Recoil dampening systems

Recoil dampening systems DEFAULT

US5353681A - Recoil dampening device for large caliber weapons - Google Patents

This invention relates to the field of firearms. More particularly, it relates to a recoil dampening device for large caliber, shoulder-fired weapons.

Large caliber weapons produce significant recoil upon firing. The recoil produced by the such that a standard rifle chambered for this cartridge cannot be fired directly from the shoulder without a significant risk of recoil-induced injury to the shooter. However, in recent years, the popularity of the .50 BMG cartridge has risen among hobbyists, the para-military, as well as in various branches of the armed forces. Private manufacturers, such as Research Armament Industries and Barrett Firearms Manufacturing, Inc. have produced shoulder-fired rifles chambered for .50 BMG that incorporate various recoil absorbing devices. While these weapons have enjoyed a degree of popularity among hobbyists, the .50 BMG likely represents the upper threshold of recoil absorbance for these weapons. For instance, it is not likely that the recoil-absorbing technology within conventional weapons could easily be adapted to a shoulder-fired rifle chambered for the 20 mm Vulcan round or even the 14.5 mm Russian cartridge. What is needed is a recoil dampening device that would allow a shooter to shoulder-fire a rifle chambered for a cartridge as small as the .50 BMG cartridge or as large as the 20 mm Vulcan cartridge.

It is known that recoil is a result of the force generated by the gases that propel the projectile, or bullet, out of a weapon's barrel. The recoil force experienced by the shooter of a conventional weapon is a product of the acceleration of the recoil impulse generated by these gases and the amount of time that the recoil impulse is experienced by the shooter. In a conventional weapon this amount of time is approximately the time that elapses while the gases are expanding out of the barrel, i.e. the time necessary for the projectile to leave the open end of the barrel. In a conventional weapon this is approximately three milliseconds.

In U.S. Pat. No. 2,679,192, which issued on May 25, 1954, F. H. Seely et al. disclosed an invention entitled RECOIL REDUCING DEVICE FOR FIREARMS. Seely's recoil reducing device was a gas-operated device designed to apply a force, roughly equal to the amount of recoil, to the end of the barrel in the opposite direction from the recoil force. This was intended to cancel out the recoil force experienced by the shooter.

In U.S. Pat. No. 3,018,694, which issued on Jan. 30, 1962, V. A. Browning disclosed an invention entitled RECOIL ABSORBING MECHANISM FOR FIREARMS. Browning's device was a gas operated device designed to minimize recoil.

In U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,105,411 and 3,115,063, which issued on Oct. 1, 1963 and Dec. 24, 1963, respectively, Mr. Browning disclosed recoil absorbing mechanisms that were frictionally operated. Each of the Browning devices were designed to rapidly increase the resistance to the recoil over the period of time that the recoil forces were operating on the weapon, and thus initiate a progressive slowing down of the recoil movement. Thus, the Browning devices were dynamic in the sense that the recoil absorbance of the devices increased over time. Each of the Browning devices were coaxial with the firearms magazine.

In U.S. Pat. No. 3,208,348, which issued on Sept. 28, 1965, C. H. Lee disclosed an invention entitled GUN MUZZLE ATTACHMENT DEVICE FOR COUNTERACTING RECOIL. Lee's device operated on the venturi tube principle and caused the recoil gases to apply a force to the forward end of the barrel that was substantially equal to the recoil force and applied in an opposite direction to the recoil force. Lee's muzzle attachment was coaxial with the weapon's barrel. However, Lee's device is intended as a "choke" for shotgun type weapons and would not be useful or applicable to rifle type weapons.

In U.S. Pat. No. 4,833,808, which issued on May 30, 1989, T. Strahan disclosed an invention entitled ANTI-RECOIL DEVICE. Strahan's device was also a gas-operated device. This device threaded into the end of a modified barrel and was coaxial with the barrel. Strahan's device had ports that diverted a portion of the recoil gases towards a spring mounted weight, thus driving the weight forward. Thus, the weight applies a force to the forward end of the device that was substantially equal to the recoil force and that was applied in a direction opposite the recoil force, thus counteracting the recoil force.

