Storage totes

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BRUTE&#; 14 Gal Tote with Lid, Gray

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The Rubbermaid Commercial BRUTE&#; Tote Storage Bin with Lid is a heavy-duty storage container used for storing and transporting items. Ideal for the food service industry, this NSF-certified gallon tote is ribbed for strength, features grip handles for carrying and rounded corners for easy cleaning.

Features and Benefits:

  • User-friendly grip handles decrease potential for back injury and finger strain
  • Holes in handle allow water to drain, reducing risk of bacteria build up.
  • Lid snaps tight, keeping contents secure.
  • Reinforced ribbed bottom allows product to be dragged.
  • Measures /2" x /4" x "
  • Containers stack securely for efficient use of space.
  • NSF approved

specifications

U.S.Metric
Product Length in cm
Product Width in cm
Product Height in cm
Product Weight lb kg
Upc
Case Pack Length in cm
Case Pack Width in cm
Case Pack Height in cm
Case Pack Weight lb kg
Case Pack Quantity6
Ucc
Packaging Length in cm
Packaging Width in cm
Packaging Height in cm
Packaging Weight lb kg
ColorGray
Country of OriginUSA

Documents

Material Handling Construction - Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Foodservice -Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Healthcare - Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Hospitality - Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Institutional - Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Property Management - Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Manufacturing Facilities - Sell Sheet

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Material Handling - Retail Sell Sheet

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Material Handling Entertainment & Transportation - Sell Sheet

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Certifications & Regulatory Information


<p>Proposition 65 is an initiative originally approved by CA voters to address their growing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. It became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of , better known by its original name of Proposition Prop 65 requires the State of CA to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer or birth defects or other reproductive harm, etc. The chemicals include additives or ingredients in pesticides, common household products, food, drugs, dyes, or solvents. The program is administered by The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) which is part of the CA Environmental Protection Agency. Where required, warnings must be included with the product’s labeling.</p> <p>Link:&#;<a rel="noopener" href="https://oehha.ca.gov/proposition" target="_blank">https://oehha.ca.gov/proposition</a></p>

<p>NSF International is an independent testing lab/organization in Ann Arbor, Michigan. NSF lists products which meet their criteria for cleanability and sanitation: food contact, splash zone and non-food contact, per Standards:</p> <p><strong>2:</strong> Food Equipment and Standard</p> <p><strong></strong> Manual Beverage Dispensers.</p> <p><strong></strong> Thermoplastic Refuse Containers.</p> <p>Link: <a href="https://www.nsf.org/">www.nsf.org</a></p>

<p>REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) requires substances of very high concern (SVHC) that are imported into the EU in certain quantities to be registered with European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). A list of acceptable substances is maintained and any substances on that list do not require separate registration. REACH is a globally recognized initiative and most countries now have some level of a REACH program.</p>

<p>United States Department of Agriculture Equipment Listing (Meat and Poultry and 3A Dairy Listing). Items that comply with USDA regulations via the design, construction, and materials of a product.</p> <p>Link: <a href="https://www.usda.gov/">www.usda.gov</a></p>

Related Products

Sours: https://www.rubbermaidcommercial.com/material-handling/storage/brute-totes-with-lid/

Ultra™ Totes for Ultra Storage

Storage solutions come in all shapes and sizes and can help you solve a variety of organizational challenges! However, it is important to choose the right solution for your storage needs. After all, ultra-storage needs, calls for Ultra™ Totes!

Summer Cleanup Leads to Fall Organization
After you've spent all summer working on the yard, fall is the perfect time to organize and store away all of your outdoor supplies. This will make your life much easier when spring comes around and you are trying to find the gardening tools, potting soil or lawn decorations. Sterilite's line of durable Ultra™ Totes are available in three popular sizes, 10 Gallon, 18 Gallon and 25 Gallon for a wide range of needs. The deep recessed lids offer secure stacking capabilities for efficient use of vertical space, which is extremely helpful for storing those yard supplies in the shed or basement. Additionally, the 10 and 18 Gallon Ultra™ Totes conveniently share a lid, which allows these shallow and deep totes to be stacked in the same footprint and optimize your storage space.

Cold Weather Prep
The garage is great for storing hardware tools, painting supplies, and seasonal items throughout the year. The challenge with storage in the garage or even the shed are the cold winter temperatures. Our Ultra™ Totes are made of polyethylene and designed for cold weather storage. They are impact resistant so they can take a beating without breaking, even in very cold temperatures! Channeled walls provide added strength to the totes and help to resist crushing under heavier loads. With winter only a few short months away, start organizing the garage today!

Perfect Fireside Storage
In many parts of the country it is common to have a wood burning fireplace. There is nothing better than watching Sunday afternoon football with great friends and good food in front of a warm fire. To avoid going outside each time you want to have a fire, Ultra™ Totes are perfect for storing and transporting your firewood. By securely keeping the firewood inside, it stays clean and dry for when you are ready to burn it. The heavy-duty latches on the Ultra™ Totes will keep the lid secured to the base and the integrated handles are designed for comfortable lifting and carrying. This will make transporting firewood a breeze this winter.

Using Sterilite Ultra™ Totes for your most challenging storage needs will get you through the winter months, making you an Ultra Organizer!


Optimize the limited storage space in your basement by taking advantage of the Ultra™ Totes superior stacking capabilities!

The polyethylene Ultra™ Totes are cold weather resistant making them the ideal storage solution for your garage!

By keeping firewood on hand in the mudroom, it will stay dry and easy to access throughout the winter months!
Sours: https://www.sterilite.com/Ultra-Storage.html
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The Best Storage Containers for Every Room, According to Professional Organizers

Shop the best-of-the-best with these storage recommendations from the pros.

Keep in mind: Price and stock could change after publish date, and we may make money from these links.

Walking the aisles of The Container Store makes my organization-loving heart pitter-patter, but many times I leave empty-handed, feeling lost and overwhelmed with options. With so many wonderful baskets and bins available, it's hard to choose the right one for the job.

So, I reached out to the experts and picked their brains for suggestions on the best storage containers. Of course, each decluttering strategy is different, requiring unique tools, so I listed their picks by room so that you can find the exact product to fit your needs. Read on to see the top storage containers that professional organizers recommend.

