2.0 port, two USB-A ports, audio jack and Gigabit Ethernet, alongside a 10Gb Ethernet option. On the back corner, there’s a power button as well as the increasingly rare (for Apple products, at least) 3.5mm headphone jack.

With only one HDMI port, you'll have to either upgrade to a Thunderbolt 3 monitor or make do with an adapter if you want to connect to more than one monitor. Since the Mac mini is built as a creator's tool, multiple monitors are often a must, so many users will have to buy additional peripherals.

On the upside, with Thunderbolt 3 you'll be able to run two 4K displays at once and still have two ports leftover – maybe one for an external graphics card (eGPU) solution, which the Apple Mac mini (2018) supports. As per usual, the keyboard and mouse aren't included, so there's another two accessories to factor into your budget.

All these ports are kept at the back of the Mac mini for a minimalist look and to keep the wires from sprawling all over the place.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but the Apple Mac Mini isn’t easily upgradeable, unlike mini PCs like the Intel NUC or Zotac ZBox range. This means when the Mac Mini starts to show its age, you won’t be able to open it up and throw in more powerful components – besides the memory.

For anyone transitioning from a PC environment where upgradability is essential, this will be frustrating. For anyone used to Apple’s way of doing things, it won’t be too surprising.

There’s also a few things Apple has done to mitigate the user’s inability to easily upgrade. First of all, you’re able to configure the Apple Mac mini (2018) quite extensively, allowing you to upgrade various components before you make that purchase to make sure that you get a Mac mini that best suits your needs and budget.

It’s also worth noting that thanks to the modern technology in the Apple Mac mini, you should hopefully not feel the need to upgrade for a while, which – considering the gap between Mac mini releases these days – may be for the best.

Overall, we’re content that Apple has maintained the small form factor of the Mac mini while filling it with more powerful components and a good number of ports. Creatives that require multiple monitors, however, may want to reconsider due to the single HDMI port and lack of any DisplayPorts.

The Space Gray color looks great, as it does on other Apple products, and the 100% recycled aluminium case is a welcome environment-friendly effort, which also keeps the Mac mini feeling sturdy and robust.

Benchmarks

Here’s how the Apple Mac mini (2018) performed in our suite of benchmark tests:

Cinebench CPU: 587 points;
Graphics: 40.75 fps
Geekbench 4 Single-Core: 4,733;
Multi-Core: 14,447

Performance

The new Mac Mini has desktop-grade 8th-generation Intel Coffee Lake processors that come in quad- and hexa-core models, so we had high hopes for its computing power. The new square shaped desktop delivers five times the amount of performance over its predecessor, at least according to Apple.

Because the Mac Mini is aimed at creatives who typically count on processor- and graphics-intensive software and editing large files, the 2018 Mac Mini needs to be able to keep pace, more so than any previous version.

The quad- and hexa-core Intel Core processors with Turbo Boost speeds of up to 4.6GHz and support for up to 2,666MHz (which is four times what the last Mac Mini could hold) will definitely keep the 2018 Mac mini fast and responsive for most demanding tasks, and allow it to handle multiple tasks at once, thanks to the solid amount of memory on offer.

The latest Mac mini comes with the Apple T2 security chip, which comes with an SSD controller with on-the-fly data encryption for "industry-leading security." The T2 chip also boasts HEVC video transcoding that's up to 30 times faster, which is great news for video editors who might be interested in using an Apple Mac mini for their creative work.

The only place the Apple Mac mini (2018) is a let down, specs-wise, is with the Intel UHD 630 integrated graphics. We would much rather see some form of discrete graphics. Anyone utilizing the Apple Mac mini for graphically-intensive creative work, such as incorporating video editing software and 3D modeling, may find the integrated graphics considerably limiting and time-consuming.

On the other hand, those looking for a boost in performance on this front can always plug in an eGPU.

We tested just how flexible the Mac mini (2018) is with a Black Magic eGPU plugged in. Editing raw 4K video files and adding effects on the fly in Final Cut is impressively smooth for such a diminutive machine. Of course, the external graphics card is still doing a lot of heavy lifting, but it’s still a good indication of the potential the new Mac mini has for creative work.

Apple also showed us an interesting setup where a single Mac mini (2018) was connected via a network switch to a network cluster of five Mac minis (piled on top of each other). By putting the 10Gb Ethernet port on the Mac mini (if you choose that option when purchasing the Mac mini) to good use, you can offload intensive processes (such as rendering video) to these other Mac minis. The process of doing this is impressively simple in Final Cut – it’s a matter of opening up a menu and selecting the attached Mac minis.

Once setup, the tasks are completed by the other Mac minis, while the main one may be utilized for other tasks without any noticeable impact on performance. Perhaps most impressively, the stack of five Mac minis remains pretty quiet, even when working on those intensive tasks. For anyone who has used multiple PCs at once for complex projects and had to put up with the sound of fans blasting off, this is definitely a welcome solution.

Of course, there won’t be many people who will be using a pile of Mac minis like that, but it’s a good demonstration of how versatile the new Mac mini is.

We are really impressed with how the new Mac mini feels fast and responsive when running macOS 10.14 Mojave in day-to-day use. Apps open and close instantaneously, and even more challenging processes, such as video transcoding, are accomplished quickly, not to mention silently.

What we really like about this new Mac mini is that Apple has designed a powerful and versatile mini PC that’s compact enough for effortless transport or to be hidden out of view behind a display.

In our benchmarking, the Mac mini doesn’t quite hit the highs of professional-grade Apple devices such as the MacBook Pro or iMac Pro, but it still performs beautifully, especially in the multi-core tests thanks to that quad-core Intel processor. If you go for the Mac mini configuration with a hexa-core processor, expect even better results.

It’s also worth remembering that the Mac mini is less expensive than either of those other devices, even when you factor in the peripherals (monitor, mouse and keyboard) you might need to purchase for it.

Compared to the previous generation of Mac mini, there’s no competition: this year’s Mac mini blows it out of the water, performance-wise. If you love your Mac mini and have been waiting for an upgrade, then you’re going to be very pleased with the new Mac mini.

Verdict

Many of us have been hoping for a follow-up to the popular Mac mini for years now, so we couldn’t hold back our excitement when the Cupertino company finally announced the new Mac mini earlier in 2018. However, this isn’t just an afterthought or a quick and dirty update to keep the more vocal Mac mini fanatics happy.

Instead, we’ve got a substantially overhauled Mac mini that, in many ways, goes far beyond what we had been hoping for. This is a very accomplished little machine that packs some brilliant new features and components for a level of performance that puts many other small form-factor PCs to shame.

Apple has acknowledged that the computing landscape has changed since the last Mac mini was released. Back then, the Mac mini was designed with casual users in mind and as an accessible device to win over people from Windows.

With the rise of laptops and the entry-level MacBook now acting as that crossover device, Apple has pitched the Mac mini towards creatives and professionals. 

That might sound crazy, but you know what? It works. This is an excellent little machine in its own right, but pair it with an eGPU (or even a few extra Mac minis) and you’ve got yourself a powerful machine for heavy-duty tasks. By being scalable in this way, as well as allowing you to use your own monitor and peripherals, you’ve also got a very flexible device.

It’s also very competitively priced next to other small form factor computers that offer similar levels of performance. We waited a long time for an updated Mac mini, and the Mac mini 2018 has definitely been worth that wait.

First reviewed November 2018

Image Credit: TechRadar

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Senior Computing editor

Matt (Twitter) is TechRadar's Senior Computing editor. Having written for a number of magazines and websites, there's no aspect of technology that Matt isn't passionate about, especially computing and PC gaming. If you're encountering a problem or need some advice with your PC or Mac, drop him a line on Twitter.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/apple-mac-mini-review

Mac mini (Late 2014) - Technical Specifications

Processor

  • 1.4GHz
    1.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 2.7GHz) with 3MB on-chip shared L3 cache
  • 2.6GHz
    2.6GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz) with 3MB on-chip shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.5GHz) with 4MB on-chip shared L3 cache.
  • 2.8GHz
    2.8GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 3.3GHz) with 3MB on-chip shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.5GHz) with 4MB on-chip shared L3 cache.

Storage1

  • 1.4GHz
    500GB (5400-rpm) hard drive
    Configurable to 1TB Fusion Drive.
  • 2.6GHz
    1TB (5400-rpm) hard drive
    Configurable to 1TB Fusion Drive or 256GB of flash storage (SSD).
  • 2.8GHz
    1TB Fusion Drive
    Configurable to 2TB Fusion Drive or 256GB, 512GB or 1TB of flash storage (SSD).

Memory

  • 1.4GHz
    4GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 memory
    Configurable to 8GB or 16GB.
  • 2.6GHz
    8GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 memory
    Configurable to 16GB.
  • 2.8GHz
    8GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 memory
    Configurable to 16GB.

