Physics 122 uw

Physics 122 uw DEFAULT

Course Descriptions

For current information about Physics courses (codes PHYS/AST and PHYS SCI), please consult the Undergraduate Bulletin for the Department of Physics/Astronomy (2017-2019).

What to do if your class is full

Physics policy on wait lists

If the class you are interested in is full, it may be possible enroll on a waitlist. For more information, please contact Mary Margaret Hollstein ([email protected]), Academic Department Associate at 424-4433.

If you know there are classes you need for your major, it is better to take them as soon as you can rather than think you can take them later. Too often a senior cannot get into a lab class they need for graduation because it is already full and they must take the class in summer or the next semester.

Physical Science 101 Workshop Physical Science (NS)

A hands-on course covering basic concepts in physical science through active engagement with guided computer-based laboratories, student-directed projects, interactive demonstrations, and class discussions. Emphasis on the nature and limits of science.

For elementary education majors and non-science majors. (3+2)

Physics/Astronomy 103 The Solar System (NS) (4 units)

The astronomer’s understanding of the earth, moon, and planets. Explores the basic nature of science and the scientific method.

Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+2) (Fall)

Physics/Astronomy 104 Stars, Galaxies & the Universe (NS) (4 units)

Universe beyond the solar system. Methods of science applied to classification of stars, galaxies, nebulae, and exotic objects such as pulsars, quasars, and black holes. Intended for non-science majors and science majors having an interest in astronomy. May be taken to satisfy the general education lab science requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+2) (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 105 Basic Acoustics of Music (NS) (4 units)

A course designed in cooperation with the music department principally for music majors interested in the acoustical foundation of this subject. Emphasis throughout is on the needs and interests of the music student. May not be counted toward a Physics major or minor. (3+2)

Physics/Astronomy 113 The Solar System – no lab (NS) (4 units)

The astronomer’s understanding of the earth, moon, and planets. Explores the basic nature of science and the scientific method.

Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+0) (Fall)  

This class does not meet USP requirements.

Physics/Astronomy 114 Stars, Galaxies & the Universe -no lab (NS) (3 units)

Identical to Physics 104 except no laboratory experience is included. May be used to satisfy laboratory science requirement only if Physics 124 is taken during a later term. Credit may not be earned for both Physics 114 and Physics 104.

Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3 + 0) (Spring)

This class does not meet USP requirements.

Physics/Astronomy 133 Solar System Laboratory (NS) (4 units)

Laboratory component of the Solar System, Physics 103. This class is designed for transfer students who have taken the lecture portion of 103 at a different institution.

Prerequisite: Physics 113. (0+2) (Fall)  

Physics/Astronomy 134 Stars, Galaxies & the Universe Laboratory (NS) (1 unit)

Laboratory component of Cosmic Evolution, Physics 104. This class is designed for transfer students who have taken the lecture portion of 104 at a different institution.

Prerequisite: Physics 114. (0+2) (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 138 Energy in Today’s World (NS) (XL) (4 Credits)

Focus is on the physics of energy, energy production, and energy consumption, conservation practices and alternative energy sources.
Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam.

Physics/Astronomy 145 Introduction to Topics in Physics

(1-3 units)

A general introduction to selected topics in physics. A historical perspective of fundamental ideas of motion will be examined. Focus will be on the development of problem-solving skills in such areas as unit analysis; making approximations; and using trigonometry, exponential functions, logarithms, vectors, derivatives, integrals, and graphs. A blend of history, selected topics, direct experiences, problem-solving practice and applying math skills is used to enhance preparation for success in physics courses.

Prerequisite: Consent of department.

Physics/Astronomy 171 General Physics (NS) (5 units)

A survey of mechanics and properties of matter. Recommended for liberal arts majors and pre-professionals. Not recommended for physics majors and minors and pre-engineers.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or equivalent. (3+1+2) (Fall)

Physics/Astronomy 172 General Physics (NS) (5 units)

A survey of waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear radiation. Recommended for liberal arts majors and pre-professionals. Not recommended for physics majors and minors.

Prerequisite: Physics 171 and Mathematics 108 or equivalent. (3+1+2) (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 191 General Physics (NS) (5 units)

A survey of mechanics, sound, and heat providing a background for advanced work in these fields. Recommended for students in pre-engineering and majors in physics, chemistry, or mathematics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 171 or consent of instructor. (4+2) (Fall)

Physics/Astronomy 192 General Physics (NS) (5 units)

A survey of electricity, magnetism, and light providing a background for advanced work in these fields. Recommended for students in pre-engineering and majors in physics, chemistry, or mathematics.