In U.S. Pat. No. 812,326, which issued on Feb. 13, 1906. John Browning disclosed an invention entitled RECOIL BRAKE FOR AUTOMATIC GUNS. Mr. Browning's recoil brake consisted of contractile collar-brake which operated frictionally upon the magazine of the gun. This collar-brake consisted of a split collar having a beveled flange that coacted with a beveled shoulder carried disposed at the forward end of the magazine. As the barrel traveled rearwardly during recoil, the beveled shoulder engages the beveled flange of the split collar causing the split collar to contract against the magazine. However, Mr. Browning's muzzle brake was not coaxial with the barrel and did not apply any force outwardly against a supportive tube coaxial with the barrel.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a recoil dampening device having a dynamic brake system which spreads the recoil force over a large period of time, thus effectively reducing the recoil force experienced by the shooter.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a recoil dampening device that is coaxial with the barrel of a weapon.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a recoil dampening device that generates an outward force, that is self-locating and self-compensating for wear and thermal changes, against a supporting tube coaxial with the barrel of a weapon.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a recoil dampening device that accommodates the .50 BMG cartridge and larger cartridges, such as the 14.5 mm Russian and the 20 mm Vulcan cartridges, thus allowing these large cartridges to be comfortably fired from a shoulder-fired weapon.

Other objects and advantages over the prior art will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reading the detailed description together with the drawings as described as follows.

In accordance with the various features of this invention, a recoil dampening device incorporating a dynamic braking system and index ring is provided. The recoil dampening device of the present invention is intended for use on weapons, especially heavy caliber weapons, in which, upon discharge of a cartridge, the barrel travels rearwardly as a result of the recoil force, i.e. a recoiling barrel. The recoil dampening device is coaxial with the weapon's barrel and is comprised of a constant pressure brake assembly disposed proximate the forward end of the barrel and a dynamic brake assembly disposed rearwardly of the constant pressure brake assembly. The barrel and the brake assemblies are carried within a cylindrical tube that is coaxial with the brake assemblies and the barrel. Each brake assembly applies a frictional braking force against the inner surface of the tube and against the external surface of the barrel. As the weapon is discharged, the force of the recoil causes the barrel to travel rearwardly against a spring member that is coaxial with the barrel. The spring engages the dynamic brake assembly and as the barrel travels rearwardly under the impetus of the recoil impulse, the force applied to the dynamic brake is increased in a linear fashion. This increase in force causes an increasing amount of frictional braking pressure to be applied to the inner surface of the tube and the exterior surface of the barrel. When the frictional braking force exceeds the recoil force, the rearward travel of the barrel is halted and the energy stored within the spring returns the barrel to the battery position ("battery"). Thus the acceleration of the recoil impulse is applied to the shooter through the frame of the weapon over a longer period of time thus reducing the perceived recoil force experienced by the shooter.

The above mentioned features of the invention will become more clearly understood from the following detailed description of the invention read together with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1A illustrates a cross-sectional view of the recoil dampening device of the present invention with the barrel in the battery position. A stock and trigger guard are shown in phantom.

Figure 1B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the recoil dampening device of the present invention with the barrel in full recoil.

FIG. 2 illustrates an enlarged view of the area surrounded by circle 2 showing the coaxial dynamic brake assembly of the recoil dampening device of the present invention.

FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate an enlarged view of the area surrounded by circles 3A-3B showing the coaxial constant pressure brake assembly and one-way pneumatic valve of the recoil dampening device of the present invention.

FIG. 4 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the device of the present invention taken along line 4--4 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one of the expansion rings and co-acting compression ring utilized according to the present invention.