Graphics

  • 1.4GHz
    Intel HD Graphics 5000
  • 2.6GHz
    Intel Iris Graphics
  • 2.8GHz
    Intel Iris Graphics

Size

  • Height: 1.4 inches (3.6 cm)
  • Width: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)
  • Depth: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)

Weight2

  • 1.4GHz
    2.6 pounds (1.19 kg)
  • 2.6GHz
    2.6 pounds (1.20 kg)
  • 2.8GHz
    2.7 pounds (1.22 kg)

Video Support

  • Support for up to two displays at 2560 by 1600 pixels, both at millions of colors
  • Thunderbolt digital video output
    • Native Mini DisplayPort output
    • DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter (sold separately)
    • VGA output using Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter (sold separately)
    • Dual-link DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter (sold separately)
  • HDMI video output
    • Support for 1080p resolution at up to 60Hz
    • Support for 3840-by-2160 resolution at 30Hz
    • Support for 4096-by-2160 resolution at 24Hz
  • DVI output using HDMI to DVI Adapter (sold separately)

Audio

  • Audio line in minijack (digital/analog)
  • Audio line out/3.5 mm headphone jack (digital/analog)
  • HDMI port supports multichannel audio output
  • Support for Apple iPhone headset with microphone
  • Built-in speaker

Connections and Expansions
 

  • Two Thunderbolt 2 ports (up to 20 Gbps)
  • Four USB 3 ports (up to 5 Gbps)
  • HDMI port
  • SDXC card slot
  • Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Audio in port
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack
  • IR receiver

Communications

  • Wi-Fi
    802.11ac Wi-Fi wireless networking; IEEE 802.11a/g/b/n compatible
  • Bluetooth
    Bluetooth 4.0 wireless technology
  • Ethernet
    10/100/1000BASE-T Ethernet (RJ-45 connector)

Electrical and Operating Requirements

  • Line voltage: 100-240V AC
  • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz, single phase
  • Maximum continuous power: 85W
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
  • Storage temperature: -40° to 116° F (-40° to 47° C)
  • Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
  • Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
  • Typical acoustical performance: Sound pressure level (operator position): 12dBA at idle3

In the Box

Operating System

macOS
macOS is the operating system that powers everything you do on a Mac. macOS Mojave brings new features inspired by its most powerful users, but designed for everyone. So you can get more out of every click. Learn more about latest operating system

Accessibility

Accessibility features help people with disabilities get the most out of their new Mac mini. With built-in support for vision, hearing, physical and motor skills, and learning and literacy, you can create and do amazing things. Learn more about Accessibility

Features include:

  • VoiceOver
  • Zoom
  • Increase Contrast
  • Reduce Motion
  • Siri and Dictation
  • Switch Control
  • Closed Captions
  • Text to Speech

Built-in Apps4

  • Photos
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Pages
  • Numbers
  • Keynote
  • Siri
  • Safari
  • Mail
  • FaceTime
  • Messages
  • Maps
  • News
  • Stocks
  • Home
  • Voice Memos
  • Notes
  • Calendar
  • Contacts
  • Reminders
  • Photo Booth
  • Preview
  • iTunes
  • Books
  • App Store
  • Time Machine

Configure to Order

Configure your Mac mini with these options, only at the Apple Online Store.

  • 1.4GHz
    • 8GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 16GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 1TB Fusion Drive
    • Apple Remote
  • 2.6GHz
    • 16GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processor
    • 1TB Fusion Drive
    • 256GB flash storage (SSD)
    • Apple Remote
  • 2.8GHz
    • 16GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processor
    • 2TB Fusion Drive
    • 256GB flash storage (SSD)
    • 512GB flash storage (SSD)
    • 1TB flash storage (SSD)
    • Apple Remote

Mac mini and the Environment

Apple takes a complete product life cycle approach to determining our environmental impact. Learn more about Mac mini and the Environment

Mac mini is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:

  • BFR-free
  • PVC-free5
  • Highly recyclable aluminum enclosure
  • Meets ENERGY STAR 6.1 requirements
  • Rated EPEAT Gold6

Apple and the Environment
Learn more about Apple’s dedication to reducing the environmental impact of our products and process. Or read our Product Environmental Reports for detailed information on the environmental performance of every Apple product.

Apple GiveBack
Letting go of your old Mac is easy with Apple GiveBack. If it’s in good shape, you can trade it in for Apple Store credit. If it’s not eligible for credit, we’ll recycle it responsibly at no cost to you. Good for you. Good for the planet.
See how it works

Acoustic Performance

Declared noise emission values in accordance with ECMA-109

 Sound Power Level
A,m (B)
Sound Pressure Level
Operator Position
A,m (dB)
Idle1.90 (= 0.25)12.0
Wireless web1.90 (= 0.25)11.5
Hard drive seek1.95 (= 0.25)12.0
  1. A,m is the mean A-weighted sound power level, rounded to the nearest 0.05 B.
  2. A,m is the mean A-weighted sound pressure level measured at the operator position (rounded to the nearest 0.5 dB).
  3. 1 B (bel) = 10 dB (decibel)
  4. v is the statistical adder for computing upper-limit of A-weighted sound power level.
  5. The quantity, A,c (formerly called Ad) may be computed from the sum of A,m and .
  6. The Wireless web test browses 25 popular websites.
  7. Configuration tested: 2.8GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor, 8GB memory, 1TB Fusion Drive, Intel Iris graphics.

Accessories

Wireless

  • Magic Keyboard
  • Magic Mouse 2
  • Magic Trackpad 2

Mac Software

  • Logic Pro X
  • Final Cut Pro X

Displays and Graphics

  • Apple HDMI to DVI Adapter
  • Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter
  • Apple Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter
  • Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter

Other Accessories

  • Apple USB SuperDrive
  • AppleCare+ for Mac

  1. 1GB = 1 billion bytes and 1TB = 1 trillion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.
  2. Weight varies by configuration and manufacturing process.
  3. Acoustics measured from typical operator position sitting in front of standard Mac mini system. Acoustics may vary by configuration.
  4. iMovie, GarageBand, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote are available on the Mac App Store. Downloading apps requires an Apple ID and a device that is compatible with the OS version required for each app.
  5. PVC-free AC power cord available in all regions except India and South Korea.
  6. Mac mini achieved a Gold rating from EPEAT in the U.S. and Canada.
Sours: https://support.apple.com/kb/sp710
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Mac mini Technical Specifications

Apple M1 chip

  • 8-core CPU with 4 performance cores and 4 efficiency cores
  • 8-core GPU
  • 16-core Neural Engine

Simultaneously supports up to two displays:

  • One display with up to 6K resolution at 60Hz connected via Thunderbolt and one display with up to 4K resolution at 60Hz connected via HDMI 2.0

Thunderbolt 3 digital video output supports

  • Native DisplayPort output over USB‑C
  • Thunderbolt 2, DVI, and VGA output supported using adapters (sold separately)

HDMI 2.0 display video output

  • Support for one display with up to 4K resolution at 60Hz
  • DVI output using HDMI to DVI Adapter (sold separately)
  • Built-in speaker
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack
  • HDMI 2.0 port supports multichannel audio output

Ethernet

Thunderbolt /
USB 4

HDMI 2.0

USB-A

3.5 mm
headphone
jack

3.5 mm
headphone
jack

Two Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports with support for:

  • DisplayPort
  • Thunderbolt 3 (up to 40Gb/s)
  • USB 4 (up to 40Gb/s)
  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 (up to 10Gb/s)
  • Thunderbolt 2, HDMI, DVI, and VGA supported using adapters (sold separately)
  • Two USB-A ports (up to 5Gb/s)
  • HDMI 2.0 port
  • Gigabit Ethernet port (configurable to 10Gb Ethernet)
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack

Wi-Fi

  • 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 wireless networking
  • IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n/ac compatible

Bluetooth

  • Bluetooth 5.0 wireless technology

Ethernet

  • 10/100/1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet (RJ-45 connector)
    Configurable to 10Gb Ethernet (Nbase-T Ethernet with support for 1Gb, 2.5Gb, 5Gb, and 10Gb Ethernet using RJ-45 connector)

Height: 1.4 inches (3.6 cm)

Width: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)

Depth: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)

Weight: 2.6 pounds (1.2 kg)

Height:: 1.4 inches (3.6 cm)Width:: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)Depth:: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)Weight:: 2.6 pounds (1.2 kg)

Line voltage:
100–240V AC

Frequency:
50Hz to 60Hz, single phase

Maximum continuous power:
150W

Operating temperature:
50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)

Storage temperature:
–40° to 116° F (–40° to 47° C)

Relative humidity:
5% to 90% noncondensing

Operating altitude:
tested up to 16,400 feet (5000 meters)

Typical acoustical performance:
Sound pressure level (operator position): 5 dBA at idle

Your Mac mini comes with 90 days of complimentary technical support and a one-year limited warranty. Purchase AppleCare+ for Mac to extend your coverage from your AppleCare+ purchase date and add up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage every 12 months, each subject to a service fee of $99 for external enclosure damage, or $299 for other repairable damage, plus applicable tax.

macOS

macOS is the most advanced desktop operating system in the world. macOS Big Sur introduces a bold new design and major updates to apps — taking macOS to a new level of power and beauty.