BEST STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR THE KITCHEN

BEST LARGE STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR THE GARAGE

BEST STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR THE CLOSET + BEDROOM

BEST STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR KIDS' ROOMS

BEST STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR THE BATHROOM

BEST STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR LINENS + LAUNDRY

Sours: https://www.hgtv.com/lifestyle/clean-and-organize/best-storage-boxes-and-bins
Efficient Garage Storage: DIY Storage Rack with Floating Bins!
  • We’ve reviewed this guide and continue to stand by our picks.

June 25, 2021

In the quest to tidy, storage containers can make the difference between an organized home and one heaped with mismatched boxes in the closets and garage. To find the best, we tossed 32 bins and totes down a flight of stairs, left them in the rain, and stuffed them full of books and blankets. We found seven for indoor and outdoor use that’ll keep your stuff clean, dry, and easy to access.

All of our recommended containers will stow your things safely and are easy to carry (or roll around). Our picks include clear plastic storage bins for indoor closets, a heavy-duty garage tote, cheap bins for big projects, an extra-large wheeled bin, an indestructible container that’s great for camping, an easy-access box, and zippered cloth boxes for clothes.

Why you should trust me

Assorted storage containers scattered at the foot of outdoor steps.

I’m Wirecutter’s resident textile writer and I’ve worked on our guides to closet organizing ideas, clothing irons, and ironing boards. I’m also a published quilt designer and former librarian. I’m a born organizer. I have experience maintaining entire school libraries, keeping hundreds of yards of fabric organized, and storing and cataloguing the onslaught of sheets and blankets I’ve tested for Wirecutter.

Best clear plastic storage bins: Iris Weathertight Totes

Stacked Iris storage containers with black handles.

Best for: Seeing what you’ve stored and keeping a range of everyday items from pet supplies to linens inside the home.

Why it’s great: Any closet could benefit from a few Iris Weathertight Totes. They’re sturdy and easy to use and they come in more sizes (12) than any other bins we tested. They were also the tightest-sealing clear bins we tested, thanks to a foam gasket in the lid and extra latches around the edges (most bins have only two on each end). The Irises also stack more securely—each bin’s base sits snugly into a groove on the lid of the one below. In addition, the Iris bins maximize interior space because they have straighter sides than several other bins we’ve tested.

Stacked Iris storage containers.

Iris makes similar totes for three brands: The Container Store (top), Ziploc (middle), and Home Depot (bottom). Colors and sizes vary, but they all work together as a system. Photo: Rozette Rago

A view from above a closed, clear storage container.

Strong latches keep the sides and ends of the lid securely closed. Photo: Rozette Rago

The handle latches of a clear storage container.

The large, smooth latches double as comfortable handles—especially important when the bin is full of heavy stuff. Photo: Rozette Rago

Iris manufactures the Weathertight in slightly different sizes and lid colors for The Container Store, Ziploc, and Home Depot, but you can use them all interchangeably. Staffers who have used these boxes for moving, and to store countless items over the years, highly recommend them. We also recommend the under-bed size in our guide to closet organizing.

The Weathertight Totes receive strong owner reviews, with a 4.6-star (out of five) average across almost 400 customer reviews on The Container Store’s site. We took particular note that commenters—ranging from a personal historian stowing photos and personal documents to small-apartment dwellers—rave about the watertight seal and neat stackability.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Like other polypropylene bins, they’ll become brittle in cold temperatures; we don’t recommend them for storage in a freezing garage or basement. If you live in a temperate climate you can probably get away with using these in a garage or unheated part of the house. But we wouldn’t risk it in colder climates. They chipped and lost latches in our drop tests, so look to our heavier-duty bins if you plan to treat them roughly.

Long-term test notes: Over the past two years, I’ve used the Iris test samples for everything from storing my daughter’s artwork in a closet to housing baby chicks (with a hacked lid to let air flow) until they’re old enough for our family’s chicken coop. The bins have stayed watertight when I’ve left some outside in the rain for weeks here in the Pacific Northwest, and even after they’ve lost a latch or two (which happens a lot), the seal still keeps moisture out. Several other Wirecutter staffers have used these bins for years, although a couple of people have noted that the bins can be smelly when you first get them. Because they stay so well sealed, the smell can transfer to clothes and linens inside, so one senior staff writer recommends throwing some cedar blocks in.

Sizes: 19, 30, 41, 46, 62, 74 quarts (The Container Store); 6½, 19, 30, 41, 62, 74, 103 quarts (Home Depot); 16, 26½, 44, 60 quarts (Ziploc)

Best bins for the garage, basement, and attic: Rubbermaid Brute Totes

A Rubbermaid Brute Tote sitting on a wood floor.

Best for: All-purpose storage in basements, attics, and garages.

Why it’s great: If you want bins for your garage, attic, or basement that can take a lot of abuse, we recommend the Rubbermaid Brute Totes. These containers are made with high-density polyethylene, a sturdier and more temperature-resistant plastic than the clear polypropylene containers we’ve tested, like the Iris Weathertight Totes. The Brute’s molded handles also made them more comfortable to carry than the less expensive garage bins we recommend, the Home Depot HDX. Like most bins we tried, the Brutes didn’t let water in, although in our tests, the deeply grooved lid collected a lot of water, which can attract bugs and bacteria.

A view of the top of the Brute.

The Brute’s deep lid helps it stack more securely but also allows water to pool. Photo: Rozette Rago

A view of the inside of the Brute.

The 20-gallon size we tested was big enough to hold eight throw blankets. Photo: Rozette Rago

A close-up of the Brute's handle.

The large, sturdy handles made this tote comfortable to carry—especially important for heavy loads. Photo: Rozette Rago

The Brute comes in two sizes: 14 and 20 gallons. We tested the larger size and it held 59 books or eight throw blankets. In our drop tests (down a flight of stairs), the Brute was one of our only picks to survive damage-free—the lid popped off, but the container itself was completely intact.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The Brute’s lid was tricky to open when the bin is empty but it was much easier once the bin was full of heavy books. If you need something more accessible, the butterfly lid of the Akro-Mils bins we recommend might work better.

Long-term test notes: In two years of long-term testing, we haven’t had any problems with the plastic degrading, although we have seen at least one reader comment noting that this happened to their bin. We’ve stored ours in an unheated workshop year-round, and so far the bins look new, have kept the contents dry, and prevent mice and insects from getting in.

Best cheap storage totes: Home Depot HDX Tough Storage Totes

Stacked HDX storage bins towering against a brick wall.

Best for: Organizing on a budget or large-scale projects.