Prerequisite: Physics 191 or 171 and concurrent enrollment or previous completion of Mathematics 172. (4+2) (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 201 Statics for Engineering (3 units)

The action of forces on bodies at rest or in equilibrium. For pre-engineering students and not ordinarily taken by physics majors and minors.

Prerequisite: Physics 107 or 109 (may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 171. (3+0)

Physics/Astronomy 202 Dynamics for Engineering (3 units)

Motion and the action of forces that produce or modify the motion of bodies. For pre-engineering students and not ordinarily taken by physics majors and minors.

Prerequisite: Physics 201 and Mathematics 172 (may be taken concurrently). (3+0)

Physics/Astronomy 203 An Introduction to Astrophysics (3 units)

A systematic introduction to the concepts and methods of astrophysics, astronomical measurements and units, astrophysical nature of radiation, stellar structure, and cosmology.  This course is calculus based and designed for physics or other science majors interested in obtaining an astronomy minor.  

Prerequisite:  Physics 110 or Physics 108 and Mathematics 171.

Physics/Astronomy 206 Introductory Modern Physics (3 units)

Twentieth century physics; emphasis on atomic and sub-atomic phenomena. Normally acceptable for pre-engineering students.

Prerequisite: Physics 110 or Physics 108 and Mathematics 171. (3+0) (Fall)  

Physics/Astronomy 222 Physics Lab I (2 units)

An experimental treatment of concepts and theories associated with modern physics and classical mechanics. Emphasis is placed on developing experimental skills and techniques appropriate for advanced laboratory work.

Prerequisites: Physics 206 and concurrent registration in Physics 320. (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 305 Electronic Circuits and Devices (3 units)

DC and AC circuit theory with emphasis placed on the external electrical properties of analog devices and their practical applications. Prerequisites: Physics 108, 110, or consent of instructor. (2+2)

Physics/Astronomy 307 Physical Optics (4 units)

Review of geometrical optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, double refraction, electromagnetic theory of light, introduction to quantum optics and lasers.

Prerequisite: Physics 110 and Mathematics 172. 307/507 (3+0)

Physics/Astronomy 310 Stellar Structure and Evolution(3 units)

A systematic study of stellar atmospheres and interiors, stellar evolution and variable stars.  This course is calculus based and designed for physics or other science majors interested in obtaining an astronomy minor.

Prerequisite: Completion of Physics 203 with a grade of C or better.

Physics/Astronomy 311 Digital Instrumentation (NS) (3 units)

Fundamentals and applications of combinational and sequential digital circuits, memory and storage, microprocessors, digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion, emphasizing use in measurement and instrumentation. Credit may not be earned for both Physics 211 and 311/511.

Prerequisite: Previous physics or electronics course, Mathematics 122 or consent of instructor. 311/511 (2+2)

Physics/Astronomy 313 Galaxies, the Interstellar Medium and Star Formation (3 units)

A systematic study of galactic components and structure, physics of the interstellar medium and star formation.  This course is calculus based and designed for physics or other science majors interested in obtaining an astronomy minor.

Prerequisite: Completion of Physics 203 with a grade of C or better.

Physics/Astronomy 319 Digital Signal Processing (3 units)

The fundamentals of digital signal processing techniques with an emphasis on their computer implementation: linear shift-invariant systems, the Z-transform, the discrete and continuous Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and inverse filters. Familiarity with calculus, complex numbers, and BASIC or FORTRAN is assumed. 319/519 (3+0)

Physics/Astronomy 320 Classical Physics (3 units)

The physical and mathematical concepts associated with one-dimensional motion, two and three-dimensional motion including the use of different coordinate systems and accelerating reference frames. Analytical, numerical and graphical methods using modern computer technology will be used.

Prerequisite: Physics 109 and Mathematics 172. (3+0) (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 322 Physics Lab II (2 units)

An experimental treatment of concepts and theories associated with physical optics and thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Emphasis is placed on developing experimental skills and techniques appropriate for advanced laboratory work.