A recoil dampening device, constructed in accordance with the present invention is illustrated generally as 10 in the figures. While the recoil dampening device is illustrated embodied within a single shot breech loaded weapon, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, that the present invention would also be applicable in any type of firearm in which all or a portion of the barrel moves in recoil with relation to the frame of the weapon. Illustrated is a rifle having a breech loaded firing mechanism 18, a barrel 20 and a tube frame 25. In the preferred embodiment, the barrel 20 and the tube frame 25 are constructed of titanium and machined aluminum respectively. A shoulder stock and trigger guard, (each shown in phantom in FIG. 1A), are secured to tube frame 25, such that tube frame 25 is carried over the shooter's shoulder. During the recoil impulse, barrel 20 travels rearwardly within tube frame 25 from the battery position, shown in FIG. 1A, to a full recoil position, shown in Fig. 1B. At the conclusion of the recoil impulse, barrel 20 returns to battery. In the preferred embodiment, tube frame 25 has a cylindrical tube body 28 which is coaxial with barrel 20. Tube body 28 has a forward end 30 and a rearward end 32. Preferably, forward end 30 and rearward end 32 are provided with internal, square or "acme" threads. The threads disposed at the forward end 30 of tube body 28 interact with external acme threads disposed on forward end cap 36, while the threads disposed at the rearward end 32 of tube body 28 interact with external threads disposed on rearward end cap 38. While any configuration of threading for tubing body 28, forward end cap 36 and rearward end cap 38 would suffice, acme threads are utilized in order to minimize the risk of cross-threading. Forward end cap 36 and rearward end cap 38 are, like tube body 28, coaxial with barrel 20 and each have a centrally disposed opening through which barrel 20 extends.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that, due to the rifling commonly found in a rifle barrel, a substantial amount of torque is applied to barrel 20. In order to prevent barrel 20 from spinning about its longitudinal axis within tube body 28, an index ring 72 is provided. Index ring 72 is coaxial with barrel 20 and with tube body 28 and is provided with at least one and preferably a plurality of internal splines 74 which engage registering longitudinal grooves 75 provided along the exterior surface of barrel 20 and at least one and preferably a plurality of external splines 76 which engage registering longitudinal grooves 77 provided along the interior surface of tube body 28. Index ring 72 is preferably constructed of a material that will not abrade barrel 20 or tube body 28 and most preferably is constructed of bronze.

In a conventional weapon, the recoil impulse is distributed to the shooter in approximately 3/1000's of a second. In order to spread the recoil impulse over a longer period of time, a coaxial dynamic braking system is utilized by the present invention. The dynamic braking system is coaxial with tube frame 25 and barrel 20 and comprises a dynamic brake assembly, shown in detail in FIG. 2 a spring 40, a spring retainer 42 threadably secured to barrel 20 forward of spring 40 and a one-way pneumatic valve which is shown in detail in FIGS. 3A and 3B. Each component, the dynamic brake assembly, spring 40, spring retainer 42 and the one-way pneumatic valve assembly is coaxial with tube body 28 and barrel 20. When assembled, spring 40 applies approximately eighteen to twenty-five pounds of spring pressure to the dynamic brake assembly.

The dynamic brake assembly comprises a pair of expansion rings 45 and an interfitting compression ring 50 and is disposed at the rearward end of tube body 32. One side of each expansion ring 45 has a concave or internal frusto-conical surface 48 having the same angle as and coacting with a convex or external frusto-conical end 53 of compression ring 50. In the preferred embodiment, the angle of internal frusto-conical surface 48 defines a self-releasing taper in the range of approximately 20°-35° and is most preferably 25° . The opposite side of each of the expansion rings 45 is flat. The compression ring 50 is severed longitudinally and the expansion rings 45 are severed longitudinally in one or more places so as to be capable of being inwardly and outwardly, respectively, distorted radially. In the preferred embodiment, expansion ring 45 has a plurality of longitudinal cuts and is provided with an annular groove 46. For purposes of maintaining the segments of expansion ring 45 in the proper geometric alignment during assembly and disassembly of the weapon a loose segment-retaining ring (not shown) can be provided. Disposed between the dynamic brake assembly and rearward end cap 38 is a flat washer 34 that serves to protect the end of rearward end cap 38 from being abraded by the radial flexing of expansion ring 45. In the preferred embodiment, expansion rings 45 are constructed of titanium, chosen for its high shear resistance and light weight. Preferably compression ring 50 is constructed of bearing bronze so as not to abrade barrel 20.