Why it’s great: If you’ve decided that this is the year you’ll organize your basement and you’re looking to stock up on storage, consider Home Depot’s HDX Tough Storage Totes. They come in eight stackable sizes and they’re cheap—you can buy a dozen HDX totes for the same price as one or two of our more expensive picks. Unlike the super-durable Brute totes, the HDX bins are made with polypropylene, so they’re not as tough in extreme cold temperatures and they break more easily when dropped. But if you live in a mild climate or aren’t worried about years-long durability we recommend them for garages and basements. We even spotted them in an episode of Tidying Up with Marie Kondo in a freshly decluttered garage.

A view from above of the inside of an empty HDX.

Although you could technically use these for closet storage, they’re much bigger than the Iris totes and won’t work as well for most indoor spaces. Even the smallest, 12-gallon size is almost three times as big as the smallest Iris. The HDX totes are reliably available in Home Depot stores—many of our other picks are mostly sold online—so you can see them in person to figure out exactly which sizes you need.

The HDX totes get very strong owner reviews on Home Depot’s site, with a 4.7-star (out of five) average across over 17,000 reviews. Common praise for the boxes include that they stack easily, they’re durable, and they’re a good size for the price.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: In our drop tests, the HDX cracked and lost a small chunk of plastic. The lid stayed on, though, unlike with the Brute Totes. Though the container would probably need to be replaced after a major fall, your stuff would stay inside.

Long-term test notes: Test bins have held up after two years of long-term testing in an unheated workshop, and they seem to be pest-proof: At my house, we used to keep our animal feed bags on a shelf, but after mice began eating into them we moved them to these HDX bins, and the mouse attacks stopped completely. In addition, one Wirecutter staffer says that at her previous job people used these bins to haul AV equipment back and forth to various locations, and they were durable and comfortable to carry.

Sizes: 12, 17, 27, 38, 55 gallons

Best bin for bigger loads: Sterilite 40 Gallon Wheeled Industrial Tote

The Sterilite 40 Gallon Wheeled Industrial Tote sitting on a hard wood floor.

Best for: Oversize items or big loads that are hard to carry.

Why it’s great: The extra-large Sterilite 40 Gallon Wheeled Industrial Tote is helpful for anyone who struggles to carry heavy containers or for those who want to save multiple trips by filling one giant bin instead of several smaller ones. It’s the only bin we’ve found with wheels and a big, comfortable handle that folds down when it’s not in use. Though the HDX bins we recommend come in an even bigger size (55 gallons), they don’t have wheels. In testing we consolidated three bins of holiday decorations into the Sterilite and wheeled it into storage—quick and easy. This bin is bigger than most people probably need (and more than most wirecutter staffers we asked actually want), but if you have the space, it’ll save some backaches. It also didn’t let water in when we sprayed it with a hose.

A closeup of the Sterilite's red, sturdy handle.

The Sterilite gets a 4.6-star (out of five) average across more than 200 customer reviews on Walmart’s site. Commenters use them for everything from camping gear to storing holiday decorations.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The Sterilite is too cumbersome to carry up and down stairs. In testing the wheels did pop off of this bin—we think that’s due to the sheer weight and size of something this big taking a tumble down a flight of stairs—but we easily reattached them. The container was otherwise undamaged. It’s usually sold in a two-pack (Sterilite told us that it sells the bins to retailers in pairs), which may be more storage than many people need. If you do plan on packing one of these full to the brim, be mindful of weight (we’d recommend things like clothes and decorations over documents and dry goods).

Long-term test notes: I’ve used these bins to pack away all of our family’s holiday decorations for three seasons now, and the wheels, handles, and latches have held up to an increasingly large amount of stuff packed inside, in addition to surviving being dragged up and down a hill and across our gravel drive (our storage room is outside). The bins keep everything dry and secure, and they’ve made digging out the holiday decorations much more pleasant every year. One note: I noticed that while the bin was empty and in storage over this past holiday season, a critter got in and chewed up a small box. This is the first such problem we’ve had, but I’d stuffed the bin so full last year that the lid bent upward, leaving an air gap. So this one is the result of my own user error, not a fault with the bin itself.

Best camping storage bin: Rubbermaid 24 Gallon ActionPacker

The Rubbermaid ActionPacker viewed from the front.

Best for: Keeping things secured and safe outside.

Why it’s great: Take the Rubbermaid 24 Gallon ActionPacker camping or throw it in the back of your truck—it’s the best storage container we found for outdoor use. Nothing we tested, including the smaller and larger ActionPacker sizes, beat the 24-gallon size for its combination of durability, security, and portability. In our drop tests, it outperformed everything else we tried. After we threw it down the stairs, a few corners were a bit dented but the latches held and the lid stayed tightly closed. It’s also our only pick that can be padlocked.

The ActionPacker’s deep, rounded handles make it easier on the hands than the Brute, Roughneck, and HDX bins we tested, and the 24-gallon size is much easier to haul around than its big sibling, the 35-gallon ActionPacker.

A view of the ActionPacker's ribbed top that prevents water pooling.

The ActionPacker’s lid was one of the few we tested that didn’t allow water to pool, so it’s ideal for outdoor use. Photo: Rozette Rago

A closeup of the ActionPacker's lock hole that enables the use of a padlock.

It was the only bin we found that lets you use a padlock for extra security. Photo: Rozette Rago

A view of the inside of the Rubbermaid 24 Gallon ActionPacker.

Like many bins we tried, the molded plastic wastes some interior space. Photo: Rozette Rago

We prefer it to the Brute and HDX bins for long-term outdoor storage, too—those bins have lids with raised lips that help them stack securely but also allow water to collect. If the ActionPacker is sitting outside for long periods, water will run off, so the lid won’t turn into a putrid pool (where bacteria and bugs can fester). This bin is made with durable HDPE, so it will withstand weather better than many others we tested.

On REI’s site, the ActionPacker receives an average of 4.4 stars (out of five) across more than 100 reviews. Many commenters seem to use the box as storage. We saw several commenters saying they’ve used the ActionPacker for years and that it’s held up through all types of weather.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Because of the thick plastic and bulky design, it doesn’t make the most efficient use of the space inside, which is why we don’t recommend it for everyday garage storage.