Learn more

Accessibility features help people with disabilities get the most out of their new Mac mini. With built-in support for vision, hearing, mobility, and learning, you can create and do amazing things.

Learn more

Features include:

  • Voice Control
  • VoiceOver
  • Zoom
  • Increase Contrast
  • Reduce Motion
  • Siri and Dictation
  • Switch Control
  • Closed Captions
  • Text to Speech

Configure your Mac mini with these options, only at apple.com:

  • 16GB unified memory
  • 512GB, 1TB, or 2TB SSD
  • 10Gb Ethernet

Mac mini is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:

See the Mac mini Product Environmental Report

Made with better materials

  • 100% recycled aluminum in the enclosure
  • 100% recycled tin in the solder of the main logic board
  • 35% or more recycled plastic in multiple components

Smarter chemistry

  • Mercury-free
  • BFR-, PVC-, and beryllium-free

Green manufacturing

  • Apple’s Zero Waste Program helps suppliers eliminate waste sent to landfill
  • All final assembly supplier sites are transitioning to 100% renewable energy for Apple production

Responsible packaging

  • 100% of virgin wood fiber comes from responsibly managed forests
  • Recyclable, majority-fiber packaging

Apple and the Environment

We’re committed to making our products without taking from the earth, and to become carbon neutral across our entire business, including products, by 2030.

See Apple’s commitment

Apple Trade In

Trade in your eligible device for credit toward your next purchase, or get an Apple Gift Card you can use anytime. If your device isn’t eligible for credit, we’ll recycle it for free.

Learn more about apple trade in

6-Core

  • 3.0GHz 6-core Intel Core i5
  • Turbo Boost up to 4.1GHz
  • 9MB shared L3 cache

Configurable to:

6-Core

  • 3.2GHz 6-core Intel Core i7
  • Turbo Boost up to 4.6GHz
  • 12MB shared L3 cache

8GB

  • of 2666MHz DDR4 SO-DIMM memory

Configurable to:

Support for the following combination of maximum concurrent display setups:

  • Up to three displays:
  • Two displays with 4096-by-2304 resolution at 60Hz connected via Thunderbolt 3 plus one display with 4096-by-2160 resolution at 60Hz connected via HDMI 2.0
  • or
  • Up to two displays:
  • One display with 5120-by-2880 resolution at 60Hz connected via Thunderbolt 3 plus one display with 4096-by-2160 resolution at 60Hz connected via HDMI 2.0

Thunderbolt 3 digital video output supports

  • Native DisplayPort output over USB‑C
  • Thunderbolt 2, DVI, and VGA output supported using adapters (sold separately)

HDMI 2.0 display video output

  • Support for one display with 4096-by-2160 resolution at 60Hz
  • DVI output using HDMI to DVI Adapter (sold separately)
  • Built-in speaker
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack
  • HDMI 2.0 port supports multichannel audio output

Ethernet

Thunderbolt 3
(USB-C)

HDMI 2.0

USB-A

3.5 mm
headphone
jack

3.5 mm
headphone
jack

Four Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports with support for:

  • DisplayPort
  • Thunderbolt 3 (up to 40Gb/s)
  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 (up to 10Gb/s)
  • Thunderbolt 2, HDMI, DVI, and VGA supported using adapters (sold separately)
  • Two USB-A ports (up to 5Gb/s)
  • HDMI 2.0 port
  • Gigabit Ethernet port (configurable to 10Gb Ethernet)
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack

Wi-Fi

  • 802.11ac Wi-Fi wireless networking
  • IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n compatible

Bluetooth

  • Bluetooth 5.0 wireless technology

Ethernet

  • 10/100/1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet (RJ-45 connector)
  • Configurable to 10Gb Ethernet (Nbase-T Ethernet with support for 1Gb, 2.5Gb, 5Gb, and 10Gb Ethernet using RJ-45 connector)

Height: 1.4 inches (3.6 cm)

Width: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)

Depth: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)

Weight: 2.9 pounds (1.3 kg)

Height:: 1.4 inches (3.6 cm)Width:: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)Depth:: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)Weight:: 2.9 pounds (1.3 kg)

Line voltage:
100–240V AC

Frequency:
50Hz to 60Hz, single phase

Maximum continuous power:
150W

Operating temperature:
50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)

Storage temperature:
–40° to 116° F (–40° to 47° C)

Relative humidity:
5% to 90% noncondensing

Operating altitude:
tested up to 16,400 feet (5000 meters)

Typical acoustical performance:
Sound pressure level (operator position): 5 dBA at idle

Your Mac mini comes with 90 days of complimentary technical support and a one-year limited warranty. Purchase AppleCare+ for Mac to extend your coverage from your AppleCare+ purchase date and add up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage every 12 months, each subject to a service fee of $99 for external enclosure damage, or $299 for other repairable damage, plus applicable tax.

macOS

macOS is the most advanced desktop operating system in the world. macOS Big Sur introduces a bold new design and major updates to apps — taking macOS to a new level of power and beauty.

Learn more

Accessibility features help people with disabilities get the most out of their new Mac mini. With built-in support for vision, hearing, mobility, and learning, you can create and do amazing things.

Learn more

Features include:

  • Voice Control
  • VoiceOver
  • Zoom
  • Increase Contrast
  • Reduce Motion
  • Siri and Dictation
  • Switch Control
  • Closed Captions
  • Text to Speech

Configure your Mac mini with these options, only at apple.com:

  • 3.2GHz 6-core Intel Core i7 processor
  • 16GB, 32GB, or 64GB 2666MHz DDR4 memory
  • 1TB or 2TB SSD
  • 10Gb Ethernet

Mac mini is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:

  • BFR-free
  • PVC-free
  • Beryllium-free
  • 100% recycled aluminum enclosure
  • Eco-friendly packaging
  • ENERGY STAR® certified
  • Rated EPEAT Gold

Apple and the Environment

Read our Product Environmental Reports for detailed information on the environmental performance of every Apple product.

Product Environmental Reports

Apple Trade In

Letting go of your old Mac is easy. If it’s in good shape, you can trade it in for Apple Store credit. If it’s not eligible for credit, we’ll recycle it responsibly at no cost to you. Good for you. Good for the planet.

Learn more about apple trade in

Sours: https://www.apple.com/mac-mini/specs/
Mac Mini 2018: Price, specifications and features - Apple Launch Event

Apple Mac mini 2018 review: the mini gets mighty and pricey

For years, the Mac mini has been the black sheep of Apple’s computer lineup. It’s not the preferred workstation of graphic designers or video editors. That’s the iMac. And it’s never been the versatile product of choice for the coder class, the modern office worker, or the well-off college student. That’s the MacBook line. But the Mac mini has always had a special place in the hearts of Apple fans. I would know. I’ve been using a Mac mini as my primary home computer for the last half-decade, and I love it for its simplicity and the tiny corner of real estate it takes up on my desk.

But that’s precisely what makes evaluating the newest iteration of Apple’s smallest desktop computer so difficult. The Mac mini has historically been the budget option Mac for consumers who lived in Apple’s ecosystem, but liked the aesthetics of mini PCs, as well as the benefits of a full mouse, keyboard, and monitor setup. You could of course just buy an iMac, or a display stand for a MacBook Air or Pro. But the Mac mini was simple, it was cheap, and it did its job well. So well, in fact, that it took on a second life for many owners as a home media PC, a NAS server, and even as part of a compute cluster.

But the 2018 Mac mini is a different beast. It is much more powerful — it is, without hyperbole, a miniature Mac Pro — and as a result, it is no longer all that cheap. In fact, Apple’s cheapest Mac has moved from a sub-$500 purchase to a $799 one, and much more if you want a larger solid state drive, a faster processor, or more memory. You can spec out a lowly Mac mini all the way up to $4,199 if you really desire. (This time around the RAM is user replaceable, while the SSD is not.)

So the important questions now are whether the new Mac mini justifies its higher price, and even in the event it does, whether it offers enough value for the right kind of consumer to still be considered a viable budget option. After all, costing pretty much the same amount of money as a Mac laptop, with its built-in display and keyboard, is a much different value proposition than a Mac that used to cost half as much as the next most expensive Apple computer.