Spring 40 is selected so as to provide approximately twenty pounds of spring pressure against the dynamic brake assembly when barrel 20 is at battery and approximately eighty pounds of spring pressure against dynamic brake assembly when barrel 20 is in full recoil. As the weapon is fired, the recoil impulse drives barrel 20 rearwardly. Spring retainer 42 engages and compresses spring 40 against a second flat washer 41. This exerts a force against expansion ring 45. As barrel 20 travels rearwardly the force applied to expansion ring 45 by spring 40 increases in a linear fashion. As force is applied to expansion ring 45, expansion ring 45 is forced over compression ring 50. This causes expansion ring 45 to distort outward radially, applying a an increasing amount of self-locating braking force against the interior surface of tube body 28. Simultaneously, compression ring 50 is caused to distort inward radially, applying a frictional braking force against the exterior surface of barrel 20. The linear increase in force applied by the rearward travel of barrel 20 causes an increasing amount of braking pressure to be applied to the inner surface of tube body 28 and, likewise, increases the frictional braking force applied to the exterior surface of barrel 20. At the time the frictional braking force exceeds the rearward acceleration of barrel 20, the rearward motion of barrel 20 is halted and the resulting kinetic energy stored in spring 40 returns the barrel to battery. The shooter experiences the recoil impulse over a period of time that is approximately one-third of a second.

It will be recognized that as spring 40 returns barrel 20 to battery, an additional force is exerted against the shooter. While this force is manageable, a one-way pneumatic valve assembly for slowing the return of barrel 20 to battery is utilized in the preferred embodiment. In the preferred embodiment, the one-way pneumatic valve assembly is coaxial with barrel 20 and tube body 28. Referring to FIGS. 3A and 3B, it will be seen that spring retainer 42 is substantially L-shaped in cross-section having a first leg 43 and a second leg 44 and is threadably secured to barrel 20 adjacent the forward end of spring 40. Spring retainer 42 is dimensioned so as to provide an air gap between first leg 43 of spring retainer 42 and the interior surface of tube body 28. Adjacent the forward end of second leg 44 of spring retainer 42 is a perforated flat ring 80. In the preferred embodiment, perforated flat ring 80 is provided with a plurality of holes 82. Like spring retainer 42, perforated flat ring 80 is threadably secured to barrel 20. A sealing ring 84 is sandwiched between spring retainer 42 and perforated flat ring 80. Sealing ring 84 is dimensioned so as to provide an air-tight seal between sealing ring 84 and the interior surface of tube body 28 while providing an air gap between sealing ring 84 and the second leg 44 of spring retainer 42. In the preferred embodiment, sealing ring 84 is constructed from TEFLON and is provided with annular protrusions 85 which form an air tight-seal against the interior surface of tube body 28. The holes 82 in perforated flat ring 80 are selectively positioned so as not to be covered by sealing ring 84 when sealing ring 84 is positioned against perforated flat ring 80.