Long-term test notes: We know these bins can survive tremendous wear and tear. Staffers have kept them outside for years in all kinds of weather (one senior editor has stored hers outdoors in both Los Angeles and in Maine). And one of our two-year-old test samples survived a bear attack last year and is still going strong. The bear stole the bin from outside my chicken coop, dropped it on the latched side until it popped open, and made off with some chicken food. The only lasting damage was a small puncture hole from one of the bear’s claws. The latch still works perfectly, and if I had padlocked the bin (the lock was purchased but sitting in the house forgotten), I’m pretty confident the bear would have failed in its quest for food.

Easiest to open: Akro-Mils KeepBox Attached Lid Container

The Akro-Mils KeepBox Attached Lid Container

Best for: Convenient, easy-to-open storage when bugs and leaks aren’t a concern.

Why it’s great: The Akro-Mils KeepBox Attached Lid Container is the most convenient bin for anyone who struggles with tight lids. The lid has no latches to secure it—its two halves just lift open—so it’s easier to open than any other we tested. The flip-top (also called a butterfly lid) is attached to the container, so it’s also ideal for anyone who tends to misplace container lids. The KeepBox was just as sturdy as the one other butterfly-lid bin we tried (the Quantum QDC2115-12) but about half the price and more widely available. We also like that the KeepBox is clear so you can easily see what’s inside. We’ve seen the KeepBox used to store everything from Legos to home-birthing supplies.

This style of container is used for industrial shipping because it can take a beating and it stacks neatly. It’s made of a polypropylene and HDPE blend, so it’s stronger than the clear polypropylene Iris Weathertight Totes. In our drop tests we didn’t see any damage to the plastic, but the loose lid did fly open. To ensure the lid stays shut on things you want to store long-term, these bins have eyelets at their connection point that can perfectly hold a zip tie. One of our staffers has owned several of these bins for years, so we know they hold up over time.

The KeepBox receives an average of 4.6 stars (out of five) across over 2,000 owner reviews on Amazon. One reviewer uses them to stow Legos, and we saw several mentions of people keeping craft supplies in the boxes. We did note some complaints about the boxes cracking but it wasn’t an overwhelming complaint.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: This is the only plastic container we recommend that let water in when we hosed it down. Water gets in, and bugs can probably also climb in. This isn’t the bin to use to protect your stuff against the elements.

Long-term test notes: We still think these are the best easy-access bins, and although they don’t seal as tightly as our other picks, I was surprised to see how dry, dust-free, and pest-free our test Akro-Mils bin stayed after a year in my storage room. Also, our family used to store pellet litter for my 8-year-old daughter’s indoor rabbits in an Iris Weathertight Tote, and she never reattached the lid because the six latches were too tricky; instead, she frequently left it tossed aside somewhere, which meant stray litter ended up all over the carpet. I switched to the Akro-Mils bin last year, and now she can easily manage the lid—and we never have carpet spills. It’s a secure, accessible alternative to latched bins.

Best cloth storage bins: iWill Create Pro Storage Box with Zipper Lid

A front view of iWill Dustproof Clothes Storage Boxes stacked one on top fo the other.

Best for: Seasonal and long-term clothes storage.

Why it’s great: The breathable, zippered iWill Create Pro Storage Box with Zipper Lid is a simple, inexpensive way to store and protect clothes. It’s perfect for garments that need airflow, like wool sweaters (just keep in mind that they aren’t moth-proof). We also like the iWill for items like scarves and belts—accessories you don’t use every day but still want ready access to. We tested three cloth storage containers and the iWill’s zippered top and structured sides made it the easiest to use. Retrieving items was much less frustrating than with the smaller and more expensive front-loading Container Store Sweater Box, which had to be completely emptied to pull out one thing. We also tried the Sorbus Foldable Bags but they were so floppy that filling them was a challenge—the iWill’s rigid sides were much easier to pack.

a view of the inside of the iWill.

The iWill’s rigid sides and large opening make it easier to fill up than floppier boxes. Photo: Rozette Rago

A closeup of the fabric and zipper of a cloth storage container.

The breathable fabric and zipper are ideal for protecting clothes from dust, although they may not keep out moths. Photo: Rozette Rago

a close-up of the iWill’s handles.

The iWill’s handles made the containers easier to move around a closet or grab off of a high shelf than others we tested that lacked handles. Photo: Rozette Rago

The Iris Weathertight Totes we recommend will also work in your clothes closet and they’re clear, so you can see what’s inside, but we prefer the iWill’s zippered closure to the Iris’s heavy latches, which can feel like overkill when you just want to grab something. We also think the iWill containers are a good-looking storage option for any area where you’ll have to look at them frequently; we’ve seen commenters on Amazon who use them to store weights in a living room, linens in a hall closet, and odds and ends in a car.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The iWill doesn’t have a slot for a label and because the container is opaque identifying what’s inside is difficult. We tried to attach a few sticky labels but they fell off immediately, so we think a marker or a good memory is the best way to keep track of what’s inside.

Long-term test notes: I’ve used the test samples for two years, and they do a solid job of keeping everything inside clean. They fit neatly on my closet shelves, but they’re not firm enough to stack if I fill them with anything bulky or heavy. They’ve withstood a lot of handling as I take them on and off the shelves, and I appreciate that each lid zips completely open, which makes it easy for me to see everything I’ve stored and to add more stuff.

Size: 17.6 by 13.6 by 9.7 inches

How we picked and tested

To find a range of containers that work for a variety of needs we researched a total of 82 bins and used these criteria to narrow the field:

Holds a lot: We considered bins that would neatly and securely hold a variety of items and stack without wobbling. Organizer Beth Penn told us to look for the squarest bins possible to maximize the space inside.

Widely available: A helpful storage bin is one that’s easy to buy. Some popular bins were hard to find, so we focused on containers sold by multiple retailers or sellers with reliable inventory. Sometimes you need to see a container in person, so we also looked for options that could be picked up in store.

Durable: All bins should have closures that work consistently and materials that won’t break or tear with everyday use. Not every bin needs to withstand heavy abuse, so we also considered some that were less durable but highly practical for storage. Our plastic picks are made with polypropylene (labeled PP, the most common plastic we found) or high-density polyethylene (HDPE, for heavy-duty containers). Both PP (PDF) and HDPE (PDF) will degrade eventually from exposure to oxygen and UV from sunshine—which can cause discoloration—but the bigger concern is cold. Polypropylene can become brittle at just below freezing, which is why we don’t recommend PP bins for storage in an unheated basement or garage. Instead, choose HDPE bins, which won’t become brittle until nearly –100 degrees Fahrenheit. Neither material should be affected by the hottest outdoor temperatures—weaker PP doesn’t break down until about 176 degrees Fahrenheit.