Prerequisites: Prior completion of or concurrent registration in Physics 307 and Physics 408. (Spring)

Physics/Astronomy 335 Demonstration and Laboratory Techniques in Physics (NS) (3 units)

A laboratory course to provide the high school physics teacher with opportunities to handle the physical apparatus used in modern physics curricula.

Prerequisite: A two-term sequence in General Physics. 335/535 (1+3)

Physics/ Astronomy 350 Research Issues in Physics Education (TC) (1 unit)

A survey of the Physics Education Research (PER) literature for prospective physics teachers. Topics include common student misconceptions in mechanics, optics, and electric circuits; theoretical frameworks in education research; and basic research methods. The course is taught in an informal discussion format (once per week).

Physics/ Astronomy 351 Teaching Issues in Physics Education (TC) (1 unit)

A survey of teaching strategies that address common student difficulties in introductory physics. Topics include learning cycles, classroom discourse, and group dynamics. The course meets biweekly for an hour. Each Physics 351 student receives an eight-hour internship experience in Workshop Physics Science (Physics 101). During this time, students will observe the instructor and engage 3-4 member groups of physics science students.

Physics/Astronomy 408 Statistical Physics and Thermodynamics (3 units)

Temperature, entropy, and other thermal quantities introduced from microscopic considerations and related to macroscopic thermodynamic variables. Calculation of macroscopic properties of matter from microscopic models.

Prerequisite: Physics 320. 408/608 (3+0)

Physics/Astronomy 417 Electricity and Magnetism (3 units)

An advanced treatment of important topics in electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: Physics 320. 417/617 (3+0)  

Physics/Astronomy 419 Introductory Quantum Mechanics (3 units)

Development of quantum mechanics principles and application to important simple physical systems.

Prerequisite: Physics 320. 419/619 (3+0)

Physics/Astronomy 422 Physics Lab III (2 units)

An experimental treatment of concepts and theories associated with electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. Emphasis is placed on developing experimental skills and techniques appropriate for advanced laboratory work.

Prerequisites: Prior completion of or concurrent registration in Physics 417 and Physics 419.

Physics/Astronomy 446 Independent Study (1-3 units)

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

Physics/Astronomy 451 Special Topics (1-3 units)

A Physics/Astronomy course on a topic not covered in the department’s curriculum. This course may be repeated with different content. Each time it is offered, the topic will be announced in the class schedule.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Physics/Astronomy 456 Related Readings (1-3 units)

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.  

Physics/Astronomy 474 Honors: Thesis (1-6 units)

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be Honors Thesis. Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty.

Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.).

Physics/Astronomy 491 Senior Research Project (1-4 units)

Independent research arranged with a faculty supervisor. A contract must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the department chairman prior to registration.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Minimum of 15 units (crs.) of physics completed. 

General Physics I and II (82-109 and 82-110)

This is the calculus based general physics sequence recommended for students in pre-engineering and majors in physics, chemistry, geology and mathematics.

An Introduction to Astrophysics (82-203)

A systematic introduction to the concepts and methods of astrophysics,  astronomical measurements and units,  astrophysical nature of radiation, stellar structure, and cosmology. This course is calculus based and designed for physics or other science majors interested in obtaining an astronomy minor. After completing this course, successful students will develop  understanding of (1) basic observational techniques used in astronomy  (2) simple modeling of stellar structure  (3) calculation of basic physical stellar parameters from photometric data, and (4) size, age, expansion, origin and evolution of the Universe.

Stellar Structure and Evolution (82-310)

A systematic study of stellar atmospheres and interiors, stellar evolution and variable stars. This course is calculus based and designed for physics or other science majors interested in obtaining an astronomy minor. After completing this course, successful students will have a better understanding of (1) the processes taking place  in the stellar  interiors, (2) radiative transfer of energy through stellar atmospheres (3) structure and evolution of stars of different masses, and (4) stellar pulsations as a method of investigating the interiors of stars.

Galaxies, the Interstellar Medium and Star Formation (82-313)

A systematic study of galactic components and structure, physics of the interstellar medium and star formation. This course is calculus based and designed for physics or other science majors interested in obtaining an astronomy minor. After completing this course, successful students will have a better understanding of (1) components and overall properties of various galactic types, (2) gas dynamics and stellar dynamics, (3) the composition, topology and physics of the interstellar matter and (4) star formation and galaxy evolution.

Sours: https://uwosh.edu/physics/programs/courses/

Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Bulletin Course Description Introduction

Course descriptions are listed (in this section) in alphabetical order by curricular subject abbreviations. Undergraduate courses are those numbered from 100 through 499. All numbers above that are for graduate credit.