The one-way pneumatic valve assembly divides the interior of tube body 28 into a forward air chamber 86 and a rearward air chamber 88. As barrel 20 travels rearwardly during recoil, sealing ring 84 engages perforated flat ring 80 and air is allowed to travel freely from rearward air chamber 88, between first leg 43 of spring retainer 42 and the interior surface of tube body 28, through holes 82, in the direction of arrow 94, and into the rapidly enlarging forward air chamber 86. However, as barrel 20 returns to battery, sealing ring 84 engages first leg 43 of spring retainer 42 and prevents backflow of air from forward air chamber 86 to rearward air chamber 88, see arrow 92, as barrel 20 returns to battery. This impediment to air flow momentarily compresses the air within forward air chamber 86 and cushions and slows the return of barrel 20 to battery while the air leaks through the components of the constant force brake assembly and through the junction between forward end cap 36 and tube body 28. To prevent air from rapidly leaking through the junction between forward end cap 36 and barrel 20, and thus reducing the efficiency of the one-way pneumatic valve assembly, forward end cap 36 is provided with an O-ring 90 which provides a substantially air-tight seal between forward end cap 36 and barrel 20. O-ring 90 is preferably constructed of polyethylene. It will be recognized by those skilled in the art that alternate configurations could be designed to prevent backflow of air from forward air chamber 86 to rearward air chamber 88. The use of a one-way pneumatic valve assembly extends the time that the shooter experiences the recoil impulse from approximately one-third of a second to better than a second. It will be further understood that sealing ring 84 frictionally engages the interior of tube body 28 and frictionally slides along the interior surface of tube body 28 as barrel 20 recoils and returns to battery. Thus in the preferred embodiment, sealing ring 84 is constructed of a lightweight material that is highly nonabrasive and will maintain an air-tight seal against the interior of tube body 28.

In order to maintain concentricity between barrel 20 and tube body 28 while barrel 20 is at battery and during recoil, a coaxial constant pressure brake assembly comprising a second pair of expansion rings 60 and interfitting compression ring 66 is disposed within the forward end of tube body 28 and is engaged by forward end cap 36. Expansion ring 60 and compression ring 66 are constructed the same as, and function similarly to expansion ring 45 and compression ring 50 described above and are coaxial with barrel 20. However, rather than applying dynamic frictional braking pressure, i.e. frictional braking pressure that changes actively, expansion ring 60 and compression ring 66 apply a slight, constant braking force to barrel 20 and the interior surface of forward end of tube body 28. Constant pressure is maintained by compressing the pair of expansion rings 60 against compression ring 66 by means of a spring washer 62 adjacent to forward end cap 36 and a snap ring 68 carried at the forward end 30 of tube body 28. Similar to their counterparts in the dynamic brake assembly, expansion rings 60 are preferably constructed of titanium and compression ring 66 is preferably constructed of bearing bronze.

It will be recognized by those skilled in the art that the exterior surface of the barrel can be beveled in areas that are not engaged by either of the brake assemblies for the purpose of saving weight. However, as the weight of the barrel decreases or as the caliber of the weapon increases, a longer distance of barrel travel must be allowed for within tube body 28 and/or the spring rate must be increased.

From the foregoing description, it will be recognized by those skilled in the art that a recoil dampening device for large caliber weapons offering advantages over the prior art has been provided. Specifically, the recoil dampening device for large caliber weapons provides a recoil dampening device having a dynamic brake system which spreads the recoil impulse over a longer period of time, thus effectively reducing the recoil force experienced by the shooter. The present invention also provides a recoil dampening device that is coaxial with the barrel of a weapon and that generates a frictional braking force outwardly against a supporting tube coaxial with the barrel of a weapon. The recoil dampening device of the present invention provides a recoil dampening device that accommodates the .50 BMG cartridge and larger cartridges, such as the 14.5 mm Russian and the 20 mm Vulcan cartridges, thus allowing these large cartridges to be comfortably fired from a shoulder-fired weapon.

While a preferred embodiment has been shown and described, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the disclosure, but rather it is intended to cover all modifications and alternate methods falling within the spirit and the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described the aforementioned invention,

Sours: https://www.google.com/patents/US5353681

Hart Systems, L.L.C.

Rad1Rad2

Recoil Absorbtion Devices

Welcome to Hart Systems designers and manufactures of professional shooting equipment.

At Hart Systems we strive to provide shooters with the best equipment and service that todays technology has to provide.