Easy to carry: We tested for handles that didn’t hurt our hands and lids that didn’t dig into our stomachs when carrying a full box.

In 2015 we tested 11 bins; for our 2019 update we tested 21, in a range of sizes. Over the years we’ve simulated flooding and water leaks by hosing the bins down, submerging them in a kiddie pool, and leaving them out in the rain overnight. We’ve dropped them and tossed them down flights of stairs (which, we’ve found, is relaxing and pretty good for stress relief). If a container survived those tests, we filled it with household goods to see how much it held, if it closed when overstuffed, if it stacked securely, and how comfortable it was to carry. We filled clothing boxes with sweaters and hoodies, noting how much the boxes held and how easy they were to pack and empty.

A note about labeling

We recommend investing in a label maker. Labels are easy to remove and replace if you decide to repurpose a box. If you still prefer writing on the bins, we suggest dry-erase markers instead of Sharpies, particularly on clear storage containers. A quick pass with a wet wipe or magic eraser will take off the marker so you can reuse the box. Penn also suggests keeping an index inside the closet so you’ll never forget what you’re storing.

The best way to label your stuff

  • The Best Label Maker

    The Best Label Maker

    We printed dozens of labels while testing the top seven label makers to find the best one to organize your office, kitchen, media cabinet, and more.

The competition

2019 testing

Indoor storage

We like the Sterilite Ultra Latch containers, and used to recommend them, but they’re harder to find and come in fewer sizes than the Iris Weathertight Totes.

The lids on the IKEA Sockerbit Boxes don’t latch, which made the boxes uncomfortable to carry and less useful than our picks.

Heavy-duty containers

Rubbermaid’s Roughneck Totes, which we tested in 18-gallon, 10-gallon, and 3-gallon sizes, are excellent, and a favorite with a lot of our staff. They’re just really hard to find.

Attached-lid containers

The Quantum QDC2115-12 storage containers were very similar to the Akro-Mils KeepBox in testing but they aren’t clear and they cost a lot more.

Closet storage boxes

2015 testing

Even when empty, the now discontinued Sterilite 25-Gallon Ultra Tote was warped. Our recommendations are better-made.

More ways to store your stuff

Sources

  1. Beth Penn, home organizer and founder of Bneato Bar, email interview, December 27, 2018

  2. Ductile/Brittle Transition Temperature, Omnexus by SpecialChem

  3. Rebeca S. Grecco Romano, Washington Luiz Oliani, Duclerc Fernandes Parra, and Ademar Benevolo Lugao, Effects of Environmental Aging in Propylene Obtained by Injection Molding, AIP Conference Proceedings 1914, December 15, 2017

  4. P.C. Lodi, B.S. Bueno, and J.G. Zornberg, UV Degradation of HDPE and PVC Geomembranes in Laboratory Exposure (PDF), proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Geosynthetics, May 1, 2010

  5. Peter Dunn, Why Do Plastics Get Brittle When They Get Cold?, MIT School of Engineering, June 2, 2009

About your guide

Jackie Reeve

Jackie Reeve is a senior staff writer covering bedding, organization, and home goods at Wirecutter since 2015. Previously she was a school librarian, and she’s been a quilter for about 15 years. Her quilt patterns and her other written work have appeared in various publications. She moderates Wirecutter’s staff book club and makes her bed every morning.

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-storage-containers/

Totes storage

  • We’ve reviewed this guide and continue to stand by our picks.

June 25,

In the quest to tidy, storage containers can make the difference between an organized home and one heaped with mismatched boxes in the closets and garage. To find the best, we tossed 32 bins and totes down a flight of stairs, left them in the rain, and stuffed them full of books and blankets. We found seven for indoor and outdoor use that’ll keep your stuff clean, dry, and easy to access.

All of our recommended containers will stow your things safely and are easy to carry (or roll around). Our picks include clear plastic storage bins for indoor closets, a heavy-duty garage tote, cheap bins for big projects, an extra-large wheeled bin, an indestructible container that’s great for camping, an easy-access box, and zippered cloth boxes for clothes.

Why you should trust me

Assorted storage containers scattered at the foot of outdoor steps.

I’m Wirecutter’s resident textile writer and I’ve worked on our guides to closet organizing ideas, clothing irons, and ironing boards. I’m also a published quilt designer and former librarian. I’m a born organizer. I have experience maintaining entire school libraries, keeping hundreds of yards of fabric organized, and storing and cataloguing the onslaught of sheets and blankets I’ve tested for Wirecutter.

Best clear plastic storage bins: Iris Weathertight Totes

Stacked Iris storage containers with black handles.

Best for: Seeing what you’ve stored and keeping a range of everyday items from pet supplies to linens inside the home.

Why it’s great: Any closet could benefit from a few Iris Weathertight Totes. They’re sturdy and easy to use and they come in more sizes (12) than any other bins we tested. They were also the tightest-sealing clear bins we tested, thanks to a foam gasket in the lid and extra latches around the edges (most bins have only two on each end). The Irises also stack more securely—each bin’s base sits snugly into a groove on the lid of the one below. In addition, the Iris bins maximize interior space because they have straighter sides than several other bins we’ve tested.

Stacked Iris storage containers.

Iris makes similar totes for three brands: The Container Store (top), Ziploc (middle), and Home Depot (bottom). Colors and sizes vary, but they all work together as a system. Photo: Rozette Rago

A view from above a closed, clear storage container.

Strong latches keep the sides and ends of the lid securely closed. Photo: Rozette Rago

The handle latches of a clear storage container.

The large, smooth latches double as comfortable handles—especially important when the bin is full of heavy stuff. Photo: Rozette Rago

Iris manufactures the Weathertight in slightly different sizes and lid colors for The Container Store, Ziploc, and Home Depot, but you can use them all interchangeably. Staffers who have used these boxes for moving, and to store countless items over the years, highly recommend them. We also recommend the under-bed size in our guide to closet organizing.

The Weathertight Totes receive strong owner reviews, with a star (out of five) average across almost customer reviews on The Container Store’s site. We took particular note that commenters—ranging from a personal historian stowing photos and personal documents to small-apartment dwellers—rave about the watertight seal and neat stackability.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Like other polypropylene bins, they’ll become brittle in cold temperatures; we don’t recommend them for storage in a freezing garage or basement. If you live in a temperate climate you can probably get away with using these in a garage or unheated part of the house. But we wouldn’t risk it in colder climates. They chipped and lost latches in our drop tests, so look to our heavier-duty bins if you plan to treat them roughly.