Good Stuff

  • Huge boost to speed and power
  • Sleek space grey finish
  • Excellent port selection

Bad Stuff

  • More expensive base model
  • Lacking GPU performance
  • Tough sell for your average Mac user

Buy for $799.00 from Apple

The most obvious judgement you can make about the new Mac mini is that Apple has smartly retained the design in its entirety. The company didn’t reinvent the wheel in an effort to sell you a space-age-looking computer. It’s the same old Mac mini, in the familiar frame, but with a new and attractive space gray finish. It is essentially the same weight — it’s put on a couple of ounces — with the same dimensions as the 2014 model. On the back, you have an all-new port layout: four Thunderbolt 3 USB-C ports, two USB 3.0 ports, and one HDMI 2.0 port. You also get a 3.5mm headphone jack and an Ethernet jack.

For configurations, you have two options: the not-so-powerful i3 version costing $799, or the decently powerful i5 version starting at $1,099. Choosing between the two, or shelling out for the optional i7, is the hardest and priciest choice you’re going to have to make because you will not be able to upgrade that component whatsoever. The only other difference between the two configurations is that the cheaper model starts at 128GB of flash storage, while the i5 model comes with 256GB.

There are some ways to help make this choice easier. If you know you’re not going to need a large amount of storage — in other words, you’re not editing video on this thing or using it as a media server — you can spring for the $799 base model and spend that extra cash on an upgrade to an i7. That’s a smart move in my book, and it will give the device more speed and mileage in the long run.

You can of course pay to upgrade both the RAM and the SSD in small chunks, up to 64GB of memory and 2TB of storage. Both upgrades will cost you heavily, with only the RAM being really worth springing for now rather than later, because of how finicky Macs can be when using aftermarket memory. Storage constraints, on the other hand, can always be better managed with external drives.

I’m currently writing this review on the i7 model, with 32GB of RAM and 1TB of storage, and almost everything about this $2,499 machine feels like overkill. It is dead quiet during the most intensive of tasks, like editing 4K video while concurrently running memory-hogging applications like Chrome, Slack, TweetDeck, and my preferred web Gmail wrapper Wavebox. And it’s been lightning fast in every other regard, choking up only when exporting a 4K file in Adobe Premiere Pro while keeping quite a few other apps open and running simultaneously. And even then, it became only a bit sluggish, and I never experienced a single app crash or even a pinwheel.

Naturally, the new Mac mini outperforms the 2014 model in every single available metric, and it holds its own against mid- to high-tier MacBook Pro and iMac models from this year and last. For instance, we were able to export a five-minute 4K video with Premiere in a little under 15 minutes, which came to around 17 percent slower than the same exporting process performed on our 2017 iMac with its 32GB of RAM and an even faster i7. (The iMac is bolstered by its discrete Radeon GPU, while the Mac mini relies solely on Intel’s integrated graphics.)

Plus, because the new Mac mini has Apple’s T2 security chip, which also acts as a co-processor, the computer gets a huge boost in SSD performance for reading / writing of files and in the event you’re compiling code. If you want Turbo Boost or hyperthreading, you’re going to need to shell out for the i5 processor or the i7, respectively. Having not tested the base i3 model, I can’t definitively say whether all that extra juice is absolutely necessary to replicate what this machine does best, which I believe is still mid-tier Mac performance in an affordable desktop package. But not having experienced a single hiccup outside 4K video exporting is undeniably a result of the monstrous amount of CPU and memory I’ve been using on my test machine.

With regard to ports, I can’t say enough for how pleasant it is to have a computer properly outfitted with the all necessary ports I use. The new Mac mini can power up to three displays, including two ultrawide 4K displays via ThunderBolt 3 and one standard 4K monitor through HDMI, or one 5K display and one standard 4K. Those ports also open up all sorts of possibilities for graphics enclosures, external solid state drives, and so on. But just for day-to-day use, having two USB 3.0 and four USB-C ports means you’ll never need the same cumbersome dongle adapter you’d require if you were simply docking a MacBook Air or Pro to a standalone monitor.

This might normally be the place where I’d circle back to performance and tout the benchmark metrics and show off the bar charts, like the fact that the Mac mini has the second-highest single-core Geekbench 4 result, behind only the mid-2017 iMac with a quad-core i7. (It gets smoked by the iMac Pro in multi-core CPU benchmark testing and on GPU compute, but even the i5 version of the Mac mini can hold its own against the most kitted out MacBook Pro you can buy.)

And sure, this computer is a very powerful little machine if you want to run all the numbers, and those willing to push it to its limits as a proper iMac replacement will certainly be pleased with the performance. Also, the new Mac mini is now currently the only desktop Mac, besides the 5K iMac, that can output to an external 5K monitor using just a single cable. So if you’re in the market for one of those and have your preferred peripherals ready to go, there is no real reason to shell out for an iMac over this new Mac mini unless you really want an all-in-one machine, or you’re especially concerned about needing the extra graphics performance.

But the power of the Mac mini is secondary to the bigger-picture questions: who is this thing for at this point, and how much value can you get out of it over a comparable MacBook or iMac without spending thousands of dollars on upgrades?

For most people, the old Mac mini became a cost-effective way to use macOS without feeling forced into a pricey iMac or MacBook Pro, and it was especially attractive for the class of worker whose office computer tended to be a MacBook Air. The Mac mini let you keep iMessage on your desktop, while providing just enough power and versatility to perform light video and photo editing and manage home files and media, all while providing a clean and uncluttered place to work and browse the web. You could keep all your Mac apps synced in the cloud, which allows you to move from a laptop to a home desktop with ease. The 2014 Mac mini was, and arguably still is, a great companion desktop for those on a budget.

The 2018 Mac mini does all of that and more. Those looking to upgrade from the 2014 model will be plenty pleased with how much more superior this device is. Although there is one big caveat: I personally would probably find myself on the fence upgrading my own machine if not for already owning the necessary peripherals to unbox the machine, plug in, and be ready to go in minutes.

If you need to outfit an entire workstation, you’re looking at anywhere from $50 to $250 for a mouse and keyboard, depending on the quality, and then another few hundred dollars at minimum for a monitor. Add that all up and it becomes a $1,200 to $1,500 purchase with just the base model, and that’s on the low end. If you’re going to pair this thing with a 4K or 5K monitor, let alone more than one, then you’re pushing well into the multi-thousand dollar range. Add to that an additional $300 for the faster processor and $200 for each RAM and SSD upgrade. At that point, it’s fair to look at the iMac as a better, more hassle-free deal.

It’s also not exactly a do-everything machine for professionals. The Mac mini’s versatility depends on your needs. If you’re someone who does more intensive GPU-specific work, like video editing, you may want to shell out for a more outfitted MacBook Pro or an iMac. The Mac mini’s GPU is lacking, due to its small frame requiring an Intel-made CPU-GPU pair. (It’s a shame Apple didn’t go with AMD’s integrated Vega M graphics, the same in Intel’s NUC 8, when it easily could have achieved near full-size GPU performance with it.) That said, an eGPU setup is a possible solution to that issue. Apple support on that front is better than ever, while the Mac mini’s small frame frees up some space on your desk for a proper graphics enclosure.

Putting aside the more niche graphics concerns, the bigger question mark looming over the new Mac mini is whether it can still serve the needs of budget Mac users while also fulfilling Apple’s desired vision of it as a professional-grade “workhorse,” as it’s marketed on the company’s website. The answer is a definitive no, it would seem. It’s safe to say this computer is no longer “budget” by any reasonable definition of the word. It’s only a “budget” Apple product because it starts out a few hundred dollars less than the company’s flagship iPhone, and because it’s the only Mac you can buy brand-new that carries a three-digit price tag.

Once upon a time, the Mac mini was a way to get Apple’s desktop software on the cheap, if you only cared really about browsing the web, managing files and media, and enjoying the cross-platform benefits of using macOS and iOS. The new Mac mini demands you treat it like a proper computer, with a price to match, and that will understandably push some percentage of old mini owners toward settling for a Chromebook or simply an iPad for most at-home computing needs.

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t buy this machine, especially if you really do want a clean and uncluttered home workstation with a full mouse and keyboard setup. This device is powerful, compact, and everything a power user would want the Mac mini to be. Plus, it gives you the freedom to buy the peripherals you want at the price you’re comfortable with, so long as you’re okay starting at that $799 base price and shelling out for more speed, memory, and storage. For a certain type of Mac user, myself included, the new Mac mini strikes a solid balance. But it’s no longer the budget machine so many fell in love with.

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Sours: https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/16/18097117/apple-mac-mini-2018-review-upgrade-faster-more-powerful-features-price

2017 mac specs mini

The Mac mini is Apple’s smallest desktop Mac. It may not be as fast as Apple’s other desktop computers—the iMac and the Mac Pro—but it remains fast enough for general-purpose use, and even for pro apps.