In 1996 we set out to develop a recoil reduction system that would considerably reduce the amount of felt recoil and operate smoothly with an integrated adjustable pad dropped to its lowest setting. We accomplished this with what is today our R.A.D. System #1.

Old Rad

R.A.D. stands for Recoil Absorption Device. This device uses hydraulic fluid to reduce the kinetic energy produced by the firing of a shotgun or rifle. This is superior to other methods that use springs to store the energy during the motion of the gun during recoil. The stored potential energy in the spring will then be transferred back to the shooter at the end of the recoil motion. By using the hydraulic fluid to dampen recoil the kinetic energy is dissipated during the motion of the gun during recoil. This allows the motion of the gun to achieve controlled linear deceleration with a minimum reaction force.

At Hart Systems we enjoy helping shooters become more competitive. With our design capabilities the options are endless for the development of custom shooting equipment. So feel free to contact us at the address below to discuss your needs.


To find a dealer near you contact [email protected]
Hart Systems, L.L.C.
502 N. 9th Street
Lancaster, MO 63548
(660) 279-0055

Questions or comments can be emailed to [email protected]

Sours: http://www.hartshooting.com/
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Recoil buffer

A recoil buffer is a factory-installed or aftermarket component of firearms which serves to reduce the velocity and/or cushion the impact of recoiling parts of a firearm.

Design[edit]

The simplest form of recoil buffer is made from a resilient and deformable material (leather, rubber, polymer e.g. a rubber butt pad on a shotgun).[1] A second way of producing a recoil buffer is to insert a spring into the recoil train—the path/part(s) generating recoil impulse. This spring is mounted to the point(s) where the firearm contacts a mechanical holder such as a tripod or human upper torso. Reducing the initial jolt, the rate and/or extent of rearward displacement, and any internal impacts in the operating parts of a firearm[1] can reduce the shooter's perception of recoil, and may also work to extend the life of the mechanism and its parts. More sophisticated designs use hydraulic[2] or pneumaticshock absorbers;[3] systems of springs, cams and levers to modify, dampen, or dissipate the rearward impulse generated as the projectile is fired down the bore of the firearm. Aftermarket buffers are often moulded bumpers or additional springs placed between operating metal parts which impact one another, such as the slide and the frame of a semi-automatic pistol. This type of buffer cushions the battering force of repeated metal on metal impact, reducing wear on parts and lengthening the service life of the firearm.[4] Reduction of perceived recoil discomfort is an immediate added benefit of this type of recoil buffer.[4]

Some pneumatic recoil buffers used in firearms are fast, low-power gas springs. When compressed, they present initial resistance as the rod-to-seal grip is broken and then they move in a regular manner. An additional small spring can be used inside the gas spring if rapid turnaround times are needed. Coil-type springs twist and the coils try to ride over each other when moving and this chaotic movement does not exist with gas springs, hence reducing twist and jump of the firearm. These features are very advantageous. Fine tuning of the spring power is also possible by altering the internal gas volume. This design for firearms was invented and patented by Collins and Shipman of Bedford, UK and Bergstrom in the U.S. in 2001.[citation needed]

Controversy[edit]

There is some debate as to whether or not buffers really reduce recoil, with some arguing they actually increase it and, in addition, cause malfunctions of the firearm.[5] This debate mainly occurs with guns that weren't originally designed for recoil buffers, such as the M1911 and AK-47, but has also extended to designs that included them originally. The counter argument generally is that if the buffer is made out of proper materials it can absorb the recoil instead of transferring it and that most malfunctions are caused by cheap plastic buffers.