Long-term test notes: Over the past two years, I’ve used the Iris test samples for everything from storing my daughter’s artwork in a closet to housing baby chicks (with a hacked lid to let air flow) until they’re old enough for our family’s chicken coop. The bins have stayed watertight when I’ve left some outside in the rain for weeks here in the Pacific Northwest, and even after they’ve lost a latch or two (which happens a lot), the seal still keeps moisture out. Several other Wirecutter staffers have used these bins for years, although a couple of people have noted that the bins can be smelly when you first get them. Because they stay so well sealed, the smell can transfer to clothes and linens inside, so one senior staff writer recommends throwing some cedar blocks in.

Sizes: 19, 30, 41, 46, 62, 74 quarts (The Container Store); 6½, 19, 30, 41, 62, 74, quarts (Home Depot); 16, 26½, 44, 60 quarts (Ziploc)

Best bins for the garage, basement, and attic: Rubbermaid Brute Totes

A Rubbermaid Brute Tote sitting on a wood floor.

Best for: All-purpose storage in basements, attics, and garages.

Why it’s great: If you want bins for your garage, attic, or basement that can take a lot of abuse, we recommend the Rubbermaid Brute Totes. These containers are made with high-density polyethylene, a sturdier and more temperature-resistant plastic than the clear polypropylene containers we’ve tested, like the Iris Weathertight Totes. The Brute’s molded handles also made them more comfortable to carry than the less expensive garage bins we recommend, the Home Depot HDX. Like most bins we tried, the Brutes didn’t let water in, although in our tests, the deeply grooved lid collected a lot of water, which can attract bugs and bacteria.

A view of the top of the Brute.

The Brute’s deep lid helps it stack more securely but also allows water to pool. Photo: Rozette Rago

A view of the inside of the Brute.

The gallon size we tested was big enough to hold eight throw blankets. Photo: Rozette Rago

A close-up of the Brute's handle.

The large, sturdy handles made this tote comfortable to carry—especially important for heavy loads. Photo: Rozette Rago

The Brute comes in two sizes: 14 and 20 gallons. We tested the larger size and it held 59 books or eight throw blankets. In our drop tests (down a flight of stairs), the Brute was one of our only picks to survive damage-free—the lid popped off, but the container itself was completely intact.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The Brute’s lid was tricky to open when the bin is empty but it was much easier once the bin was full of heavy books. If you need something more accessible, the butterfly lid of the Akro-Mils bins we recommend might work better.

Long-term test notes: In two years of long-term testing, we haven’t had any problems with the plastic degrading, although we have seen at least one reader comment noting that this happened to their bin. We’ve stored ours in an unheated workshop year-round, and so far the bins look new, have kept the contents dry, and prevent mice and insects from getting in.

Best cheap storage totes: Home Depot HDX Tough Storage Totes

Stacked HDX storage bins towering against a brick wall.

Best for: Organizing on a budget or large-scale projects.

Why it’s great: If you’ve decided that this is the year you’ll organize your basement and you’re looking to stock up on storage, consider Home Depot’s HDX Tough Storage Totes. They come in eight stackable sizes and they’re cheap—you can buy a dozen HDX totes for the same price as one or two of our more expensive picks. Unlike the super-durable Brute totes, the HDX bins are made with polypropylene, so they’re not as tough in extreme cold temperatures and they break more easily when dropped. But if you live in a mild climate or aren’t worried about years-long durability we recommend them for garages and basements. We even spotted them in an episode of Tidying Up with Marie Kondo in a freshly decluttered garage.

A view from above of the inside of an empty HDX.

Although you could technically use these for closet storage, they’re much bigger than the Iris totes and won’t work as well for most indoor spaces. Even the smallest, gallon size is almost three times as big as the smallest Iris. The HDX totes are reliably available in Home Depot stores—many of our other picks are mostly sold online—so you can see them in person to figure out exactly which sizes you need.

The HDX totes get very strong owner reviews on Home Depot’s site, with a star (out of five) average across over 17, reviews. Common praise for the boxes include that they stack easily, they’re durable, and they’re a good size for the price.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: In our drop tests, the HDX cracked and lost a small chunk of plastic. The lid stayed on, though, unlike with the Brute Totes. Though the container would probably need to be replaced after a major fall, your stuff would stay inside.

Long-term test notes: Test bins have held up after two years of long-term testing in an unheated workshop, and they seem to be pest-proof: At my house, we used to keep our animal feed bags on a shelf, but after mice began eating into them we moved them to these HDX bins, and the mouse attacks stopped completely. In addition, one Wirecutter staffer says that at her previous job people used these bins to haul AV equipment back and forth to various locations, and they were durable and comfortable to carry.

Sizes: 12, 17, 27, 38, 55 gallons

Best bin for bigger loads: Sterilite 40 Gallon Wheeled Industrial Tote

The Sterilite 40 Gallon Wheeled Industrial Tote sitting on a hard wood floor.

Best for: Oversize items or big loads that are hard to carry.

Why it’s great: The extra-large Sterilite 40 Gallon Wheeled Industrial Tote is helpful for anyone who struggles to carry heavy containers or for those who want to save multiple trips by filling one giant bin instead of several smaller ones. It’s the only bin we’ve found with wheels and a big, comfortable handle that folds down when it’s not in use. Though the HDX bins we recommend come in an even bigger size (55 gallons), they don’t have wheels. In testing we consolidated three bins of holiday decorations into the Sterilite and wheeled it into storage—quick and easy. This bin is bigger than most people probably need (and more than most wirecutter staffers we asked actually want), but if you have the space, it’ll save some backaches. It also didn’t let water in when we sprayed it with a hose.

A closeup of the Sterilite's red, sturdy handle.

The Sterilite gets a star (out of five) average across more than customer reviews on Walmart’s site. Commenters use them for everything from camping gear to storing holiday decorations.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The Sterilite is too cumbersome to carry up and down stairs. In testing the wheels did pop off of this bin—we think that’s due to the sheer weight and size of something this big taking a tumble down a flight of stairs—but we easily reattached them. The container was otherwise undamaged. It’s usually sold in a two-pack (Sterilite told us that it sells the bins to retailers in pairs), which may be more storage than many people need. If you do plan on packing one of these full to the brim, be mindful of weight (we’d recommend things like clothes and decorations over documents and dry goods).