General Education, Racial and Ethnic Studies and Global Perspective Requirements

This section describes the purpose of and outlines the requirements of each of these course categories.

Each degree program has a general education component designed to provide you with knowledge and skills in communication, analytic reasoning, natural sciences, arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, contemporary issues, social responsibility and ethical reasoning. The university also requires students to take courses to learn about the diverse cultures that make up the United States. With careful planning, some of the general education courses and racial and ethnic studies courses may overlap. That is, you may take a course that meets both general education and racial and ethnic studies requirements. While the credits you earn count once toward graduation, they may be used to satisfy requirements in these two areas. The global perspective requirement for undergraduates stems from the goals of UW-Stout’s distinctive mission and array of programs that combine theory, practice and experimentation.

General Education Credit Distribution

  

Racial and Ethnic Studies Requirements

The Racial and Ethnic Studies requirement is six credits with a minimum of three credits from RES-A. Each student must satisfy the racial and ethnic studies requirement as preparation for being an engaged citizen in a highly diverse society. Racial and ethnic studies courses prepare students for being engaged citizens in a highly diverse society and to come to appreciate, understand, value and respond respectfully to cultural diversity. Through the study of U.S. cultures other than those from a European origin, we hope to discourage racism and thus reduce its effects. An important emphasis is critical reflection and application of acquired learning to professional and personal contexts. Lists of the racial and ethnic studies courses in each category are available online. Transfer students who have fulfilled the racial and ethnic studies requirement at another UW System university are exempt from meeting UW-Stout’s criteria.

Global Perspective Requirement

Both the globalization of work and the career education that is part of UW-Stout’s mission make it desirable that students appreciate cultural, economic, political, environmental and social differences. Learning a second language at the college level and developing an understanding of another culture provides students with skills they will use in international situations. To earn a bachelor’s degree, students who started Fall 2010 or later must fulfill a global perspective requirement by:

  • Completing a program of university-approved work or study abroad, or
  • Completing six credits of courses approved as fulfilling the global perspective requirement.

Interpreting Course Descriptions

This document will help you understand the various codes used in the course descriptions that follow.

A typical course description in the Undergraduate Bulletin appears like this:

LIT 273 American Multicultural Literature  

The three digits of the course codes refer to the course level. The 100 series is primarily for freshmen; 200 – sophomores; 300 – juniors; and 400 – seniors.

Credits

UW-Stout defines a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that reasonably approximates: [1] At least one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately 15 weeks for one semester hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or [2] At least an equivalent amount of work as required in part one [1] of this definition for other academic activities as established by UW-Stout, including distance education, online, hybrid, or other indirect faculty instruction, laboratory work, internships, co-op experiences, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Course Planning Information

Information included with the course description helps you as you plan your course schedules. General Education, Racial and Ethnic Studies, Global Perspective, repeatability, and terms offered (if known) are indicated.

The terms indicated serve only as a general guide and do not guarantee that a course will be offered during a particular semester. Verify availability of a course in any given term by checking the online Open Courses listing or through Access Stout when planning your schedule.

Sours: https://bulletin.uwstout.edu/content.php?catoid=4&catoid=4&navoid=55&filter%5Bitem_type%5D=3&filter%5Bonly_active%5D=1&filter%5B3%5D=1&filter%5Bcpage%5D=16
  1. Lucas 17:4
  2. Holley temperature sensor
  3. Printable year in pixels
  4. Monster falls

PHYS 122 A: Electromagnetism

Topics covered

Phys 122 covers the following topics:

  • electric force and field (Gauss's law)
  • electric potential and potential energy
  • capacitors
  • electric circuits
  • magnetic force and field (Ampere's law)
  • special relativity
  • magnetic induction (Faraday's law and Lenz's law)
  • electromagnetic waves
  • AC circuits

Overview

This course has multiple components lecture, lab, and tutorial (QZ section in time schedule) each of which has several important aspects.  These are described below after some general information critical to success in this course.

Resources to Succeed

This website describes recommended practices to succeed in this course, and contains a list of resources you may find helpful for a variety of issues students may encounter during your time at UW.  Contact us if you need help finding the resources you need.