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recoil_buffer
001 Recoil Reduction BCG Large Frame 1080p

RIFLE/SHOT GUN RECOIL REDUCTION SYSTEM

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a recoil reduction system for rifles and shot guns, especially those used for hunting and sports activities.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The recoil is a characteristic common to all firearm types, which leads to particularly significant effects in the case of longer guns. This phenomenon, a characteristic application of the action/reaction principle, indicates the impulse that causes the gun to move back due to the impulse that the gun imparts to the bullet when firing it. The shooter, and in particular the user of long guns, is often subjected to considerable impulsive forces in the rifle stock support zone or butt stock end plate. The discharge (firing) of a shoulder held firearm can generate forces of 300 kg (660 pounds) on up, which is impacted onto the shooter's shoulder. This happens through the end of the butt stock.

The object of the present invention is to provide a retro-fit or original equipment manufactured recoil reduction system to the butt stock for significantly reducing these recoil impulsive forces.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a recoil dampening system for shot guns, rifles, or any other shoulder fired firearm. As used hereinafter, the term “rifle” is generically used to be inclusive of any shoulder fired firearm, including rifles, shot guns, etc. Further, as used hereinafter, the term “butt end of a rifle stock” and the like refers to an original uncut butt end (wood or metal stock) or a stock that has been modified by cutting off a portion of the butt end, that is, the resultant new butt end of the stock.

The invention comprises the two parallel spaced-apart spring operated pistons mounted between two spaced-apart plates, separated in part to work simultaneously together to provide an equal amount of pressure to the pistons. The pistons preferably have a pre-load of 250 kg (550 pounds), and can be changed to increase or decrease the pre-load +or −50 kg. A recoil pad which is mounted to the end of the distal metal plate from the butt stock provides additional relief to the shooter and brings the impact well within the limits of the recoil.

The impact of the recoil is instant. The pistons are the first to react, the recoil pad anchors the second. The invention is based on a simple system of mounting a unit with a controlled clamping system that will contain more than 60% of the recoil to the shooter. Where a recoil pad generally provides a maximum of 15-25% reduced recoil shock absorption, the present invention together with a pad can reduce the recoil 60% -90% range.

The invention is a retro-fit for an owner of a rifle. It has two purposes, one for reducing the recoil and the other for the owner to control the length of his stock. It consists of two operations, one for cutting the butt end of the stock to mount the system and the other is the mounting itself by drilling two pilot holes in the butt end of the stock to fasten the inventive system with screws, typically two is sufficient.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to the drawings, disclose a typical example of the present invention, which is a rifle recoil reduction system, depicted generally as 10.

The rifle recoil reduction system 10 comprises recoil damping means 12 for reducing a recoil impact of a rifle. The damping means 12 is mounted between two spaced-apart plates 14a,14b, wherein one of the plates 14a is configured to be attached to an outside surface of a butt end of a rifle stock 16. The attachment can be done in a number of ways known on the art but the preferred method is simply to use a couple of fasteners 18, like screws. As an example, depicts fasteners 18 as being inserted into a counter-bore 3/32 inch deep×⅜ inch diameter using pan head 8×¾ inch long screws. Damping means 12 are typically fastened to each end plate 14a,14b, as shown in by way of example.

The invention further comprises recoil padding means 20 for providing additional recoil impact absorption mounted to another of the end plates (plate 14b shown in ), which is distally located from the butt end of the rifle stock 16. A preferred padding means is to simply provide a slip-on pad over the distally locally plate 14b such as the commercially available slip-on recoil pad made by the WINCHESTER® Company. The slip-on pad 20 can be mounted with screws 26 as depicted in , or adhesive mounted to the plate 14b (not shown), or both screwed and adhesively mounted, or simply just slipped over the plate 14b. In the depiction, as an example only, screws 26 can be sheet metal 6×¾ inch long screws. In fact, such a pad would as depicted on extend partially over part of the damping means 12 therefore serving as a shroud over the piston portion of the damping means 12 described below to protect the pistons from adverse environmental elements such as rain and dust or dirt. Nevertheless, the piston/guide arrangement depicted in the drawings could be reversed if desired by the end user.