Long-term test notes: I’ve used these bins to pack away all of our family’s holiday decorations for three seasons now, and the wheels, handles, and latches have held up to an increasingly large amount of stuff packed inside, in addition to surviving being dragged up and down a hill and across our gravel drive (our storage room is outside). The bins keep everything dry and secure, and they’ve made digging out the holiday decorations much more pleasant every year. One note: I noticed that while the bin was empty and in storage over this past holiday season, a critter got in and chewed up a small box. This is the first such problem we’ve had, but I’d stuffed the bin so full last year that the lid bent upward, leaving an air gap. So this one is the result of my own user error, not a fault with the bin itself.

Best camping storage bin: Rubbermaid 24 Gallon ActionPacker

The Rubbermaid ActionPacker viewed from the front.

Best for: Keeping things secured and safe outside.

Why it’s great: Take the Rubbermaid 24 Gallon ActionPacker camping or throw it in the back of your truck—it’s the best storage container we found for outdoor use. Nothing we tested, including the smaller and larger ActionPacker sizes, beat the gallon size for its combination of durability, security, and portability. In our drop tests, it outperformed everything else we tried. After we threw it down the stairs, a few corners were a bit dented but the latches held and the lid stayed tightly closed. It’s also our only pick that can be padlocked.

The ActionPacker’s deep, rounded handles make it easier on the hands than the Brute, Roughneck, and HDX bins we tested, and the gallon size is much easier to haul around than its big sibling, the gallon ActionPacker.

A view of the ActionPacker's ribbed top that prevents water pooling.

The ActionPacker’s lid was one of the few we tested that didn’t allow water to pool, so it’s ideal for outdoor use. Photo: Rozette Rago

A closeup of the ActionPacker's lock hole that enables the use of a padlock.

It was the only bin we found that lets you use a padlock for extra security. Photo: Rozette Rago

A view of the inside of the Rubbermaid 24 Gallon ActionPacker.

Like many bins we tried, the molded plastic wastes some interior space. Photo: Rozette Rago

We prefer it to the Brute and HDX bins for long-term outdoor storage, too—those bins have lids with raised lips that help them stack securely but also allow water to collect. If the ActionPacker is sitting outside for long periods, water will run off, so the lid won’t turn into a putrid pool (where bacteria and bugs can fester). This bin is made with durable HDPE, so it will withstand weather better than many others we tested.

On REI’s site, the ActionPacker receives an average of stars (out of five) across more than reviews. Many commenters seem to use the box as storage. We saw several commenters saying they’ve used the ActionPacker for years and that it’s held up through all types of weather.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Because of the thick plastic and bulky design, it doesn’t make the most efficient use of the space inside, which is why we don’t recommend it for everyday garage storage.

Long-term test notes: We know these bins can survive tremendous wear and tear. Staffers have kept them outside for years in all kinds of weather (one senior editor has stored hers outdoors in both Los Angeles and in Maine). And one of our two-year-old test samples survived a bear attack last year and is still going strong. The bear stole the bin from outside my chicken coop, dropped it on the latched side until it popped open, and made off with some chicken food. The only lasting damage was a small puncture hole from one of the bear’s claws. The latch still works perfectly, and if I had padlocked the bin (the lock was purchased but sitting in the house forgotten), I’m pretty confident the bear would have failed in its quest for food.

Easiest to open: Akro-Mils KeepBox Attached Lid Container

The Akro-Mils KeepBox Attached Lid Container

Best for: Convenient, easy-to-open storage when bugs and leaks aren’t a concern.

Why it’s great: The Akro-Mils KeepBox Attached Lid Container is the most convenient bin for anyone who struggles with tight lids. The lid has no latches to secure it—its two halves just lift open—so it’s easier to open than any other we tested. The flip-top (also called a butterfly lid) is attached to the container, so it’s also ideal for anyone who tends to misplace container lids. The KeepBox was just as sturdy as the one other butterfly-lid bin we tried (the Quantum QDC) but about half the price and more widely available. We also like that the KeepBox is clear so you can easily see what’s inside. We’ve seen the KeepBox used to store everything from Legos to home-birthing supplies.

This style of container is used for industrial shipping because it can take a beating and it stacks neatly. It’s made of a polypropylene and HDPE blend, so it’s stronger than the clear polypropylene Iris Weathertight Totes. In our drop tests we didn’t see any damage to the plastic, but the loose lid did fly open. To ensure the lid stays shut on things you want to store long-term, these bins have eyelets at their connection point that can perfectly hold a zip tie. One of our staffers has owned several of these bins for years, so we know they hold up over time.

The KeepBox receives an average of stars (out of five) across over 2, owner reviews on Amazon. One reviewer uses them to stow Legos, and we saw several mentions of people keeping craft supplies in the boxes. We did note some complaints about the boxes cracking but it wasn’t an overwhelming complaint.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: This is the only plastic container we recommend that let water in when we hosed it down. Water gets in, and bugs can probably also climb in. This isn’t the bin to use to protect your stuff against the elements.

Long-term test notes: We still think these are the best easy-access bins, and although they don’t seal as tightly as our other picks, I was surprised to see how dry, dust-free, and pest-free our test Akro-Mils bin stayed after a year in my storage room. Also, our family used to store pellet litter for my 8-year-old daughter’s indoor rabbits in an Iris Weathertight Tote, and she never reattached the lid because the six latches were too tricky; instead, she frequently left it tossed aside somewhere, which meant stray litter ended up all over the carpet. I switched to the Akro-Mils bin last year, and now she can easily manage the lid—and we never have carpet spills. It’s a secure, accessible alternative to latched bins.

Best cloth storage bins: iWill Create Pro Storage Box with Zipper Lid

A front view of iWill Dustproof Clothes Storage Boxes stacked one on top fo the other.

Best for: Seasonal and long-term clothes storage.