The Mac mini not only appeals to first-time Mac users, but longtime Mac users like the price and use the Mac mini as a server or an entertainment Mac connected to a TV. Its small footprint allows it to be used it unique situations.

This article provides the information you need to know about the Mac mini. Read on to learn more about Apple’s smallest desktop Mac.

Editor’s note: Updated 6/19/21 with recent rumors about the next Mac mini.

The latest: Smaller, faster model coming soon

A recent report by Jon Prosser claims that the next Mac mini will be less than an inch tall. Apple could also replace the aluminum chassis with a “plexiglass” top, and the underside will have a pair of horizontal rubber strips instead of a circular rubber pad.

In an earlier report, Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman reported that Apple could be updating the high-end Mac mini, replacing the Intel CPU with its own silicon with a 10-core CPU (eight performance cores and two efficiency cores), 16 or 32 graphics core options, and a maximum of 64GB of memory. This new Mac mini would also have four Thunderbolt/USB-4 ports, up from the two on the $699 M1 Mac mini. Gurman noted that this Mac mini’s release could be delayed or canceled.

We have a separate article that tracks the rumors of the upcoming Mac mini.

Mac mini: Models and specifications

Apple sells three Mac mini standard configuration models.

$699: Apple 8-core M1 CPU, 8GB of memory, 256GB SSD storage, integrated Apple 8-core GPU, two Thunderbolt 3/USB 4 ports, up to 6K video resolution with one display via Thunderbolt

$899: Apple 8-core M1 CPU, 8GB of memory, 512GB SSD storage, integrated Apple 8-core GPU, two Thunderbolt 3/USB 4 ports, up to 6K video resolution with one display via Thunderbolt

$1,099: 3.0GHz 6-core Intel Core i5 processor, 8GB of memory, 512GB SSD storage, integrated Intel UHD Graphics 630 GPU, four Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports, up to 5K video resolution with one display via Thunderbolt

The Mac mini doesn’t use a hard drive, or even a Fusion Drive. Instead, Apple uses solid-state drives (SSDs) to provide fast performance. The company says that the SSDs are four times faster than the drives in the old Mac mini.

Mac mini: Ports

The M1 Mac mini and the Intel Mac mini have different port configurations. Here’s what you get.

$699 and $899 M1 Mac mini

  • gigabit ethernet (with an option to upgrade to 10 gigabit ethernet)
  • Two Thunderbolt 3/USB 4 ports
  • HDMI
  • Two USB-A ports
  • Headphone jack/audio out
mac mini m1 ports 2020

$1,099 Intel Mac mini

  • gigabit ethernet (with an option to upgrade to 10 gigabit ethernet)
  • Four Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports
  • HDMI
  • Two USB-A ports
  • Headphone jack/audio out
mac mini 2018 ports

You get more Thunderbolt/USB ports on the more expensive Intel Mac mini. You might need to buy a Thunderbolt/USB hub if you are considering the lower-priced models.

Mac mini: Display, keyboard, and mouse

The Mac mini does not include a display, keyboard, or mouse, so you’ll have to provide your own. Or you can customize your order to include these devices as extra-cost options. Apple sells the Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad, Magic Mouse 2, and Magic Trackpad 2.

Since the Mac mini lacks an optical drive, you need to buy an external USB optical drive if you want to read or burn CDs and DVDs.

AppleCare+ is available for the Mac mini for $99, which extends the standard one-year warranty to three years.

Mac mini: Connectivity

The Mac mini has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It also has a gigabit ethernet port, in case you want to connect to a wired network. A 10 gigabit ethernet option is available for an additional fee. There are also Thunderbolt/USB ports (see the Mac mini: Ports section above).

To connect a display, you can use the HDMI port or a Thunderbolt 3 port. You might have to buy an adapter in order to connect your display. You can consult our Thunderbolt 3 adapter guide to see what you need to connect to DVI, DisplayPort/mini DisplayPort, or VGA.

Mac mini: Speed

The new $699 M1 Mac mini blows right past its predecessor, the 3.6GHz quad-core Intel Core i3 Mac mini, and leaves it in the dust. Read out full review.

The fact that the M1 Mac mini supports a maximum of 16GB may be a concern for some customers, especially those who use high-end software for professional purposes. You may cosinder the Intel Mac mini Apple comes with a 3.0GHz 6-core Core i5 CPU and can be configured with up to 64GB of memory.

Apple has stated that its Apple silicon rollout is a two-year effort. It starts with the “consumer” level M1. Apple has not revealed its roadmap, but we can safely assume that the company is working on chips that are faster, capable of using more memory, support more than two Thunderbolt ports, and even work with a discrete GPU. If that’s the Mac mini you want, you need to wait.

Macworld’s buying advice

For new Mac users switching from a PC, the Mac mini is an excellent machine. It’s a great choice for shoppers on a budget and it handles everyday usage well. The Mac mini is also an ideal Mac for a household looking to install a second or third computer. And it is a very good machine to use as a server, either for your network, for watching media, or for a situation where you need desktop power in a small footprint.

Ready to buy a Mac mini? Go to the Apple Store

Sours: https://www.macworld.com/article/230292/mac-mini-features-specifications-prices-faq.html
Using a 34\

Mac Mini

Desktop computer by Apple

‹ The templateInfobox information appliance is being considered for merging. ›

The Mac Mini (stylized as Mac mini) is a small form-factordesktop computer developed and marketed by Apple Inc, positioned between the consumer all-in-one iMac and the professional Mac Pro as one of the three current Macintosh desktop computers. It was the company's only consumer desktop computer since 2005 to ship without a display, a keyboard, and a mouse. The machine was initially branded it as BYODKM (Bring Your Own Display, Keyboard, and Mouse), as a deliberate strategic process to pitch users to switch from PC running other operating systems such as Microsoft Windows and Linux.

The original Mac Mini was introduced in January 2005 as a base model to PowerPC G4architecture. Announced in February 2006, the second-generation lineup featured advanced components and numerous internal software updates. The third-generation, unveiled in June 2010, brought forth a thinner unibody aluminum case and an HDMI port, more readily positioning it as a home theater device alternative to the Apple TV.

The fourth-generation 2018 revision model offers Thunderbolt, Intel Core i5, i7 processor, when it had also change the default silver to a much darker space gray color. This model features solid-state storage as standard, and replaces most data ports with USB-C. The fifth-generation lineup, operating Apple Silicon, was introduced in November 2020, which again returns the color to the original silver style. The fourth-generation remains on the sales alongside the fifth-generation model; additionally, a server version of the Mac Mini, bundled with the Server edition of the OS X operating system, was offered from 2009 to 2014.

Lineup[edit]

Further information: List of Mac Mini specifications

The Mac Mini was modeled after the shape of a standard digital media player,[1] and runs macOS.[2] It was initially advertised as BYODKM (Bring Your Own Display, Keyboard, and Mouse), aiming for market-share expansion upon customers from brands like Microsoft Windows and Linux.[3] It was the company's only consumer computer shipped without paired display, keyboard, and mouse since its original releases dating back to 2005.[4][5] A removable panel was attached down at the bottom of the chassis to the Mac Minis for RAM upgrades. The cases does not void the product warranty itself, and so broken pieces were not covered.[6] Since the 2011 third generation revision, the Kensington Security Slot and the optical drive as well, were removed to all models;[7] leaving internal storage spaces for either a second internal hard drive or SSD, which can be ordered from Apple, or as an upgrade kit from third party suppliers.[8]

First generation (PowerPC G4)[edit]

Mac Mini first generation, viewed above

The first generation Mac Mini (pictured), codenamed G4,was meant as an entry-level computer for budget-minded customers in terms of its cheap pricing.