One very important practice described in the above website is working collaboratively. We will create a space for you to communicate with your peers in your tutorial section and TA in a Slack channel. See Getting Started for more details.  However, you are encouraged to reach out to other students to find people with whom you can study and learn.

To organize your coursework, we have posted sample weekly schedule here. We recommend downloading it, and make your own by moving various cells (except the due dates in red cells).

Office Hours and Posting Questions

During the week the TAs and I will hold office hours on Zoom where you can ask questions.  Click Office hours for the office hour schedule. 

Use Slack or the Discussion Board for physics questions or syllabus related questions.  Students are encouraged to answer each others' questions, but I will also monitor this frequently and will respond if needed.

Contact information

For questions send an email with your course (Phys 122), your UW netID (the part before @uw.edu in your email address), and name as it appears on Canvas to your section lecturer for lecture-related questions and for personal correspondence related to grades, health issues, etc:

For Lab and Tutorial questions, please contact your TA (contact information here) or the PHYS 122 TA coordinator (Kazumi Tolich) at [email protected] for questions about your TA or questions that your TA may not be able to answer.

For administrator questions related to registering, overloading, etc contact the program coordinator at [email protected] 

Course Material

You need to purchase the following items:

  • The Tutorial Course Pack,
  • Access code for MyLab and Mastering,
    • See purchasing options here.
  • Textbook: Principles & Practice of Physics, 1st edition by Mazur
    • See purchasing options here.

Getting started

  • Connect to the online homework system using the instructions found here.
  • For labs, we will use Pivot to perform video experiments.  Note that you have already paid for access to Pivot through the course fee as part of registration.  Your TA will announce details on how to get access during the first week of the quarter.
  • Slack will be the primary space where you can communicate with your peers and your TA.
    • Use your UW email to join our Slack workspace.
    • Get Slack running on your device. Here are useful tips and features for using Slack. We highly recommend downloading the mobile or desktop app, and turning notifications on so that you don't miss messages from your TA and other members in your tutorial section.

Class components

This class consists of lecture, lab, tutorial and exam components.  You can see all the components required in a given week in Modules.

Important Note: Since each exam includes questions based on the lectures, labs, and tutorials, missing a lecture, lab, or tutorial section can have an impact on your exam performance.  You should be sure to watch all lectures, and work through any lab or tutorial that you miss as soon as possible to minimize the impact on your course grade.

Lecture components:

Before each scheduled lecture you need to complete the assigned reading (see schedule below).  The lectures include the following graded components:

  • Lecture reading discussion (4% of grade):
    • Each week, you need to post at least once in the discussion channel in Slack something about the reading. Your post could be a question you have about the reading, a discussion about part of the reading you found particularly interesting, or an answer to a question posted by another student about the reading.
    • The TAs will read these to get a sense of common questions, and we will post a general response, but we will not respond to individual questions.
    • Your lowest reading discussion score will be dropped.  If you miss more than a week of discussions due to a valid reason (family and medical emergency etc.), please contact us.
  • Lecture video engagement (4% of grade):
    • After completing the reading you need to watch the lecture video and complete the embedded quizzes before 11:59 pm on the day of the assigned reading (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday).
    • These will be graded based on engagement, not on correctness.
    • Your lowest three video quizzes will be dropped.  If you miss more than three due to a valid reason (family and medical emergency etc.), please contact us.
  • Lecture homework (8% of grade):
    • These will be due on Tuesdays at 11:59 pm, and will be based on material covered in the previous weeks reading and video.
    • You can access the lecture homework in MyLab and Mastering.

Lab components:

  • Labs (12% of grade):
    • There are eight graded lab assignments, some of which may have multiple parts.
    • Each lab assignment under "Assignments" tells you the parts to be completed in Pivot.
    • The labs are due Wednesday at 11:59 pm.  Before then you need to collect and analyze data from video experiments on Pivot and answer questions based on your work.
      • After you start any of the assignments, you can save your work and go back to it as many times as you want before the deadline, thus, allowing you to talk to peers or a TA, and then go back and finish.
    • Each lab assignment will be graded based on the following:
      • Meeting learning objectives (3 points): Questions in the lab are answered, and the answers clearly show mastery of the learning objectives of the lab.
      • Needs some improvement (2 points): Questions in the lab are answered, but some answers indicate a lack of mastery of the learning objectives of the lab.
      • Needs significant improvement (1 point): Many questions in the lab are not answered and/or indicate significant lack of mastery of the learning objectives of the lab.
      • Not completed (0 points): Significant portion of the lab is not completed.
    • If you receive 0 points, 1 point, or 2 points, you can do or redo up to 2 labs without asking for permission.
      • After the deadline, you will temporarily no longer be able to submit new work. Once the lab has been graded, it will be reopened, and you can complete missing work or change your responses based on feedback.  You need to contact your TA to make sure that they grade the new work.
    • If you need to make-up more than 2 labs due to a valid reason (family and medical emergency etc.), contact us.