Why it’s great: The breathable, zippered iWill Create Pro Storage Box with Zipper Lid is a simple, inexpensive way to store and protect clothes. It’s perfect for garments that need airflow, like wool sweaters (just keep in mind that they aren’t moth-proof). We also like the iWill for items like scarves and belts—accessories you don’t use every day but still want ready access to. We tested three cloth storage containers and the iWill’s zippered top and structured sides made it the easiest to use. Retrieving items was much less frustrating than with the smaller and more expensive front-loading Container Store Sweater Box, which had to be completely emptied to pull out one thing. We also tried the Sorbus Foldable Bags but they were so floppy that filling them was a challenge—the iWill’s rigid sides were much easier to pack.

a view of the inside of the iWill.

The iWill’s rigid sides and large opening make it easier to fill up than floppier boxes. Photo: Rozette Rago

A closeup of the fabric and zipper of a cloth storage container.

The breathable fabric and zipper are ideal for protecting clothes from dust, although they may not keep out moths. Photo: Rozette Rago

a close-up of the iWill’s handles.

The iWill’s handles made the containers easier to move around a closet or grab off of a high shelf than others we tested that lacked handles. Photo: Rozette Rago

The Iris Weathertight Totes we recommend will also work in your clothes closet and they’re clear, so you can see what’s inside, but we prefer the iWill’s zippered closure to the Iris’s heavy latches, which can feel like overkill when you just want to grab something. We also think the iWill containers are a good-looking storage option for any area where you’ll have to look at them frequently; we’ve seen commenters on Amazon who use them to store weights in a living room, linens in a hall closet, and odds and ends in a car.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: The iWill doesn’t have a slot for a label and because the container is opaque identifying what’s inside is difficult. We tried to attach a few sticky labels but they fell off immediately, so we think a marker or a good memory is the best way to keep track of what’s inside.

Long-term test notes: I’ve used the test samples for two years, and they do a solid job of keeping everything inside clean. They fit neatly on my closet shelves, but they’re not firm enough to stack if I fill them with anything bulky or heavy. They’ve withstood a lot of handling as I take them on and off the shelves, and I appreciate that each lid zips completely open, which makes it easy for me to see everything I’ve stored and to add more stuff.

Size: by by inches

How we picked and tested

To find a range of containers that work for a variety of needs we researched a total of 82 bins and used these criteria to narrow the field:

Holds a lot: We considered bins that would neatly and securely hold a variety of items and stack without wobbling. Organizer Beth Penn told us to look for the squarest bins possible to maximize the space inside.

Widely available: A helpful storage bin is one that’s easy to buy. Some popular bins were hard to find, so we focused on containers sold by multiple retailers or sellers with reliable inventory. Sometimes you need to see a container in person, so we also looked for options that could be picked up in store.

Durable: All bins should have closures that work consistently and materials that won’t break or tear with everyday use. Not every bin needs to withstand heavy abuse, so we also considered some that were less durable but highly practical for storage. Our plastic picks are made with polypropylene (labeled PP, the most common plastic we found) or high-density polyethylene (HDPE, for heavy-duty containers). Both PP (PDF) and HDPE (PDF) will degrade eventually from exposure to oxygen and UV from sunshine—which can cause discoloration—but the bigger concern is cold. Polypropylene can become brittle at just below freezing, which is why we don’t recommend PP bins for storage in an unheated basement or garage. Instead, choose HDPE bins, which won’t become brittle until nearly – degrees Fahrenheit. Neither material should be affected by the hottest outdoor temperatures—weaker PP doesn’t break down until about degrees Fahrenheit.

Easy to carry: We tested for handles that didn’t hurt our hands and lids that didn’t dig into our stomachs when carrying a full box.

In we tested 11 bins; for our update we tested 21, in a range of sizes. Over the years we’ve simulated flooding and water leaks by hosing the bins down, submerging them in a kiddie pool, and leaving them out in the rain overnight. We’ve dropped them and tossed them down flights of stairs (which, we’ve found, is relaxing and pretty good for stress relief). If a container survived those tests, we filled it with household goods to see how much it held, if it closed when overstuffed, if it stacked securely, and how comfortable it was to carry. We filled clothing boxes with sweaters and hoodies, noting how much the boxes held and how easy they were to pack and empty.

A note about labeling

We recommend investing in a label maker. Labels are easy to remove and replace if you decide to repurpose a box. If you still prefer writing on the bins, we suggest dry-erase markers instead of Sharpies, particularly on clear storage containers. A quick pass with a wet wipe or magic eraser will take off the marker so you can reuse the box. Penn also suggests keeping an index inside the closet so you’ll never forget what you’re storing.

The best way to label your stuff

  • The Best Label Maker

    The Best Label Maker

    We printed dozens of labels while testing the top seven label makers to find the best one to organize your office, kitchen, media cabinet, and more.

The competition

testing

Indoor storage

We like the Sterilite Ultra Latch containers, and used to recommend them, but they’re harder to find and come in fewer sizes than the Iris Weathertight Totes.

The lids on the IKEA Sockerbit Boxes don’t latch, which made the boxes uncomfortable to carry and less useful than our picks.

Heavy-duty containers

Rubbermaid’s Roughneck Totes, which we tested in gallon, gallon, and 3-gallon sizes, are excellent, and a favorite with a lot of our staff. They’re just really hard to find.

Attached-lid containers

The Quantum QDC storage containers were very similar to the Akro-Mils KeepBox in testing but they aren’t clear and they cost a lot more.

Closet storage boxes

testing

Even when empty, the now discontinued Sterilite Gallon Ultra Tote was warped. Our recommendations are better-made.

More ways to store your stuff

Sources

  1. Beth Penn, home organizer and founder of Bneato Bar, email interview, December 27,

  2. Ductile/Brittle Transition Temperature, Omnexus by SpecialChem

  3. Rebeca S. Grecco Romano, Washington Luiz Oliani, Duclerc Fernandes Parra, and Ademar Benevolo Lugao, Effects of Environmental Aging in Propylene Obtained by Injection Molding, AIP Conference Proceedings , December 15,

  4. P.C. Lodi, B.S. Bueno, and J.G. Zornberg, UV Degradation of HDPE and PVC Geomembranes in Laboratory Exposure (PDF), proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Geosynthetics, May 1,

  5. Peter Dunn, Why Do Plastics Get Brittle When They Get Cold?, MIT School of Engineering, June 2,

About your guide

Jackie Reeve

Jackie Reeve is a senior staff writer covering bedding, organization, and home goods at Wirecutter since Previously she was a school librarian, and she’s been a quilter for about 15 years. Her quilt patterns and her other written work have appeared in various publications. She moderates Wirecutter’s staff book club and makes her bed every morning.

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-storage-containers/
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