Visualization depiction illustration the components of a Mac Mini G4

Component Specification labels, pictured to the lower portion from left to right: Power button, USB 2.0, Ethernet, HDMI, Component Videos, Analog Audios, and Digital Optical Audio

A small form factor computer had been widely speculated and requested long before the release of the Mac Mini.[9] In January. 2005, the Mac Mini G4 was introduced alongside the iPod shuffle at the Macworld Conference & Expo, as Apple CEO Steve Jobs marketed the "The cheapest, and most affordable Mac ever".[5][10] The machine was intended as an entry-level computer for budget-minded customers. In comparison to regular desktops, which use standard-sized components such as 3.5-inch hard drives and full-size DIMMs, it utilizes low-power laptop components for it to fit into such small cases and avoid overheating in the process.[11]

The aluminum case, capped with polycarbonate plastic on the top and bottom, has an optical drive slot on the front and the I/O ports and vents for the cooling system on the back. It has an external 85W power supply.[12] Mac Mini G4 has no visible screws, reflection Apple's intention that the computer not be upgraded by the user. Some Mac Mini owners used a putty knife or a pizza cutter to open the case to install third-party memory, which could be obtained far more cheaply than offering.[13] The company describes this procedure in numerous details, including an official Apple part number for a "modified putty knife".[14]

Hardware[edit]

The Mac Mini G4 was based on a single-core 32-bitPowerPC processors with 512 KB (1 KB = 1024 B) of on-chip L2 cache. The processor – running at 1.25, 1.33, 1.42, or 1.5 GHz, varied on the model – accesses memory through a front-side bus clocked at 167 MHz. It can also be overclocked to higher frequencies by either soldering or desoldering certain zero-ohm resistors on the logic board.[15][16] An ATI Radeon 9200 graphics processor with 32 MB of DDR SDRAM (1 MB = 1024 KB) came standard; in 2005's final Mac Mini G4, Apple added a high-end option for 64 MB VRAM.[17] It uses 333 MHz DDR SDRAM. It has just one desktop-sized DIMM slot for random-access memory, allowing a maximum of 1 GB of memory (1 GB = 1024 MB). This relatively small amount often forced the system to page against hard disk, slowing operation considerably. (Intel models of Mac Mini use two notebook DIMM slots.) The Mac Mini G4 uses a single 2.5-inch Ultra ATA/100 hard drive, which offers a maximum transfer rate of 100 MB/s. Because of its sealed enclosure, it is not possible to upgrade the hard drive without opening the enclosure and possibly voiding the warranty of the system.[6] The Mac Mini G4 also contains a second ATA cable that connects to the optical drive. A Combo drive was included as standard, while a SuperDrive able to write to DVDs was also an option.[18]

Connectivity[edit]

The Mac Mini G4 incorporates two USB 2.0 ports and one FireWire 400 port. Networking is supported with 10/100 Ethernet and 56k V.92 modem, while 802.11b/g Wi-Fi and Bluetooth were additional build-to-order options. External displays are supported via a DVI port. Adaptors are also available for VGA, S-Video, and composite video. The system contains a built-in speaker and an analog 1/8-inch stereo mini jack. This new Wi-Fi card also no longer uses an MMCX-Female connector for the antenna (as the prior models did) but rather a proprietary Apple One.[19] It was compatible to operating systems designed for the PowerPC architecture. For example, users can install the AmigaOS-compatible MorphOS, OpenBSD,[20] or Linux distributions such as Debian or Ubuntu.[21][22][23][24] Unlike the Intel models, the Mac Mini G4 running Mac OS X 10.4 can run Mac OS 9 "Classic" applications, as long as a bootable copy of the OS 9 System folder is installed from which to run the Classic environment (although a Mac Mini G4 cannot natively boot to Mac OS 9). As of Mac OS X 10.5, the ability to run the Classic Environment was removed. Later, Mac OS 9 was able to run on the Mac Mini G4 through an unofficial patcher, though this is not supported in any way by Apple.[25]

Second generation (Intel-based)[edit]

In February 2006, Apple announced the second generation lineup Mac Mini which was based on the Intel processor Core Solo or Duo, which was four times faster compared to its predecessor.[26][27] The machine received a server version update in October 2019, been marketed from as an affordable for small financial and academic uses, switched from optical drive to a hard drive implementation.[28]

Hardware[edit]

The second generation Mac Mini

The Intel-based Mac Mini (pictured from above)

Back panel of a late 2009 3,1 model Mac Mini. Ordered from left to right, first row: power button, ventilation holes, Kensington lock slot, audio in, audio out. Second row: DC in, gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 800, Mini DVI, Mini-DisplayPort, 5 USB 2.0 ports

Back panel of a late 2009 3,1 model Mac Mini. Pictured from left to right, first row: power button, ventilation holes, Kensington lock slot, audio in, audio out. Second row: DC in, gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 800, Mini DVI, Mini-DisplayPort, 5 USB 2.0 ports

The 2006 and 2007 models came with 32-bit Intel Core Solo processors available to be replaced with 64-bit Core 2 Duo processors through a simple upgrade.[29] Since the 2006 and 2007 "Merom"-based Mac Mini models were supplied with socketed processors, the 32-bit processor can easily be removed, and replaced with a compatible 64-bit Intel Core 2 Duo processor. The 2.00 GHz Intel T7200 SL9SF, 2.16 GHz Intel T7400 SL9SE, 2.33 GHz Intel T7600 SL9SD. 2009 and later models have the processors soldered onto the logic board and preventing it from being upgradable. Once the 2006 model is upgraded to a Core 2 Duo processor, it can support up to 2 GB of memory, and can run Mac OS X Lion through a minor modification by editing or deleting the platformsupport.plist file.[30][31] Many users have found that such upgrades can make the 2006/2007 models perform even better than the 2009 models. Geekbench scores have shown that the 2.33 GHz Core 2 Duo fitted Mac Mini with 2 GB of RAM has a score of 3060 whereas a late 2009 Mac Mini with 2 GB of RAM has 3056 making the two machines fairly comparable.[32][33]

While the Mac Mini G4 contained a separate graphics processor, all revisions of the Intel-based Mac Mini contain integrated GPUs, except in the 2011 version where the 2.5 GHz model contains a separate AMD Radeon GPU. In Apple's early marketing of the Mac Mini G4, it touted the superiority of the use of a discrete ATI Radeon 9200 32 MB graphics card over the integrated graphics included in many budget PCs.[34] The Intel GMA that was built into the Mac Mini was criticized for producing stuttering video, despite supporting hardware accelerated H.264 video playback, and disappointing frame rates in graphics-intensive 3D games.[35] Early and Late 2009 models corrected these performance issues with an improved NVIDIA based GeForce 9400M chipset.[36]

The Intel-based Mac Mini moves away from the formerly used Ultra ATA/100 to the newer Serial ATA interface, which offers a maximum 3 Gbit/s transfer rate, however all models of Intel Mac Mini have been limited to 1.5 Gbit/s even though the SATA standard supports a transfer of 3 Gbit/s. All models continue to use 2.5-inch hard drives as opposed to the 3.5-inch drives used in standard desktops. A server edition of the Mac Mini was introduced in October 2009, which omits the optical drive in favor of a second hard drive for a total of 1 TB of storage (1 TB = 1000 billion bytes). A Combo drive was initially offered as standard, with the SuperDrive being an option, but through the 2010 models, all models that have an optical drive contain the SuperDrive as standard. The 2010 standard version of the Mac (without Server) comes with a 0.3 TB or on 2.66 GHz 0.5 TB of storage. Unlike the Mac Mini G4, the Intel-based Mac Mini uses a dual-channel architecture for memory. The original Intel-based Mac Mini uses 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM, while models starting with the early 2009 revision use 1066 MHz DDR3 SDRAM.[37]

Connectivity[edit]

The Intel-based Mac Mini includes four USB 2.0 ports and one FireWire 400 port. The I/O ports were changed with the early 2009 revision, with a fifth USB 2.0 port added and the FireWire 400 port replaced with a FireWire 800 port. An infrared receiver was added allowing the use of an Apple Remote. Bluetooth 2.0+EDR and 802.11gWi-Fi became standard after being optional in the G4 version, and the Ethernet port was upgraded to Gigabit, while a built-in 56k modem is no longer available.[38] The 2009 models added 802.11 draft-n and later 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth was also upgraded from 2.0 to 2.1. External displays are supported through a DVI port. The 2009 models change the video outputs to Mini-DVI and Mini DisplayPort, which allowed for dual displays. The Mini DisplayPort supports external displays with a resolution up to 2560×1600, which allows use of the 30-inch Cinema Display. While the Mac Mini G4 supported only analog audio output, the Intel-based Mac Mini has separate Mini-TOSLINK/3.5 mm mini-jacks that supported both analog audio input and output as well optical digital S/PDIF input and output.[39][40]

Third generation (Unibody)[edit]

Mac Mini 2010 optical drive front viewed

Mac Mini 2010 optical drive (pictured from front)

Back panel of a mid-2010 4,1 model unibody Mac Mini. Ordered left to right, first row: power button, AC power supply plug, Gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 800, HDMI, Mini-DisplayPort, 4 USB 2.0 ports, SDXC card slot. Second row: ventilation holes, audio in, audio out

Back panel of a mid-2010, 4,1 model unibody Mac Mini. Pictured from left to right, first row: power button, AC power supply plug, Gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 800, HDMI, Mini-DisplayPort, 4 USB 2.0 ports, SDXC card slot. Second row: ventilation holes, audio in, audio out

In June 2010, Apple unveiled the third generation lineup of Mac Mini compacted with thinner unibody aluminum case. It includes an internal power supply and an SD card slot.[41] An HDMI port as well, as Apple marketed as HDMI 1.4 compliant, replaces the Mini-DVI port as one of the principal video connection methods.[42]