Tutorials components:

The tutorials include the following graded components:

  • Tutorial pretest (1% of grade):
    • These are designed to get you thinking about your ideas on topics covered in this course.  They are graded based on a thoughtful attempt, not on correctness.
    • These become available Friday at 3:30 PM and are due on Sunday at 11:59 pm.
    • Once you start a pretest, you will have 15 minutes to complete it without the ability to pause.
    • Your lowest tutorial pretest score will be automatically dropped.
    • If you miss more than one tutorial pretest due to a valid reason (family and medical emergency etc.), please contact us.
  • Tutorial in-class (3% of grade):
    • You need to attend and actively participate in discussion at your tutorial section (QZ section on time schedule) each week to get participation credit.  Each tutorial will be graded based on the following:
      • Adequate (2 points):Actively engaged in discussion throughout tutorial.
      • Needs improvement (1 point):  Multiple periods not engaged in discussion during tutorial.
      • Missing (0 points): Did not attend any tutorial section.
    • If you cannot attend your tutorial section in a given week, you can attend another section.  A schedule of tutorials with their Zoom links can be found here (select "12x" then select "122 Tutorial Schedule").  Be sure to contact your TA to let them know.
    • Your lowest tutorial in-class score will be automatically dropped.  However, you are still responsible for submitting the associated tutorial homework on time.
    • If you miss more than one tutorial in-class due to a valid reason (family and medical emergency etc.), please contact us.   
  • Tutorial homework (8% of grade):
    • Each tutorial has homework that is due at 11:59 pm theMonday after you have worked through the tutorial.
    • For each homework, you need to upload a scanned pdf file to the Canvas tutorial homework assignment. For instruction on how to create and upload a pdf, see the Tutorial Information.
    • If you submit your tutorial homework after it is due, there is a penalty of 1% deduction of the score for every hour that it is late.
    • If you need to submit tutorial homework late due to a valid reason (family and medical emergency etc.), please contact us.
    • Your lowest tutorial homework score will be automatically dropped.

All important tutorial information can be found under the Tutorial Information.  Once at the tutorial website select "12x" for information general to all courses in the Phys 121-122-123 sequence.  Select the link for section A, B or C under "PHYS 122" to get the schedule for all assignments specific to your class.

Exams:

Exams will be done online.  The exam procedure is described here.

The following dates are preliminary and may change.

  • Midterm exam 1 on February 4th starting between 4:55 and 5:15 pm (PST). Once you start the exam, you will have 60 minutes to finish the exam.
  • Midterm exam 2 on February 25th starting between 4:55 and 5:15 pm (PST). Once you start the exam, you will have 60 minutes to finish the exam.
  • Final exam is 110 minutes long and can be started in the following time windows (listed by section):
    • Phys 122A: 8:25-8:45 a.m. (PST) Wednesday, March 17, 2021
    • Phys 122B: 8:25-8:45 a.m. (PST) Monday, March 15, 2021
    • Phys 122C: 10:25-10:45 a.m. (PST) Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Note that there are no make-up exams.  So, students with outside professional, service, or career commitments (i.e. military service, ROTC, professional conference presentation, NCAA sports, etc.) conflicting with the exam dates must contact us early in the quarter to establish alternate examination procedures.  Exam scores for students who miss an exam without making prior arrangements will be zero.

Each exam is out of 100 points, and have three components:

  • 70 points on lecture material
  • 15 points on tutorial material
  • 15 points on lab material

Exams will count for 60% of your grade.  Your overall exam score will be based on the best of the following two methods:

  • Method 1: 20% from each of your midterms scores and 20% from your final exam score
  • Method 2: 20% from your best midterm score and 40% from your final exam score

We will design the exams such that a student who understands some of the material very well but needs some improvement in the remaining material should get a score around 65%.  If the class average on a given exam is less than 65%, then all the scores for that exam will be adjusted upward so that the average is 65%. Scores will not be adjusted downward even if the class average is higher than 65%.