The damping means 12 comprises a pair of parallel spaced-apart spring operated pistons 12a and a pair of mating piston guides 12b. The pistons 12a extend perpendicularly from one of the plates 14b and serving as sliding shafts configured to slide within the mating piston guides 12b. The mating piston guides 12b also serve as a housing for the respective pistons 12a. The pistons 12a can be attached to the plate 14b using fasteners 22b like cap screws and the guides 12b can be attached to the plate 14a using similar fasteners 22a.

A bushing 12c is inserted at an end of each of the mating piston guides 12b. The bushings 12c extend within the guides a predetermined distance, for example, about 7/16 inches, and the pistons 12a are configured to slide within an internal diameter of each bushing 12c. It is preferred that the bushing 12c be made from a material dissimilar then that of the piston 12a and guide 12b. For example, the piston 12a can be made from a copper base material, include alloys of nickel-copper, nickel-copper-aluminum, bronze, brass, etc., and the piston 12a and guide 12b can be made from a hard coat anodized aluminum material, stainless material and other materials dissimilar to the bushing material.

The invention further includes a spring 12d configured to be inserted and compressed within each of the guides 12b, and a flat circularly shaped metal material configured in a washer form 12e to interface between each piston 12a end and each spring 12d.

It is an object of the present invention is to provide a system that allows the piston to travel about 7/16 inches when discharged to spend its energy toward its limits of motion, which is controlled by what each owner expects in recoil. Every recoil system is different in nature. The present invention provides for a system that harnesses a portion of its energy, resulting in a controlled shoot.

In order to provide an additional cushioning or shock absorbing characteristic, an elastomeric cushion 12f or bumper is located between the washer 12e and an internal interface surface of the bushing 12c. Preferably, the elastomeric cushion is in the form of a rubber o-ring or a rubber washer that is concentric to the outside diameter of the piston 12a. A rubber material such as butyl-n material is suitable.

An example of approximate dimension that could be used to make the invention include the following:

The piston 12a can be 1 1/16 inches in length with an outside diameter of 0.439 inches. The bushing 12c can have a length of 7/16 inch with a threaded outside diameter suitable for threadingly engaging a threaded end of the guide 12b such that when screwed into the guide, the bushing 12c is fully inserted within the guide 12b. The bushing can have an outside diameter of 0.687 inches with an internal diameter of 0.440 inches. The washer 12e would be placed against the face of the piston 12a and secured with a fastener 24 into the face of the piston 12a as conceptually depicted in . A boss (not shown) may be provided at the end face of the piston 12a to match the internal diameter of the washer 12e to ensure the alignment of the washer 12e before securing with fastener 24. Fastener 24 can be a 10-32×⅜ flat head cap screw screwed into a 10-32 thread×½ inch hole. The washer 12e can be a 1/16×0.600 steel washer. Piston 12a may have a base plate 12g that can be optionally welded to plate 14b or fastened to plate 14b. The base plate 0.045 thick by ⅞ inch diameter comes from turning the piston out of ⅞ inch material leaving 0.045 inch. The piston 12a is ultimately attached to the plate 14b using fasteners 22b, typically a 10-32×⅜ flat head cap screw screwed into a 10-32 thread×½ inch hole.

The guides 12b can be made from a ⅞ inch stock material with a length of 1 11/16 inches long. It too can be attached to the plate 12a using fastener 22a similar to the 10-32 threaded cap screws described above. Bushing 12c would insert into an portion of the guide 12b that has a 7/16 inch depth and a 0.688 inside threaded diameter. The portion of the guide 12b that houses the spring 12d has a depth of 1 inch and an internal diameter of 0.607 inches.

It should be understood that the preceding is merely a description of one or more embodiments of this invention and that numerous changes to the disclosed embodiments can be made in accordance with the disclosure herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The preceding description, therefore, is not meant to limit the scope of the invention. Rather, the scope of the invention is to be determined only by the appended claims and their equivalents.

Sours: https://patents.justia.com/patent/20130145668

Systems recoil dampening

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The Science of Recoil - Part 1: Your Shoulder and Recoil

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Now discussing:

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