In July 2011, a hardware update was announced, which provides a Thunderbolt port, the dual-core Intel Core i5 and 4-core i7 processors, support for up to 16 GB of memory, Bluetooth 4.0, and either the Intel HD Graphics 3000 integrated graphics or the AMD Radeon HD 6630M dedicated graphics. The revision, however, removed the internal CD/DVD optical drive, the server model was then upgraded to a quad-core Core i7 processor. Apple updated the line on October 23, 2012 with Ivy Bridge processors, USB 3.0, and upgraded graphics.[43] On October 16, 2014 the line was updated with Haswell processors, improved graphics, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and Thunderbolt 2. The FireWire 800 port was replaced with a second Thunderbolt port. The price of the base-model was lowered by $100. The only change to the body was the removal of the two holes used to open the case, as the memory was no longer upgradable because it was soldered to the logic board. Since the integrated graphics processor does not have its own dedicated memory, the system shares some of the main system memory with it.[44]4K video output via HDMI was added.[45]

Comparing the high ends of both releases, the 2012 original model used a 4-core, 8-thread Intel Core i7-3720QM, whereas the 2014 model used a 2-core, 4-thread Intel Core i7-4578U. The 2014 updated model featured Intel Iris graphics (GT3), which greatly outperforms the Intel HD Graphics 4000 (GT2) in the previous models.[46] The late 2014 CPUs were also more energy-efficient: their maximal thermal design power (TDP) was 62% lower than that of the 2012 models.[47][48] Memory can again be replaced, unlike the 2014 models which had it soldered directly to the logic board, though it is not officially user-replaceable per Apple, and requires service by an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider.[49][50] The processor and flash storage are soldered to the logic board and cannot be replaced.[51] The late 2014 third generation underwent internal process transition to dual-cores, performing a lower-quality of multi-threaded workloads compared to the quad-core processors from the un-updated 2012 original third generation model, though the single-threaded workload interactions speed rates increased.[52]

Fourth generation (Coffee Lake)[edit]

The fourth generation Mac Mini, viewed from above

The fourth generation Mac Mini (pictured from above)

Backpannel labels for the forth generation Mac Mini

Back panel of a 2018 Mac Mini. Pictured from left to right, first row: power button, AC power supply plug, Gigabit Ethernet, 4 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C 3.1 Gen 2), HDMI 2.0, 2 USB 3.0 Type-A. Second row: ventilation holes, and audio out

Four years later in October 2018, Apple announced the fourth generation Mac Mini, been equipped with the Intel processor Coffee Lake , the T2 series chip for internal security, and connectivity supports to Bluetooth 5, four USB-C 3.1 gen, 2 ports that support Thunderbolt 3, two USB 3.0 Type-A ports, and HDMI 2.0. PCIe-based flash storage is standard with no option of a hard disk drive. The storage was changed to a baseline 128 GB, with a maximum of 2 TB. The RAM was increased to a baseline of 8 GB, and a maximum of 64 GB of SO-DIMM DDR4. The chassis is a carryover from the Mac minis released from 2010 to 2014, measuring the same dimensions, though is only available in a darker "space gray" finish.[53] The 2018 Mac mini removes legacy I/O such as the SD card reader, SATA drive bay, IR receiver, optical S/PDIF (TOSLINK) audio out, and audio in. macOS Catalina added support for Dolby Atmos, Dolby Vision, and HDR10.[54] In March 2020, Apple doubled the default storage in both base models.[55]

Fifth generation (Apple Silicon)[edit]

The fifth generation Apple Silicon Mac Mini, from above view

The fifth generation Apple Silicon Mac Mini (pictured from above)

Back Panel labels for the fifth generation Mac Mini

Back panel of the fifth-generation Mac Mini. Pictured from left to right, first row: power button, power port plug, Gigabit Ethernet/10 Gigabit Ethernet, 2 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C), HDMI 2.0, 2 USB 3.0. Second row: ventilation holes, and 3.5 mm headphone jack

The fifth generation lineup using the Apple M1 chip was announced on November 10, 2020 alongside the updated models of MacBook Air and MacBook Pro as part of an internal processor transition from Intel to Apple Silicon.[56] It was released on November 17, 2020, and gradually became one of the three consumer Apple Silicon-based consumer computers along with the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro.[57][58] The Mac Mini Apple Silicon dropped from the proceeding price off $USD 100 dollars cheaper, pricing $USD 699 dollars. It added support for Wi-Fi 6, USB4, and 6K output to run the Pro Display XDR. Externally, it is very similar to the 2018 Mac Mini but returns to a lighter, silver finish similar to that of the models released from 2010 to 2014.[59]

Options for over 16 GB of RAM are no longer available.[60] External display support is also reduced to one display over USB-C/Thunderbolt, though a second display is supported over HDMI; the previous Intel-based model could drive two 4K displays over USB-C/Thunderbolt.[61] On April 20, 2021, 10 Gigabit Ethernet was added as a built-to-order option.[62] It made uses of a thermal-based design for its internal cooling system; Apple claims it has 5x faster performance than the best-selling Windows desktop computer in its price range.[63] The Apple silicon Mac Mini was preceded by the A12Z-based Developer Transition Kit, a prototype for developers using a Mac Mini enclosure, released on June 22, 2020.[64] It came with 16 GB of RAM, 512 GB of storage, and two USB-C ports.[65]

Reception[edit]

In general, the Mac Mini has been praised as a relatively affordable computer with a solid range of features. Reviews noted it is possible to purchase small computers at the same price with faster processors, better graphics card, more memory, and more storage.[66] The small size has made the Mac Mini particularly popular as a home theater solution. In addition, its size and reliability has helped keep resale values high.[67]

Home theater and server[edit]

Home theater[edit]

A 2008 Mac Mini as a home theater PC displaying the Front Row application interface
A 2008 Mac Mini as a home theater PC (pictured)demonstrating the Front Rowapplication

Due to its similarity in compact volumes and functionalists, it was often as a home theater PC, or as an Apple TV alternative. The system stationed in a native interface with Front Row, based on the foundation of the original Apple TV interface.[68][69] Unlike the Apple TV, the Mac Mini is backward compatible with televisions that have only composite or S-Video inputs.[70] As of the June 2011 revision, it includes Intel HD3000 graphics processor with an optional Radeon graphics processing unit available and Thunderbolt which makes decoding high-resolution video much faster.[71]

Pre-2009 models had a video connector compatible with DVI, HDMI (video only), SVGA, S-Video and composite video with appropriate adapters; its audios files was located at both the mini-headphone (analog) and optical fiber cables (digital).[72] The addition of an HDMI port on the 2010 Mac Mini simplifies connecting to high-definition televisions and home theater AV receivers. The HDMI port supported up to 1080p and 8 channel 24-bit audio at 192 kHz, Dolby Surround 5.1 and stereo output. The 2014 model added 4K output, and the 2018 model supports Dolby Atmos, Dolby Vision, and HDR10 with macOS Catalina.[45][54]

Server[edit]

The company offered a server configuration program originally pre-loaded with an OS X Server version of OS X, but was later switched to the standard version of OS X with an separate OS X Server package. The file included separate component applications such as "Server App" and "File Sharing", but soon enough in June 2011 was it available as part of a single purpose from Mac App Store to other Macintosh computers.[73] The Mid-2010 Server was initially the only Mac Mini model that had eliminated the optical drive to a replacement upon a second hard drive. This, however, and was no longer anymore since the mid-2011 models have also implemented the same conduct.[74]

The Mac Mini Server hardware was discontinued with the Late 2014 model. However, the macOS Server software package can be purchased from the Mac App Store.[75] In 2018, coinciding with macOS Mojave, Apple shipped macOS Server version 5.71, which stopped bundling open source services, including DHCP, DNS, Email, Firewall, FTP, Radius, VPN, Web, and Wiki. Apple states that customers are able to receive support for these services directly from open-source providers. Other Apple-proprietary services, such as Airport, Calendar, Contacts, Messages, and NetBoot were also removed, with no corresponding open source options.[76]

Alternatives for Mac users include running Linux or Windows virtualized, or installing third-party Unix packages via open source package managers such as Conda, Fink, Homebrew, MacPorts, Nix, pkgsrc, and Rudix[77] A few services – Caching, Files, Time Machine, and Web – moved to the macOS Mojave client, but can have limited configuration capability via Mojave's Sharing control panel. The Apache server GUI manager is replaced by apachectl commands in Terminal. The only services remaining in macOS Server 5.7.1 are Open Directory, Profile Manager, and Xsan.[78] Greenhouse gas emission projections for the Mac Mini Server were several times those of the regular Mac Mini, in part because of the extra hard disk, but also due to increased expected lifetime energy use; the percentage of CO2 from usage rose from 39% to 77%.[79]