If a student is found responsible for misconduct during an exam, a score of zero will be given for that exam for this student.  If the misconduct occurs during a midterm, only Method 1 is used to calculate the final grade, and Method 2 is not used.

Grades

You will get a grade of 0 for the entire course if either of the following criteria are met:

  • You receive 0 points for 3 or more lab assignments.
  • You receive less than 16 out of the 24 points possible on the lab assignments.

Otherwise your final weighted percentage is converted to a grade point using the following thresholds.

grade pointcourse scoregrade pointcourse scoregrade pointcourse scoregrade pointcourse score
4.092.03.076.02.060.01.044.0
3.990.42.974.41.958.40.942.4
3.888.82.872.81.856.80.840.8
3.787.22.771.21.755.20.739.2
3.685.62.669.61.653.6
3.584.02.568.01.552.0
3.482.42.466.41.450.4
3.380.82.364.81.348.8
3.279.22.263.21.247.2
3.177.62.161.61.145.6


Reading schedule

Reading schedule.

Research Study Information

This course is part of a research project  examining student reasoning ability and attitudes about physics with the goal of  improving physics teaching.  By enrolling in this course you are automatically included in the study. Early in the quarter, students will have an opportunity to learn about the study and to remove themselves from the study if they wish. Your instructor will not know whether or not you participate. Later in the quarter, the link below will become active and allow you to review the details of the study, contact a member of the research team, or remove yourself from the study.

The form link is: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/uwpeg/397178

Access and accommodation

Your experience in this class is important to us, so if you have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but are not limited to: mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical), please contact DRS to arrange accommodations.

Safe campus

We are committed to ensuring a safe environment on campus.  We encourage you to check out the resources available here.

Religious Accommodations

Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at Religious Accommodations Policy (https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/). Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the Religious Accommodations Request form (https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/).

Academic integrity and student conduct

The University takes academic integrity and student conduct very seriously.  Behaving with integrity and respect is part of our responsibility to our shared learning community.  Acts of academic misconduct may include, but are not limited to, cheating by working with others or sharing answers on exams.

Please note that screenshots or recordings of instructors, other students, and course materials during active video (Zoom) participation sessions are strictly forbidden.  Streaming or posting inappropriate materials on any course platform is also not allowed. 

All the course materials including exam and quiz questions, lecture notes, lecture videos are intellectual properties of the instructor and the University of Washington. Distributing them in any form without permission is forbidden.  

The University of Washington Student Conduct Code (WAC 478-121) defines prohibited academic and behavioral conduct and describes how the University holds students accountable as they pursue their academic goals.  Allegations of misconduct by students may be referred to the appropriate campus office for investigation and resolution.  More information can be found online at https://www.washington.edu/studentconduct/.

If you’re uncertain about if something is academic or behavioral misconduct, ask us.  we are willing to discuss questions you might have.

Sours: https://phys.washington.edu/courses/2021/winter/phys/122/a
Physics 122 Exam 2 review part 1

PHYSICS 121 UW TUTORIAL

FAQs

Are online courses worth it?

Cost is another benefit, as most online courses are much cheaper than a traditional classroom program. Tuition is usually lower and there are practically no travel costs involved. That said, online education is only worth your time if you are earning accredited online degrees from accredited colleges.

Can I study part time?

Essentially, part-time study involves spreading a full-time postgraduate course over a longer period of time. It's usually tailored for those who want to continue working while studying, and usually involves committing an afternoon or an evening each week to attend classes or lectures.

Can I add online courses to my resume?

Listing online classes on your resume is a definite do. Just make sure you do it thoughtfully so you're sending the right message about your continuing education. After all, you worked hard to complete all these courses in your free time, you owe it to yourself to make sure they count.

Are scholarships available?

Scholarships are offered by a wide array of organizations, companies, civic organizations and even small businesses. Some scholarships require students to meet specific criteria, such as a certain grade point average or extracurricular interest. Applications for scholarships should be submitted well ahead of the school enrollment deadline so students have a better idea of how much of an award, if any, they will receive.

Sours: https://www.coursef.com/physics-121-uw-tutorial

122 uw physics

.

Best of Neil deGrasse Tyson Amazing Arguments And Clever Comebacks Part 1

.

You will also like:

.



1512 1513 1514 1515 1516