See also[edit]

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External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_Mini

You will also be interested:

List of Mac Mini specifications

Model Mid 2010[20][21]Mid 2011[22][23]Late 2012[24][25]Late 2014[26]Component Intel Core 2 DuoIntel Core i5 & i7Release dateJune 15, 2010[27]July 20, 2011[28]October 23, 2012[29]October 16, 2014[30]Order numberMC270*/A MC438*/A (server model)MC815*/A MC816*/A MC936*/A (server model)MD387*/A MD388*/A MD389*/A (server model)MGEM2*/A MGEN2*/A MGEQ2*/A Machine modelMacmini4,1 Macmini5,1 Macmini5,2 Macmini5,3 Macmini6,1 Macmini6,2 Macmini7,1 Base Price at Launch$699 $999 $599 $799 $999 $599 $799 $999 $499 $699 $999 Model numberA1347 ProcessorIntel Core 2 Duo (P8600)
Optional 2.66 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo (P8800)Intel Core 2 Duo (P8800) 2-core Intel Core i5 (i5-2415M) 2-core Intel Core i5 (i5-2520M Turbo Boost up to 3.2 GHz)
Optional i7-2620M 2-core Intel Core i74-core Intel Core i7 (i7-2635QM) 2-core Intel Core i5 (i5-3210M) 4-core Intel Core i7 (i7-3615QM)
Optional i7-3720QM 4-core Intel Core i72-core Intel Core i5 (i5-4260U) 2-core Intel Core i5 (i5-4278U)
Optional i7-4578U 2-core Intel Core i72-core Intel Core i5 (i5-4308U)
Optional i7-4578U 2-core Intel Core i7Frequency
(Turbo Boost)2.4 GHz
2.66 GHz with P88002.66 GHz 2.3 GHz (2.9 GHz) 2.5 GHz (3.2 GHz)
2.7 GHz (3.4 GHz) with i7-2620M2.0 GHz (2.9 GHz) 2.5 GHz (3.1 GHz) 2.3 GHz (3.3 GHz)
2.6 GHz (3.6 GHz) with i7-3720QM1.4 GHz (2.7 GHz) 2.6 GHz (3.1 GHz)
3 GHz (3.5 GHz) with i7-4578U2.8 GHz (3.3 GHz)
3 GHz (3.5 GHz) with i7-4578UCores(threads)2 2 (4) 4 (8) 2 (4) 4 (8) 2 (4) Cache3 MB on-chip L2 3 MB on-chip shared L3 3 MB on-chip shared L3
4 MB on-chip shared L3 with i7-2620M6 MB on-chip shared L3 3 MB L3 6 MB L3 3 MB L3 3 MB L3
4 MB L3 with i7-4578UFront-side bus1066 MHz DMIMemory
two RAM slots pre-20142 GB (2 × 1 GB)
Expandable to 8 GB (2 × 4 GB)4 GB (2 × 2 GB)
Expandable to 8 GB (2 × 4 GB)2 GB (2 × 1 GB)
Optional 4 (2 × 2 GB) or 8 GB (2 × 4 GB)4 GB (2 × 2 GB)
Optional 8 GB (2 × 4 GB)4 GB (2 × 2 GB)
Optional 8 GB (2 × 4 GB) or 16 GB (2 × 8 GB)[31]4 GB soldered on board[32]
Optional 8 or 16 GB available at time of purchase only8 GB soldered on board [32]
Optional 16 GB available at time of purchase only1066 MHz DDR3 SDRAM1333 MHz DDR3 SDRAM1600 MHz DDR3 SDRAM[33]1600 MHz LPDDR3 SDRAM[33]Graphics
shared with main memoryNvidia GeForce320M using 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM Intel HD Graphics3000 processor with 288 MB of DDR3 SDRAM AMD Radeon HD6630M graphics processor with dedicated 256 MB of GDDR5 memory Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor with 384 MB of DDR3 SDRAM Intel HD Graphics4000Intel HD Graphics 5000 processor Intel Iris Graphics 5100Hard drive320 GB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 500 GB 5400 rpm HDD2 × 500 GB 5400 rpm HDD 500 GB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 750 GB 5400 rpm HDD500 GB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 750 GB 5400 rpm HDD, 256 GB SSD, or 1 × 256 GB SSD + 1 × 750 GB 5400 rpm HDD2 × 500 GB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 2 × 750 GB 5400 rpm HDD, 1 or 2× 256 GB SSD(s), or 1× 256 GB SSD + 1 × 750 GB 5400 rpm HDD500 GB 5400 rpm HDD[34]1 TB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 1 TBFusion Drive or 256 GB SSD[35]2 × 1 TB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 1 or 2 × 256 GB SSD(s)[36]500 GB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 1 TB Fusion Drive1 TB 5400 rpm HDD
Optional 1 TB Fusion Drive or 256 GB SSD1 TB Fusion Drive
Optional 2 TB Fusion Drive or 256, 512 GB or 1 TB SSDSATA II (3 Gbit/s) SATA III (6 Gbit/s) Optical driveSuperDrive (writes: 6× DVD±R-DL, 8× DVD±R, 6× DVD-RW, 8× DVD+RW; reads: 8× DVD±R, 24× CD, 24× CD-R and CD-RW None included
(Optional External SuperDrive)Connectivity10/100/1000 Base-T Gigabit Ethernet Bluetooth 2.1 + EDRBluetooth 4.0Built-in Wi-Fi 4 (802.11a/b/g/n) 2×2 chipset, up to 300 Mbit/s Built-in Wi-Fi 4 (802.11a/b/g/n) 3×3 chipset, up to 450 Mbit/s Built-in Wi-Fi 5 (802.11a/b/g/n/ac) 3×3 chipset, up to 1.3 Gbit/s IR receiver Peripheral connections4x USB 2.0 ports 4x USB 3.0 ports Mini DisplayPort
Supports one 2560×1600 displayThunderbolt port
Supports two 2560×1600 displays2x Thunderbolt 2 ports
Supports two 2560×1600 displaysFireWire 800 port NoneSDXC card slot HDMI port
Supports 1920×1200 outputHDMI port
Supports 3840×2160/30 Hz or 4096×2160/24 Hz output3.5 mm Line out/headphone jack, 3.5 mm line-in jack Minimum operating system Mac OS X 10.6 Snow LeopardMac OS X 10.7 LionOS X 10.8 Mountain LionOS X 10.10 YosemiteLatest release operating systemmacOS 10.13 High SierramacOS 10.15 CatalinamacOS 12 MontereyNoise
at idle13 dBA (2.4 GHz)
15 dBA (2.66 GHz)15 dBA 16 dBA 17 dBA 12 dBA[37]15 dBA[37]16 dBA 12 dBA[38]Power
(Non-Server Model)[39]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.23 W0.24 W0.26 W
Sleep1.39 W1.45 W1.42 W
Idle9.13 W9.14 W9.44 W
(Server Model)[40]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.19 W0.26 W0.31 W
Sleep1.18 W1.18 W1.28 W
Idle9.78 W9.78 W9.97 W
(Non-Server Models)[41]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.21 W0.21 W0.23 W
Sleep1.16 W1.14 W1.16 W
Idle12.97 W12.97 W12.85 W
(Server Model)[42]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.20 W0.21 W0.25 W
Sleep1.02 W1.02 W1.11 W
Idle11.98 W12.02 W12.36 W
(Non-Server Models)[43]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.26 W0.26 W0.32 W
Sleep1.25 W1.24 W1.25 W
Idle10.4 W10.3 W10.2 W
(Server Model)[44]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.24 W0.24 W0.25 W
Sleep1.62 W1.60 W1.61 W
Idle10.9 W10.08 W10.8 W
(All Models)[45]
Mode100 V115 V230 V
Off0.29 W0.29 W0.31 W
Sleep0.75 W0.71 W0.73 W
Idle5.9 W5.8 W5.5 W
Greenhouse gas emissions270 kg (600 lb) CO2e[39]710 kg (1,570 lb) CO2e[40]280 kg (620 lb) CO2e[41]1,130 kg (2,490 lb) CO2e[42]290 kg (640 lb) CO2e[43]1,020 kg (2,250 lb) CO2e[44]530 kg (1,170 lb) CO2e[45]Weight3.0 lb (1.4 kg) 2.8 lb (1.3 kg) 2.7 lb (1.2 kg) 3.0 lb (1.4 kg) 2.7 lb (1.2 kg) 2.9 lb (1.3 kg) 2.6 lb (1.2 kg) 2.7 lb (1.2 kg) Dimensions1.4 inches (36 mm) H × 7.7 inches (196 mm) W × 7.7 inches (196 mm) D
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Mac_Mini_specifications


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